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Forum topic by Rapidone posted 03-30-2020 11:13 PM 601 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rapidone

4 posts in 66 days


03-30-2020 11:13 PM

Hello Everyone

I am a hobbyist wood model making, looking at buying a new scroll saw, in the market for used
seeking advice . My current piece of equipment, which I now regret buying years back is a Skill 3335 – 70 16”
scroll saw, was ok when I first used but over time seems to have alignment issue, with blade, cuts and some vibration!
I am sure to most this it not a really scroll saw !! why make a sub -par piece of equipment live and learn. Anyway
models I have been looking at following which are more in my price range. A single speed Hegner multimax 14
or a Dewalt DW 788 and an older Excalibur 30” says made in Canada . I like the idea of the German made Hegner I am sure good quality, but from what I have read may not be the best value, for one of there models, limited single speed have to
get use to very quick cutting of parts brakes blades easy. Read some reviews on the Dewalt DW 788 seams to be a bit mixed so say good for the value some say not ? Excalibur on craigslist not sure if ad is current still for sale or not ?
for the most part max of cutting up to 3/4 material stock
Any help on this would be greatly appreciated David


16 replies so far

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Woodmaster1

1445 posts in 3327 days


#1 posted 03-30-2020 11:57 PM

I have the delta 20” 40-694. They just like the Dewalt but cheaper in price. Can be purchased from Home Depot when on sale for $299.

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Kelly

2960 posts in 3684 days


#2 posted 03-31-2020 04:53 AM

I had a Hegner single speed I bought for $200 and sold for $400 ten years later. Bought a Hawk for $100, sold it for $250 and bought variable speed Hegner for $300. The guy I sold the Hawk to drools over the Hegner for smoothness of operation. Too, others talk about them being work horses.

I like the [over priced] blade holders far better.


NOTE: All the transactions were by way of craigslist

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MrUnix

8013 posts in 2938 days


#3 posted 03-31-2020 06:28 AM

I don’t have enough experience with the different models to formulate an answer for you, but you may want to visit some of the scroll saw specific sites that have pretty extensive reviews on most all of them out there.

Having said that – I have an older 18” Delta C-arm saw (40-601) that I picked up at a yard sale for $35. I have beat the crap out of that machine and it just keeps on ticking – so I can highly recommend it. I see them on CL frequently for $100 or less. However – they have a no-longer available magnetic speed sensing rotor that tends to break apart with age, rendering the machine basically unusable. That is why I was able to get mine cheap. The good news is you can make a new rotor for a few bucks and be back working like new fairly easily!

I also have always kept an eye out for a Hegner or Hawk, simply because I always heard they were top of the line machines. I finally, after several years of looking, got a great deal on a variable speed Hegner and am really loving it. It is simplistic in design, smooth as silk, and built to last. I’m not sure if it’s really worth the price they are commanding new, but the used prices are typically pretty reasonable. And the company is still in business and any parts you may need are readily available.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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John Smith

2362 posts in 902 days


#4 posted 03-31-2020 11:36 AM

David, what Brad said: “visit some of the scroll saw specific sites”
such as Scroll Saw Village . com
some of the most critical questions are asked and answered using the “search”
feature about blade types and holders, motors, speed controllers, etc. in scroll saws.

.

-- I am a painter: that's what I do, I like to paint things. --

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ibewjon

1545 posts in 3533 days


#5 posted 03-31-2020 03:45 PM

+10 for Hegner. Parts availability is a great thing. I have two, both 14” single speed, one was $90, the other $100, but it came with about 500 blades. I bought the second saw because it is a complete set of spare parts for very little $. And maybe the wife or grandkids will learn to like it someday. Local auctions or Craigslist. At the auction, the other saws sold for $200-300, Hegner was an unknown name, so I got it for $90.

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Rapidone

4 posts in 66 days


#6 posted 03-31-2020 04:09 PM

Hello

Thank you everyone for posting appreciated will take your advice Brad, and John, am going to post on Scroll Saw Village as well.
Old Delta original I am sure was good quality, however not sure I want to mess with fixing one if it did not work right?
do the old Deltas fit most modern blades standard pin design . Next I like the idea of an order Hegner variable speed saws. Wow Kelly sounds like you got a great deal on one ! all I see price wise just under a thousand used I am assuming you bought local on Craigslist ? There is a Hegner single speed on eBay for around $400 but sounds like seeing it is of the single speed motor design it would take an experience operator to get good results. Read really zips though wood very fast . Hawk correct me if this is wrong but I did read somewhere problems with availability of parts currently.

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ibewjon

1545 posts in 3533 days


#7 posted 03-31-2020 04:18 PM

Mine are single speed. I just feed it slower. You might want to check with advance machinery, the motor may be replaceable with a variable speed motor for less than the price of a new saw. Used is key, along with patience.

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MrUnix

8013 posts in 2938 days


#8 posted 03-31-2020 04:50 PM

do the old Deltas fit most modern blades standard pin design .
- Rapidone

Pinned blades are very rare these days. The 5” pinless blade is pretty much standard on all newer machines. As for the Deltas.. the very old models could use just about any blade you threw at it, including cut up hack saw blades! But the spring type return was problematic for many, particularly when using very small blades.

The Delta I have was one of their semi-commercial C-arm machines, built in the 80’s. In many respects, it is a much more feature rich machine than my 1991 Hegner. The table will not only tilt, but swivel, so you have an unlimited cutting angle capability. It has replaceable throat plate, which only the newer Hegners now have. It has the tension release up front near the blade, while the older Hegners didn’t have any quick release at all (although you can buy one to retrofit on the rear)... the newer ones do though. The LED speed display up front is nice, but not a super useful feature IMO, since speed changes are generally by feel for the work, not a number on a display. I also prefer the blade clamps on the Delta and it’s blade size flexibility… the Hegner requires different blade clamps depending on what size blade you are using. I do like the upper quick clamp design of the Hegner though – the delta requires the use of a tool.

The ‘fix’ is pretty simple on the model I have, and because of the broken rotor issue, you can frequently find them really cheap on the used market. The newer Delta Q-3 is its successor, and AFAIK, does not suffer the same problem. Here is a local LJ review of the Q3 compared to the hawk: Delta Q3 40-650

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Kelly

2960 posts in 3684 days


#9 posted 03-31-2020 04:50 PM

Rapidone, yep, they were all local finds (within an hour or so (EVERYTHING is at least an hour or so away here)).

Missed a variable speed Hegner a year and a half back for $300 or $400 at a Habitat for Humanity store about three hours away, but, as indicated, it worked out.

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Rapidone

4 posts in 66 days


#10 posted 04-01-2020 02:29 AM

Looking around might have found an old Hegner variable speed checked said it powers on, not sure what questions to ask
does have some rust on parts of the equipment, bellows dry rotted out, looks to have had a pretty hard life
neglected a bit for sure. What could go wrong on one that has not been well taken care of? are most part replaceable

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MrUnix

8013 posts in 2938 days


#11 posted 04-01-2020 03:38 AM

Looking around might have found an old Hegner variable speed checked said it powers on
[...]
What could go wrong on one that has not been well taken care of? are most part replaceable
- Rapidone

The Hegner is a very simple and easy to work on machine, which is part of its strength – there is not a lot that can go wrong on them, and parts are still available, even for the older models. The bellows is frequently dry-rotted on used machines, and about $45 to replace. Advanced Machinery is the US supplier for Hegner and can get you just about anything you may need.

Depending on age and what you use the machine for, you may need to upgrade a few things. On my M18, I found that I really needed to upgrade to a rear quick release tension rod and upper quick blade clamp. That upgrade alone made the machine a joy to use compared to how it was stock. If you want to use very small blades, you may need to get the smaller blade clamps – and the same if you want to use very thick blades. IIRC, the stock clamps are good for size 5-9 blades. And while the quick clamp will accept any size blade, the lower clamp will still need to be sized properly.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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PaulDoug

2382 posts in 2443 days


#12 posted 04-01-2020 03:34 PM

I have a Hegner VS and would not part with it. I have it and a Seyco. I have owned a DeWalt, Excalibur, Seyco and the Hegner. If I were going to buy a new Excalibur type saw it would be the Pegas. But if I ever find a great deal on a used Hegner…. I will own two Hegners.. I use my Hegner for 90% of my scrolling and I do a lot of scrolling.

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

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Rapidone

4 posts in 66 days


#13 posted 04-01-2020 06:10 PM

Thanks for the information guys I take it the motors are fairly robust, the heart of the piece for equipment
they sure are expensive to replace !

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Dark_Lightning

4058 posts in 3848 days


#14 posted 04-05-2020 02:10 AM

I bought my DeWalt scroll saw (without the stand, as I made a pull-out drawer for it) from Grizzly.com. It does everything I want it to do.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

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Jim Finn

2830 posts in 3661 days


#15 posted 04-05-2020 10:40 AM

I started with a harbor freight saw that is a piece of junk. DeWalt was next. Died after 20 months. I then bought the top of the line Hegner. I use this three speed saw for doing inlays. I found a 1986 hegner and I still have it and use it a lot. I found an old 15” Jet saw for $15 on craigslist, up graded the clamps to match my Hegners and I still use this single speed saw somewhat. I keep it because it is smooth running and light to transport. Recently bought a used (2005) Hawk and it is a nice saw also. The problem I had with the DeWalt was because I was cutting 1 1/2” wood to make toys and it could not take cutting thick pine like that. It cuts fine but did not last for me. I would not recommend a Hegner for doing fretwork. Blade changes on other saws are quicker. Yes I currently have four running scroll saws! I use one every day for hours. If I was to buy a new saw now It would be the small variable speed Hegner.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Lubbock Texas

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