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Has anyone used oil based poly in a three part danish oil?

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Forum topic by DocSavage45 posted 03-11-2020 02:00 AM 728 views 1 time favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DocSavage45

8956 posts in 3612 days


03-11-2020 02:00 AM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing walnut maple

Hey LJ’s!

Another finishing question.
Background: In past I’ve mixed oil based poly with linseed oil and paint thinner and added it to exterior oil stain. Worked well.

Doing some art boxes and I made my own danish using three part mixture with tung oil, and I had to purchase some varnish to be true to the Sam Maloof process.

When mixing it I though how would it work if I used polyurethane varnish ?

Wondering if anyone else has tried this and what the results were?

Thanks for your thoughts and comments and experience!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher


19 replies so far

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SMP

2100 posts in 675 days


#1 posted 03-11-2020 03:27 AM

I’ve mixed some with minwax poly and it worked fine on some boxes i used it on.

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DocSavage45

8956 posts in 3612 days


#2 posted 03-11-2020 04:10 AM

Good to hear. Quicker than regular varnish drying?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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OSU55

2646 posts in 2759 days


#3 posted 03-11-2020 12:26 PM

No I havent. I find just using thinned poly and applying it the same way – flood on, keep wet for 10 min, wipe off gives the same look as danish oil but dries faster and is more durable. Comparing to otc danish oil.

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Lazyman

5382 posts in 2157 days


#4 posted 03-11-2020 12:36 PM

I tried the 3-part mixture once and it took too long to dry so used the minwax wipe-on poly instead with better results. When I want a more tradition (non-poly) finish, I use Tried and True Varnish oil. It takes longer to cure and requires more coats than the wipe-on poly for example but I love the results.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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doubleDD

9459 posts in 2812 days


#5 posted 03-11-2020 01:01 PM

Hi Tom. Lately I’ve been doing a 2 part mix using oil based poly or varnish. I mix anywhere from 50-50 to 1/3 mineral spirits to 2/3 poly/ I use old sandpaper to rub the finish in till it’s almost completely gone. Then wipe off any remainder. It leaves a baby smooth finish and is almost completely dry after wiping. The sand paper helps fill in any pores in the wood and helps with defects. This finish has been my new go to lately. I haven’t done it with any oil so no comment on that.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

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Gene Howe

12173 posts in 4198 days


#6 posted 03-11-2020 01:45 PM

For a wipe on finish, I like to mix Watco with oilbased poly @ a 50/50 ratio, adding about 25% more poly with each successive coat. The final coat, usually the fifth, is pure poly, sprayed on. Time consuming but a great finish.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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DocSavage45

8956 posts in 3612 days


#7 posted 03-11-2020 09:26 PM

OSU55, Dave, Gene, and Nathan,

Thanks for your input. I think as I start to make more boxes( I have a few I’m making for my family out of 1945 pine) I will try the poly in the mix.

I’ve always wanted to try the old Sam Maloof mix known as Danish oil. Making my own and testing out various finishes will give me knowledge from experience as you have done.

Thanks for checking me out!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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SMP

2100 posts in 675 days


#8 posted 03-12-2020 03:01 AM

I recommend going to walmart if possible and getting that multi pack of mason jars and a sharpie. Then get some wood cutoffs and masking tape. Mask off a few inch intervals so you have a bunch of sections to sample with your various mixes. And use a few of the woods you normally use. Its interesting to see how the different amberings and tones affect different wood colors and tones and how some finishes bring out more or less chattanoyance etc.

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Kelly

3006 posts in 3713 days


#9 posted 03-12-2020 03:28 AM

My rules, for decades, has been – if it mixes, it’s fair game.

Add to that a bit of knowledge gained from others:

More oil means a more flexible surface, but less durability;

Less oil means a harder surface, so less flex, but more durability; and,

More flexibility means more tolerant of wood movement due to moisture.

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DocSavage45

8956 posts in 3612 days


#10 posted 03-12-2020 03:42 AM

Kelly,

Lol! And good rule of thumb!

What about tactile and visual?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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DocSavage45

8956 posts in 3612 days


#11 posted 03-12-2020 03:43 AM

SMP,

Had similar thinking.

My current available woods are ash, maple, walnut and pine.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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Kelly

3006 posts in 3713 days


#12 posted 03-12-2020 03:59 AM

It’s, to my knowledge, been a “what you put in is what you get out” thing. If you use clear, you get clear. If it ain’t lumpy, it won’t be bumpy (especially if you run the brush up and down your cyclone fence to knock the nibs out….).

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DocSavage45

8956 posts in 3612 days


#13 posted 03-12-2020 04:02 AM

To bad they don’t have mems on LJ’s! LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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pottz

9845 posts in 1753 days


#14 posted 03-12-2020 02:43 PM

ive used the maloof mix for years 1/3 of blo,tung and satin oil based poly and love the finish and ease of use.i figure if it was good enough for the worlds most renown woodworker on 25 thousand dollar rockers it’s good enough for me-lol.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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bilyo

1111 posts in 1872 days


#15 posted 03-17-2020 11:09 PM

The formula, as I learned it, is 1/3 oil, 1/3 varnish, 1/3 mineral spirits. For oil, you can use either linseed oil or, if you want a lighter color, tung oil. For varnish, you can use alkyd oil varnish (if you can still find it) or polyurethane. Of course, mineral spirits is mineral spirits except for the odorless stuff. I haven’t used the latter but, haven’t heard or read anything good about it. Some say they don’t use this finish because it takes too long to dry. Try adding a small amount of japan drier to the mix. It will be ready to sand and apply another coat over night. As mentioned above, the idea is to apply multiple very thin coats. I always use a folded piece of blue shop towel to apply it. Also as mentioned above, you can rub in the first coat. I always use 300-400 grit wet/dry sandpaper for this. The idea here is to work up a slurry of fine sanding dust and finish working it into the pores of the wood until the finish starts to stiffen up. Beautiful finish.

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