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taking apart a glue joint

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Forum topic by Pabs posted 03-30-2020 01:20 AM 360 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pabs

298 posts in 4190 days


03-30-2020 01:20 AM

hey all

I glued up part of my cabinet a couple of days ago. I had taken lots and lots of care to make sure everything was square and perfect, dry fit went really well, I was encouraged. then came the glue :)
everything was seemingly going well until I noticed one of the boards was not square anymore… by then too much time had passed to take the joints out so I left it there and figured I would play with it after and fix it.
the joints are plywood dado joints , 4 of them in total. I could leave as is but that would mean I would to try and fix the lack of squareness with the doors or trim.. I would rather not. playing with the idea of taking it apart. I’ve heard heat gun can have good results, also heard about using vinegar but never tried that.

any advice on how to remove those joints without doing any danmage?

thanks

-- Pabs


8 replies so far

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Pabs

298 posts in 4190 days


#1 posted 03-30-2020 01:42 AM

well…looks like I may not remove after all. I put the piece on a flat surface and checked square again and it’s off by less.. enough that I can live with it. but I am still curious on what you guys think is the best way to remove a joint if needed

thanks

-- Pabs

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shipwright

8526 posts in 3534 days


#2 posted 03-30-2020 01:47 AM

Use hide glue. It is reversible with heat and moisture.
https://www.lumberjocks.com/shipwright/blog/series/5437

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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rcs47

215 posts in 3866 days


#3 posted 03-30-2020 01:53 AM

Here is info on PVA

https://www.lumberjocks.com/topics/204874

You can always change your design to a lipped or overlay drawer & door to hide what you want. You will be the only one to know where to look.

Good luck.

-- Doug - As my Dad taught me, you're not a cabinet maker until you can hide your mistakes.

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LeeRoyMan

1067 posts in 463 days


#4 posted 03-30-2020 01:56 AM

I’ve had to knock them apart before.
I use a block of wood and a hammer. usually a couple of good hits gets it going,
YMMV depending on how much glue you used and how good of a joint you had.

Just to note, there are always variables that come into the decision on whether to try it or not.
Sometimes you could just bust it up and do more damage.

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

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WoodenDreams

1038 posts in 647 days


#5 posted 03-30-2020 01:58 AM

Moisture and heat only works with hide glue. I have not tried a vinegar. Sounds like your leaving it as is. We all have ooops once and while, can a learning experience. Dry fit first is good practice. Sometimes it a matter of adjusting clamps and clamp pressure at different points of the assembly to tweek the squareness, instead of taking it all apart.

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Foghorn

458 posts in 123 days


#6 posted 03-30-2020 03:05 AM

You didn’t say what glue you used. If it’s hide or something like Titebond Original PVA it’s pretty easy. Other glues are usually a lot tougher.

-- Darrel

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therealSteveN

5583 posts in 1311 days


#7 posted 03-30-2020 03:10 AM

160* starts moving most of the adhesives we use apart. But as Paul pointed out hide glue is the easiest to reverse.

Some great videos, showing the attributes of hide glue. Never know, you may become a convert.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/topics/308624

-- Think safe, be safe

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

298 posts in 4190 days


#8 posted 03-30-2020 11:58 AM



Moisture and heat only works with hide glue. I have not tried a vinegar. Sounds like your leaving it as is. We all have ooops once and while, can a learning experience. Dry fit first is good practice. Sometimes it a matter of adjusting clamps and clamp pressure at different points of the assembly to tweek the squareness, instead of taking it all apart.

- WoodenDreams


precisely…I think what happened is that some of my dados weren’t perfectly flat and when I put glue on and applied god pressure to close the joint it skewed the whole thing. When I dry fit the thing I didn’t apply as much pressure since the joint would close more easily because there was no glue in the joint.. always something to learn or deal with. every single project!

-- Pabs

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