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One router bit for jointing and mortises?

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Forum topic by Spotcheck posted 03-23-2020 07:20 PM 383 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Spotcheck

38 posts in 3862 days


03-23-2020 07:20 PM

I’ve never been much of a router guy, other than handheld edge round-overs, etc. Not conversant in intricacies of bit styles.

I am creating a router setup primarily for jointing board edges. However, on occasion, I will want to use the router for mortises, without a bit change. 5/16” dia x 1-1/4” cut depth most likely, if that matters.

What style would be the best option [least worst option?] for this dual-function bit? Seems spiral-up would do it, and try whenever possible to joint “show side up”? The router is upside down so spiral up bit is dragging chips down, so cleanest cut will be top edge.

But – many people here know more about it than I so…..........?


7 replies so far

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AndyJ1s

485 posts in 1090 days


#1 posted 03-23-2020 08:15 PM

The same bit can be used for both, but I might want a bigger diameter bit for jointing, depending on how fast you want to feed stock while jointing.

-- Andy - Arlington TX

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Spotcheck

38 posts in 3862 days


#2 posted 03-23-2020 09:48 PM

Andy -

Good point. Had not considered that The 5/16 is based on typical mortise size for me. So the higher tip speed sacrificed by this smaller dia could be balanced by a more “leisurely” feed speed. Good grooming tip.

If you had your druthers, what dia would you use for jointing?

Thanks much

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Aj2

4225 posts in 3133 days


#3 posted 03-23-2020 11:29 PM

A router cannot really make a jointed edge. So don’t get your hopes up.
A jointed edge is a flat face to a square edge. Not kinda flat or square or mostly flat and square.
A accurate jointer does this quick and true.
Good Luck

-- Aj

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Spotcheck

38 posts in 3862 days


#4 posted 03-24-2020 12:03 AM

Aj2 – I understand. Made lotsa furniture over the decades. Sold my 8” jointer with Terminus head along with TS, BS, planer, mortiser, cyclone, etc., etc. when we moved out of the house into the condo.

I’ve got sources to S2S & thickness rough lumber. Then I’ll rip to width with a track-saw getup on the patio. And all that’s left is to joint edges. I can make a router table that is square. Not the same as big iron, but I’m comfortable it will be passable to the point that I’ll be the only one able to tell it’s lousy :)

Regards

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Aj2

4225 posts in 3133 days


#5 posted 03-24-2020 12:17 AM

Ok cool. Before I had a longbed jointer I used a hand plane. Some woods are just too difficult no matter what we do.
Good Luck

-- Aj

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Spotcheck

38 posts in 3862 days


#6 posted 03-24-2020 12:23 AM

Agreed.

The tragedy would occur were I to attempt to hand plane. The Horror! The Horror!

I’m also mindful of putting too much lateral force on the bit, but I don’t know if that’s a legit concern or not. I plan for a moveable outfeed fence with shims in 0.015” increments.

thnx

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tvrgeek

2304 posts in 2985 days


#7 posted 03-24-2020 01:03 PM

Agree, the router is not the best jointer. But if you must,

With an off-set out-fence, there should be no force on the bit. You would only be talking 1/16 or so off in a pass at most.

Depending on your track saw and blade, it may do better by itself.

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