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Glue Squeeze Out

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Forum topic by TungOil posted 04-01-2020 02:09 PM 617 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TungOil

1381 posts in 1234 days


04-01-2020 02:09 PM

Glue squeeze out is inevitable on most projects and is a sign that you have not starved the glue joint. My method for removing excess glue is simple. I prefer not to wipe up wet glue with a damp rag as this tends to push the excess glue into the grain. This is particularly a problem with open grained woods like oak, mahogany and sapele. Waiting for the glue to dry can make it very difficult (sometimes impossible) to remove from a finished piece.

Since squeeze out typically sits ‘on top’ of the wood, I prefer to wait for the squeezed out glue to just begin to set up, then remove it carefully with a chisel. The key to this method is waiting for the glue to begin to set, but not fully set, before you begin to work with the chisel. Timing is critical. If you start too soon, you will expose wet glue and risk making a mess. Wait too long and it will be difficult to remove the excess glue. The right time is when the glue starts to set around the outside, but still appears wet inside.

Once the glue has partially cured, I approach the squeeze out to essentially cut it off by sliding the chisel under the areas where it is in contact with an exposed face.

You will know you have the timing right when excess glue cuts off cleanly, leaving no visible residue behind.

I hope you find this tip helpful!

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"


26 replies so far

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JackDuren

1155 posts in 1699 days


#1 posted 04-01-2020 02:19 PM

I’ll wash mine out…I use to think that enough was enough till we had a few chairs failed.

You can get away with it on standing pieces but when force is applied it’s a little more demanding on the joint to secure the piece from failing….

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GR8HUNTER

7450 posts in 1452 days


#2 posted 04-01-2020 02:48 PM

This is what I use after it dries to right texture and never had any problems :<)))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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sras

5431 posts in 3869 days


#3 posted 04-01-2020 06:01 PM

I was working out a comment on how I do this as I was opening up the post. It turns out you do it exactly as I do!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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pottz

9526 posts in 1724 days


#4 posted 04-01-2020 07:26 PM

i wash mine off also,it tight corners a toohbrush works great.your idea is great tung but id forget about it and ir would be hard.another thing is dry fit the parts and tape all the joints that will have glue squeeze out,but im too lazy to do that-lol.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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splintergroup

3681 posts in 1962 days


#5 posted 04-01-2020 08:00 PM

I love to catch the glue when it is in the same drying “zone”. Where I have difficulty is when trying to scrape it off in a corner (as with your picture #2).

The cross-grain scratches are what get me. Usually I’ll at least sand to final grit at joint-ends like these so I can avoid all the common hazards of sanding in these areas after assembly. I’ll often use a razor blade to do what you are showing with a chisel, which works well enough, but I’m a big fan of rubbing in some paste wax in these areas after dry-assembly.
A wipe with mineral spirits (sometimes a scrub with a took brush on really open grained woods) has never left me with any finish issues,

The worst thing is to let the glue fully harden if you are otherwise done sanding, the glue will inevitably pull up chunks of wood.

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

1515 posts in 287 days


#6 posted 04-01-2020 09:33 PM

I just close my eyes, clap my hands twice, open my eyes, and it is gone. Fabulous. No need for all that “work” stuff.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: Because cheese isnt a healthy source of cheese, I will use grated cucumber to top off this raw food vegan pizza.

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pottz

9526 posts in 1724 days


#7 posted 04-01-2020 09:52 PM



I just close my eyes, clap my hands twice, open my eyes, and it is gone. Fabulous. No need for all that “work” stuff.

- wildwoodbybrianjohns


i like this technique the best,gotta try it brian ;-)

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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Madmark2

1281 posts in 1328 days


#8 posted 04-01-2020 10:21 PM

I use a lexan spreader to give a thin uniform, 100% coverage glue film. I really don’t get a lot of squeeze out and what little there is tends to vanish on drying. 90% of the bulk of yellow liquid PVA glue is water, squeeze out will shrink by that much as it dries.

On small stuff I use a single edge razor blade for glue trim exactly as the OP does with his chisel.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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pintodeluxe

6120 posts in 3553 days


#9 posted 04-01-2020 10:28 PM

Your post described my morning quite accurately. I spent it removing glue squeeze out from a rocking chair.

I agree with your technique.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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therealSteveN

5598 posts in 1314 days


#10 posted 04-01-2020 11:03 PM

I keep a cheap kitchen timer in the shop. After a glue up I’ll set it for 20 minutes. For me that seems to be the magical time to plow it away with a cheap chisel.

I have seen pieces with the tell tale glue sign where someone wiped away wet glue with a damp rag, UGLY. Usually it doesn’t rear it’s head until finish is applied, then there is hardly any way not to notice it. Possibly the biggest Non Norm behavior I practice.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Marpel

27 posts in 1029 days


#11 posted 04-02-2020 03:08 AM

Matt Jackson of Next Level Carpentry (Youtube – finish carpentry and cabinet making) has some great vids that not only take the viewer through a project but also includes tips and tricks. He likes to streamline processes for ease, speed and quality and is a pretty good presenter to boot. Don’t know him but he appears very experienced.
One of his tricks to deal with glue squeeze-out is to keep a small container of leftover fine sawdust from the project, throw a handful over the fresh glue-up and mix it in then sweep it off. Takes literally seconds, works like a charm with absolutely no glue residue left.
Found his vids a few months back and have watched pretty well all of them. Highly recommended for the tips and tricks alone.

Marv

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Tony1212

428 posts in 2474 days


#12 posted 04-02-2020 12:53 PM

I like to do the same as the OP, but I have issues with panel glue ups and the glue under the bars. I can never seem to get that bit of glue.

I bought a Mora knife that is almost like a chisel. I can easily get those little bits of glue off pretty easily after they dry.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

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Lazyman

5259 posts in 2127 days


#13 posted 04-02-2020 01:14 PM

Here is a a little trick for removing the glue on an inside corner of a box for example that I read in a magazine a few years ago. Save a plastic soda straw (grab em while you can) the next time you get a Big Gulp. When you are ready to remove the squeeze out, press the straw into the corner and run it along the glue line. The straw will conform to the shape of the corner and glue will accumulate inside the straw. No need to remove the glue from the straw. Just wait for it to completely dry and it will pop right out. I always have several straws in my shop so that I always have one without wet glue in it.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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JackDuren

1155 posts in 1699 days


#14 posted 04-02-2020 03:50 PM

Guy at the furniture company wasn’t putting enough glue on his chairs. He was told to have complete squeeze around the joint. He refused and was took to the office to be wrote up. He refused to sign the write up and was fired

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AlaskaGuy

5734 posts in 3049 days


#15 posted 04-02-2020 04:00 PM

Guy at the furniture company wasn t putting enough glue on his chairs. He was told to have complete squeeze around the joint. He refused and was took to the office to be wrote up. He refused to sign the write up and was fired

- JackDuren

I guess that proves the boss is the boss but doesn’t necessary mean he’d right.

I do the same as the OP with out failures. Glue that’s not in the joint isn’t doing any good if you ask me.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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