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Craftsman 113.298761 Help

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Forum topic by nealb129 posted 03-12-2020 05:49 PM 746 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nealb129

5 posts in 261 days


03-12-2020 05:49 PM

Brand new here, looking to learn a bunch. I have couple of questions.

Just inherited the crafstman 113.298761 table saw. It does not come with a rip fence, or the splitter, blade guard, and anti kickback pawl. I have done a little research and I’m having a hard time finding a direct bolt on rip fence. Some reviews say certain fences are direct bolt on and others say no. I would like to keep the fence in the ~$200 range if possible. So does anyone know of any direct bolt on fences?

I’m also looking to find the splitter, blade guard and kickback pawl. Any idea where the cheapest prices would be for those items?

I plan on cleaning up the table and the guts of it.

Are replacement parts or upgrades still attainable for this saw?

Thank you for the help


11 replies so far

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nealb129

5 posts in 261 days


#1 posted 03-13-2020 10:06 AM

Bump

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tvrgeek

1055 posts in 2565 days


#2 posted 03-13-2020 12:14 PM

https://www.searspartsdirect.com/manual/51vyla48hn-000247/craftsman-113298761-table-saw
https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/51vyla48hn-000247/craftsman-113298761-table-saw-parts
Google is your friend. That will get you numbers. ( all the parts are NLA from Sears) There are some resellers who have parts.

It is a shame as they work quite well but the original splitter and guard are total crap ( I have the later Ridgid version) . You can make a zero clearance insert with a MicroJig splitter or various DIY splitters. Inconvenient, but safer than the original design. The guard and pawls are so bad, I tried to use them once and tossed them in the attic. I use the original splitter after some modifications when I can, but I have had kickback of thin stock what went under it.

The second thing is the fence is really poor. You don’t want the original. A decent aftermarket fence costs more than the saw is worth. You can spend $250 or so on a fence minimum. Good ones cost a lot more. It will likely require drilling some holes, not direct bolt on. If the fence does not remain absolutely square to the blade every time it is adjusted, it is too dangerous to use.

Another $35 on a Micro-Jig, splitters and $30 on a ZCI and have a saw that is sort of safer than when they shipped it. You need a good crosscut and a good rip blade. You need that for any saw, along with a variety of push blocks and sticks, feather boards, and decent miter gauge. Then build a sled. Always use a crosscut sled when you can.

My advice it to take it to the dump an look for a newer job-side size or larger saw built after 2009 so it has a true riving knife and one with a fence that can remain true to the blade to reduce the risk of kickback. Don’t go table top size as they scare me more than anything. Underpowered saws will tempt you to force things and that is quite dangerous.

Unless you intend on using it outside in a breeze, you have not factored in the cost of a dust collection system. As dangerous as it is for your fingers, you can live without fingers, but not without lungs.

Hate to be this discouraging. Tough to get a tool that looks good, but costs more to make it work than it is worth and is still quite dangerous. Well, all table saws are quite dangerous, but riving knife and good fence combined are a big part of doing what you can. Proper procedures and ever diligent care are the other half.

FWIW, I plan on replacing my Ridgid for a newer one as soon as I can get my Triumph off the jack stands so I can get it into my workshop. Fortunately, parts for a 40 year old limited production car are more available than table saws, but I do occasionally have to wait for shipping from England.

I have been off and on woodworking for 50 years, until a dozen or so years ago used a RAS. Scared me several times, but I survived. I got a table-top saw from a yard sale for $50. Used it once and it went in the trash. So bought the lower end contractor saw not understanding all the issues. Now I am looking to buy a saw for the third time. Expensive.

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ChefHDAN

1780 posts in 3765 days


#3 posted 03-13-2020 12:53 PM

Neal, your saw was sold under different badges. Rigid TS2424 & TS3612 parts will fit on your saw. I have the fence and rails from the TS3650 on my TS3612, they work fine with no issues. Your best bet is going to be if you can get lucky and someone puts a fence up on CL after they have upgraded their fence, or if you can find a full TS to buy for parts. Otherwise you’re looking at $350 & up to buy fence & rails, when many of the economy contractor saws are selling with current features for $500 to $600.

-Good Luck!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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PaulDoug

2394 posts in 2619 days


#4 posted 03-13-2020 03:09 PM

This is the fence system I put on my old Craftsman saw. I loved it. It is still on the say, which now belongs to my son-in-law.

http://www.mulecab.com/M1025Rip.html

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

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nealb129

5 posts in 261 days


#5 posted 03-13-2020 10:32 PM

Thanks for the replies… now I’m leaning more toward saving some more money and getting a new saw..

if you have everything you need, then is the craftsman a reliable saw?

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homestd

18 posts in 809 days


#6 posted 03-14-2020 04:08 AM

I have been using my Craftsman 113.298090 for over 30 years. The original fence leaves much to be desired, but I have learned to work with it. Any spinning blade or cutter is extremely dangerous and must be approached as such. Other than that, it has been reliable and predictable.

-- Mother is the necessity of most invention.

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ChefHDAN

1780 posts in 3765 days


#7 posted 03-14-2020 11:30 AM



Thanks for the replies… now I’m leaning more toward saving some more money and getting a new saw..
if you have everything you need, then is the craftsman a reliable saw?
- nealb129

My Rigid TS3612 is essentially the same saw as your C-Man. I bought it as a floor demo model and since the rails were messed up the tool manager opened a new TS3650 and gave me the fence & rails from it. It’s been in use for over 15 years and while a nice big cabinet saw would be great the saw I have does everything I need it to do.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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nealb129

5 posts in 261 days


#8 posted 03-14-2020 05:10 PM



This is the fence system I put on my old Craftsman saw. I loved it. It is still on the say, which now belongs to my son-in-law.

http://www.mulecab.com/M1025Rip.html

- PaulDoug

What kind of modifications did you have to make for it to fit your craftsman?

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toolie

2193 posts in 3544 days


#9 posted 03-14-2020 09:59 PM



Thanks for the replies… now I’m leaning more toward saving some more money and getting a new saw..

if you have everything you need, then is the craftsman a reliable saw?

- nealb129

Those 113 C-man table saws were built by Emerson Electric in the USA. I have two of them, one a C-man and he other, its cousin, a ridgid 2412. They are quite reliable, so much so that I got a 3hp unisaw for free, rehabbed it and opted to sell it so I could keep both of my Emerson built 10” CI table saws. The C-man has a Delta T2 fence and is really dialed in. Both saws do whatever I need to do, they just don’;t do it as fast and as easily as a cabinet saw. But I’m a hobbyist and rushing isn’t part of my workflow. There are tsquare fences that are adaptable to the saw you have. If its got a dual voltage motor, convert it to 220 if you have that available, get a good fence, take your time aligning the blade to one of the table’s miter slots and align the fence to the same miter slot, get a good blade and go make sawdust.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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JIMMIEM

83 posts in 1757 days


#10 posted 03-15-2020 01:32 PM

I have a Craftsman 113. ts that I bought in the late 1970’s. I installed a Delta T2 fence on it, added PALS ( blade alignment aids), link belt, and new pulleys. The Delta T3 fence is available at HD and Lowes for $219. The Delta rails have to be re-drilled to match the hole pattern in the table saw. The Delta fence has worked very well.
As others have said, if you have the $ then buy the best tool that you can afford. You can probably spruce the 113. up for less than $300. The big draw of a new tool is the built in riving knife.

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PaulDoug

2394 posts in 2619 days


#11 posted 03-15-2020 02:18 PM

This is the fence system I put on my old Craftsman saw. I loved it. It is still on the say, which now belongs to my son-in-law.

http://www.mulecab.com/M1025Rip.html

- PaulDoug

What kind of modifications did you have to make for it to fit your craftsman?

- nealb129

Actually I don’t remember having to make any modifications. If I did it would have been just to drill some holes in a rail, but if I remember correctly, you bolt some brackets to existing holes in the saw and the fence rail bolt to those brackets. It was very easy to mount it.

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

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