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Regenerating Totes When They're Missing Critical Anatomical Parts

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Forum topic by poopiekat posted 03-28-2020 02:54 PM 610 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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poopiekat

4714 posts in 4464 days


03-28-2020 02:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: totes knobs repairing recycling rosewood resource

As a departure from my recent blog about casting Permaloid totes for hand planes, I discovered another use for those polysiloxane molds that I made.

I suddenly realized that I could resurrect my collection of Rosewood fragments that I have collected in the restoration of several planes I have done in the past. I theorized that I could assemble the rosewood bits into the molds, and pour in a re-cast and thus create a whole tote out of said fragments!! It works!!

Here’s my first patient: a Winchester #6, with the obligatory missing ‘horn’ from the tote.

It’s not an exact fit because I made the mold with a store-bought replacement tote that I purchased years ago, but it’s close enough to work.

After pouring and cure, oopsie a bit of mold flash, the epoxy creeping into the tiny gap between the halves of the mold.

Left and right view of of the raw casting, fresh out of the mold. As you can see, the epoxy managed to migrate under the tote on one side. This will all be sanded off easily, leaving only epoxy where no wood is present.

I’m not used to mixing the colors, the pigments are unbelievably concentrated and I was fearful of adding too much. It is a blend of blue, green and red, with some sparkles added.

This will be sanded, and any minute imperfections can be corrected with a touch of more epoxy, untinted.

I’ll be posting more pics soon, this tote after 12 hours still has a bit of ‘tack’ on the surface, so I’ll wait before sanding. I just wanted to post my progress so far.

Rosewood has become an issue, it is “the new ivory” and someday it will be illegal to sell or ship across the border. I’m glad I kept my scraps!!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!


12 replies so far

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poopiekat

4714 posts in 4464 days


#1 posted 03-28-2020 03:03 PM

https://www.lumberjocks.com/poopiekat/blog/130851

This is the original blog, where I created a mold in order to produce replacement totes and knobs.

The whole process reminds me of a toy I had as a kid, circa 1966, called “Creepy Crawler” where some liquid was poured in a mold and created bugs and worms. Oh, yeah…Plastigoop!!!

This Ecopoxy material I use does not need heat to cure. To be able to create parts you need quickly and easily, is a whole new world to me.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Just_Iain's profile

Just_Iain

322 posts in 1146 days


#2 posted 03-28-2020 06:26 PM



As a departure from my recent blog about casting Permaloid totes for hand planes, I discovered another use for those polysiloxane molds that I made.

I suddenly realized that I could resurrect my collection of Rosewood fragments that I have collected in the restoration of several planes I have done in the past. I theorized that I could assemble the rosewood bits into the molds, and pour in a re-cast and thus create a whole tote out of said fragments!! It works!!

Here s my first patient: a Winchester #6, with the obligatory missing horn from the tote.

It s not an exact fit because I made the mold with a store-bought replacement tote that I purchased years ago, but it s close enough to work.

After pouring and cure, oopsie a bit of mold flash, the epoxy creeping into the tiny gap between the halves of the mold.

Left and right view of of the raw casting, fresh out of the mold. As you can see, the epoxy managed to migrate under the tote on one side. This will all be sanded off easily, leaving only epoxy where no wood is present.

I m not used to mixing the colors, the pigments are unbelievably concentrated and I was fearful of adding too much. It is a blend of blue, green and red, with some sparkles added.

This will be sanded, and any minute imperfections can be corrected with a touch of more epoxy, untinted.

I ll be posting more pics soon, this tote after 12 hours still has a bit of tack on the surface, so I ll wait before sanding. I just wanted to post my progress so far.

Rosewood has become an issue, it is “the new ivory” and someday it will be illegal to sell or ship across the border. I m glad I kept my scraps!!

- poopiekat


Hey poopiekat, Rosewood can’t be shipped across a number of borders, including the US to Canada. Buying a Stanley 45 (with its Rosewood parts) gets blocked by the postal and shipping services. I had it happen multiple times last year when I was buying parts.

Iain

-- For those about to die, remember your bicycle helmet!

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poopiekat

4714 posts in 4464 days


#3 posted 03-28-2020 07:27 PM

Yup, as noted, Iain. All the more timely to return what broken scraps I have back to service again.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Phil32

1057 posts in 633 days


#4 posted 03-28-2020 10:09 PM

PK – Interesting! I should be happy for the complete & intact totes & knobs on my planes.
Your blog reminded me of a stage in the construction of two wooden kayaks. To strengthen the bow, the instructions suggested filling the wedge-shaped area with a mixture of epoxy & wood chips. So I gathered up some leftovers from woodcarving and woodturning.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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poopiekat

4714 posts in 4464 days


#5 posted 03-28-2020 10:51 PM

Ty, Phil!
Maybe it’s just me, but I feel that the role of epoxy in woodworking is really understated. It seldom gets mentioned, and your kayak construction process is proof of that.

Are those your kayaks? nice crafts, indeed!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Phil32

1057 posts in 633 days


#6 posted 03-28-2020 11:59 PM

I must admit that, as a woodcarver, I never use epoxy in my carvings. I have glued on important parts accidentally knocked off.

The kayaks were assembled from laser-cut kits from Pygmy Boats in Fort Townsend, WA. The first photo was at Meziadin Lake, British Columbia, on our way to Alaska. The second photo was on Resurrection Bay, Seward, Alaska. The decal on the front deck of mine is from “El Fin Del Mundo,” Ushuaia, Argentina – southernmost town in the world.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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poopiekat

4714 posts in 4464 days


#7 posted 03-31-2020 06:27 PM

Back to the project: Here is the re-constituted tote and knob, back home on the Winchester #6. This plane will join the queue for eventual refurbishment, but I kinda do like the brown patina on this ol’ gal as is. I’m experimenting with faux grain where necessary, but want to try a co-mingled pour of contrasting wood tones for realism.

This, to me, was an interesting little project, and I’m sure that with a new, improved mold, and additional upgrades to the procedure, it is possible to remanufacture totes that are missing the top ‘horn’.

I’ve got may 60 top horns to fix…. by and by. Not high on my priority list.

Hope you found this interesting!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Eric

204 posts in 968 days


#8 posted 04-06-2020 05:58 PM

Do you ever make new totes and knobs?

-- Eric

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poopiekat

4714 posts in 4464 days


#9 posted 04-06-2020 08:54 PM

Eric,
Did you make those totes? They look good!

Yes, I’ve made wooden totes by the dozens, experimenting with various methods, some of my own process. The procedures have been posted here in the past but get lost in the shuffle over the years. Where I live, good exotic lumber is very hard to come by, and astronomical in price. It takes me two days or more to bring one tote up to the finishing stage, and I just simply don’t have that kind of time to spare. Knobs? I can bang them out in less than an hour.

The purpose of this thread is just a side note to a venture on the use of epoxy casting in the polysiloxane molding process. The process is outlined in various You-Tube videos, where valuable objects can be created or cloned.
I’m fascinated by the Permaloid substitute used by some tool manufacturers in the 1950’s and I wanted to re-create this process. Then, my mind starts to ponder what else can be done with this procedure.

I just wanted to share it with others!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Eric

204 posts in 968 days


#10 posted 04-07-2020 03:25 PM

I did makes them. Most are made with Chechen which is a sustainable species found at reasonable prices locally. It takes me maybe 30mins total time for totes when I do a batch. Bandsaw, drum sander, belt sander, Iwasaki wood files and my shopsmith in horizontal drill mode are all I use.

For all the time and effort you use to refurbish I was wondering why not just go with a well made replacement?

-- Eric

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poopiekat

4714 posts in 4464 days


#11 posted 04-07-2020 04:02 PM

Eric,

I explained the purpose of this thread above. Making wooden totes? Been there, done that. Boring. Never seen ‘chechen’ out here on the frozen tundra.

I’m fine-tuning the process, made a few mistakes, but I’m now ready to create some Permaloid knobs and totes. I’ve never done epoxy casting before this year, I’m still on a learning curve. The potential for innovation is of great interest to me, and reconstituting rosewood fragments into usable totes is just one avenue I’m exploring.

Stay tuned for part two of my Permaloid blog, which is under construction as I write this!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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poopiekat

4714 posts in 4464 days


#12 posted 05-22-2020 08:46 PM

Okay… Still doing it. This molding/casting is pretty much uncharted waters for me, but I keep trying to refine the procedure for the best result.
This is my latest repaired tote, using better and more careful methods. This #8 tote was snapped off the same way as the one pictured above, but it is rosewood and worth saving.

Sorry, no ‘before’ pic, but you get the idea. I choked off the polysiloxane tote mold so that the epoxy would not travel too far beyond the broken horn of the original rosewood tote. Once cured, I only had to do a bit of filing and fairing in of the epoxy to blend in with the original contours. Then a couple of coats of urethane poly, after which I’ll sand it in and blend some acrylic colors to match the original grain pattern.

Folks, this is just a diversion, I’m just exploring the possibilities of creating and repairing things with Eco-poxy. Some of you might find this worth pursuing on your own, and I can answer any basic questions you may have.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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