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My First Bowl/gouge question

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Forum topic by Pauljk posted 03-28-2020 01:14 PM 537 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pauljk

15 posts in 117 days


03-28-2020 01:14 PM

I’m brand new to woodturning and I’m hooked, I am still trying to understand the differences between gouges, when I purchased my used delta 46-460 I also picked up a never used set of 8 vintage Marples sheffield chisels I’m confused about the type of gouges that I have. There are 3 in the set
I believe the small one is a bowl gouge? The other 2 are these roughing gouges or spindle gouges? Also I would like to purchase a new gouge or 2 and would like to lean on the experienced turners here for advice, I see U and V shaped gouges and fingernail and sweepback grinds any recommendations would be appreciated. I was unable to hollow out the bowl with the tools I have so there is a local shop that carries carter axe turning tools and I purchased a full size round carbide tipped tool, this thing worked great but I would really like to learn with traditional tools.

Here is the small bowl from a block of wood I made by glueing up some pieces of oak I had. It’s not much but its exciting to me seeing it’s my first one. I’m not sure if the bottom is correct? I’m located in RI and hoping to attend one of the local aaw chapter meetings but with everything canceled that’s on hold

Thank you, Paul


26 replies so far

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TheDane

5815 posts in 4403 days


#1 posted 03-28-2020 06:33 PM

I’m guessing these are 3/4”, 1/2” and 3/8”. Without seeing the profile of the flute (from the end of the tool) it is hard to tell for sure, but I doubt any of these would be classified as a bowl gouge. The two larger gouges certainly are not … they were forged from flat steel with a ‘tang’ that is inserted into the handle. The smaller one appears to be milled from a round rod, so it could be a bowl gouge.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Pauljk

15 posts in 117 days


#2 posted 03-28-2020 07:06 PM

Hi Gerry,
You are correct about the sizes, I’m attaching another picture, so would the 3/4” and 1/2” be a roughing gouge or spindle gouge.

Thank you, Paul

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TheDane

5815 posts in 4403 days


#3 posted 03-28-2020 11:40 PM

I’m attaching another picture, so would the 3/4” and 1/2” be a roughing gouge or spindle gouge

Probably spindle gouges … flip them over so we can see the inside of the flute.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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MrUnix

8013 posts in 2938 days


#4 posted 03-29-2020 12:07 AM

LOL – I have never learned the names of the various gouges. I just know which ones work best for me in certain circumstances and go for it. I’m sure that some of my home made tools may have some kind of name as well, but I will probably never know those either!!!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Aj2

2974 posts in 2537 days


#5 posted 03-29-2020 01:06 AM

They look like spindle gouges to me too. A bowl gouge will have a much deeper flute. As well as a roughing tool.

-- Aj

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Pauljk

15 posts in 117 days


#6 posted 03-29-2020 01:38 AM

maybe this picture will help.

The reason I’m curious about the type of gouges these are is so when I go to purchase a new one I know what i’m getting. If I buy a bowl gouge does this mean it can only be used to hollow out the bowl or it can be used for the whole project sorry for the silly questions it’s just confusing to me. Do I need a roughing gouge and a bowl gouge?

Thank you, Paul

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Nubsnstubs

1720 posts in 2470 days


#7 posted 03-29-2020 04:00 AM

I’ve been turning over 10 years, and have never had nor used a roughing gouge. So, apparently, it’s not a necessity. It probably would be good to have one. Figure out how to use what you have, and you’ll do ok. If you can’t get the hang of something someone else states is a must have, it makes for a bad turning experience….. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Aj2

2974 posts in 2537 days


#8 posted 03-29-2020 04:52 AM

Those don’t look like roughing gouges. A roughing gouge cannot be used inside for hollowing. It’s main use is to quickly turn the outside from square to round. Spindle turning.
Turning a bowl is different then spindle turning because the way grain is oriented.
My bowl gouges are quite a bit different then my spindle gouges.
The shape of the tool and the grind.
Good Luck

-- Aj

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Woodmaster1

1445 posts in 3327 days


#9 posted 03-29-2020 05:40 AM

Those look like spindle gouges. Shallow flute equals spindle gouge a deep flute is a bowl gouge.

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Pauljk

15 posts in 117 days


#10 posted 03-29-2020 01:00 PM

thank you all for the advice and information.

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simmo

80 posts in 4211 days


#11 posted 03-29-2020 01:20 PM

Use them for what ever you like and are comfortable with , the tanged tools were in use for hundreds of years before the milled hss gouges came along, as a newbie you will be drawn to the array of shiny expensive tools on display , make as much use of the ones you have , I fell into the tool begets tool trap years ago and ended up with loads of turning tools , I use a bowl gouge for roughing and spindle work , shock horror , now use 4 or 5 tools max for whatever they suit
C,

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mike02719

244 posts in 4525 days


#12 posted 03-29-2020 01:31 PM

After all this being said, your first bowl turned out great. Your lathe must have come with a chuck, which is fortunate. This pastime is very addictive and expensive so take your time to see what works for you. Hone your sharpening skills because sharp tools vastly outperform dull ones. This website and youtube have a wealth of information. Good luck.

-- Mike, Massachusetts

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Pauljk

15 posts in 117 days


#13 posted 03-29-2020 04:33 PM

This is very helpful I think I will only invest in a bowl gouge at this time and continue to use what I have to hone in my skills with the tools I have as suggested. I have a work sharp 3000 and made a jig for sharpening my lathe tools this works great so far, I use a digital angle finder for setting the angle of the grind I want.

Thank you all again, Paul

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Eric

204 posts in 977 days


#14 posted 03-29-2020 06:38 PM




The top chisel is a bowl gouge, the other two are tanged spindle gouges. Using a tanged gouge for bowls can have disasterous results. If the tanged gouge catches it can snap and the sharp end of the chisel goes flying. There’s a reason while bowl gouges are made from bar stock, strength and safety.

-- Eric

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Pauljk

15 posts in 117 days


#15 posted 03-29-2020 08:19 PM

Is it also unsafe to use these “spindle gouges” for shaping the bowl I don’t mean hollowing out the bowl but rounding the shape? I have had some catches with these and it’s not fun I guess it’s part learning.. I’m going to get a bowl gouge, I just need to figure out what to get. Is this a good bowl gouge, Crown 242EW 1/2” ELLSWORTH SIGNATURE GOUGE

Thank you, Paul

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

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