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Forum topic by TechTeacher posted 03-02-2020 08:05 PM 919 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TechTeacher

53 posts in 3686 days


03-02-2020 08:05 PM

Looking for suggestions on how to deal with what I consider hobby lumber. Pieces that are too unique or large to throw out but have gotten out of hand. I have a sawmill here in central Wisconsin and saw mostly as a hobby and for some construction and barn restoration projects. It is pretty common to get a decent looking board that is not quite 8 foot or has a chunk missing. I hate to throw these on the slab pile, but struggle with space and storage of shorts. Like everyone my time is precious and can’t see listing individual boards for sale. I tried listing a pile on craigslist a couple years ago, It just resulted in a million questions. At which point I gave them to my neighbor who is into woodworking. He was ticked because I didn’t have time to help him load his free lumber. No more free stuff for him. Anyone faced with this problem come up with a solution, or just continue to throw on slab pile?


15 replies so far

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

2849 posts in 838 days


#1 posted 03-02-2020 09:19 PM

I wish I had your “problem” :))

-- WWBBJ: It is better to be interesting and wrong, than boring and right.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

3178 posts in 1879 days


#2 posted 03-02-2020 09:22 PM

That’s the problem with shorts and odds, you need to sell in bulk as-is for it to be cost effective. Building storage and paying the crew to sort and stack costs more than the pieces are worth so they only have value as a random pile.

Sell by the hundred weight – they load. Sell for half the bf $ you get for full boards and hope for the best. Palletize 100# stacks and tell ‘em to bring a pallet jack!

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Madmark2

3178 posts in 1879 days


#3 posted 03-02-2020 09:23 PM

That’s the problem with shorts and odds, you need to sell in bulk as-is for it to be cost effective. Building storage and paying the crew to sort and stack costs more than the pieces are worth so they only have value as a random pile.

Sell by the hundred weight – they load. Sell for half the bf $ you get for full boards and hope for the best. Palletize 100# stacks and tell ‘em to bring a pallet jack!

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Walker's profile

Walker

470 posts in 1763 days


#4 posted 03-02-2020 09:58 PM

If you’re into donating, perhaps there is a local high school shop program who would take them off your hands. Do those exist anymore?

Another idea, though I’m not sure how realistic this is… I recently went to an auction where a retiring cabinet maker was selling his entire shop of tools and such, including a large selection of hardwood. Larger boards were in groups of 3 or 4, while smaller pieces were palletized as Mark suggests. Out of 300 lots, about 50 of them were piles of wood. If there is an auction house near you, perhaps you could inquire about any upcoming tool auctions they could add your stuff to.

-- ~Walker

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

9272 posts in 1865 days


#5 posted 03-02-2020 10:08 PM

I’m seeing no time, and no space. What has you so busy? If it is making money, you can build a bigger place to keep the wood.

Sounds like you see it’s something of value, or you wouldn’t be asking, you’d just burn it up. Have you thought about making a job to help the economy, and give one of the remaining unemployed a shot at the dream. Hire a kid to sell your stashwood online. A piece at a time if that is how it sells best. Pay him a chunk, and whats left is called profit. Or getting some of that value you saw in the first place back.

-- Think safe, be safe

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bondogaposis

6069 posts in 3642 days


#6 posted 03-02-2020 10:21 PM

I wish you lived close to me.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

3346 posts in 1894 days


#7 posted 03-02-2020 11:45 PM


Have you thought about making a job to help the economy, and give one of the remaining unemployed a shot at the dream. Hire a kid to sell your stashwood online. A piece at a time if that is how it sells best. Pay him a chunk, and whats left is called profit. Or getting some of that value you saw in the first place back.

- therealSteveN

That’s a great “thinking out of the box” idea!!

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2684 posts in 4084 days


#8 posted 03-03-2020 02:11 AM

What town are you close to? What species do you have?

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

19949 posts in 2429 days


#9 posted 03-03-2020 02:55 AM

I like to have a selection of “hobby wood” around for small projects. A local mill house donates their drops and scrap pieces that are of useable size to the Habitat Restore so I stop in there once a month or so and grab a few pieces if there are any good looking ones. I’d be willing to buy directly from them if they sold that way too…

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View Walker's profile

Walker

470 posts in 1763 days


#10 posted 03-03-2020 03:59 AM



If you re into donating, perhaps there is a local high school shop program who would take them off your hands. Do those exist anymore?

I just read your profile, I guess woodshop does still exist!

-- ~Walker

View them700project's profile

them700project

306 posts in 2309 days


#11 posted 03-03-2020 01:33 PM

-Are these pieces dry? If they are dry I would think there would be no problem getting rid of them
-If their wet and you have no space you still may be able to find someone, like me, that would take it.

If they are dry and decent wood species
quick projects you can offload easy.(birdhouses/cutting boards/ mailboxes/etc)
Epoxy projects seem to sell for decent prices if you made some wall art/tables/charcuterie boards

If they are undesirable make stickers/firewood/

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

778 posts in 1910 days


#12 posted 03-03-2020 01:56 PM

A cabinet shop near me sells pallets of cutoffs and rejects for $50 each. They will load with a fork lift, but you are on your own for hand loading. My favorite source. They have a standing ad on craig’s list in the materials section. I doubt they make any money on the deal, but it does reduce their waste load.

-- Sawdust Maker

View TechTeacher's profile

TechTeacher

53 posts in 3686 days


#13 posted 03-04-2020 07:40 PM

Thanks for all the input. I get inspired by projects shown on lumber jocks. I help students with projects and we utilize lumberjocks for project ideas from time to time. Looking at some really awesome small projects got me thinking about the wood I had thrown into my boiler the night before. Comments here have inspired me to give utilizing or selling shorts another try. Perhaps I should build another building just for shorts. Sometimes even firewood is hard to throw in the fire, currently there is a small red oak burl laying outside the woodshed that I didn’t have the heart to throw in. Perhaps bundling into groups would work, probably has to be more about natural resources than about the $.
Thanks for the inspiration…

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

9272 posts in 1865 days


#14 posted 03-04-2020 08:07 PM

I occasionally see comments about throwing out, or burning wood scraps. I suppose right at the gist is a definition. What is a scrap. Now if you are talking splinters, then yeah, that’s crazy keeping splinters. but I call scrap an offcut, a smallish piece of wood that I probably couldn’t do an entire project with.

So if that offcut is 12” wide, and 9” long then it is an average size of all wood sold. I’m told by a guy who owns a fairly active lumber yard, that your 10’ board x 12” width isn’t the biggest portion of wood sold anymore. America has gone smaller, much smaller.

You have to consider a LOT of pen blanks are sold every year, and if you open that up to the 1×1 1 and 1/2×1 and 1/2 in 5, 12, 18” lengths, then you are talking a lot of the wood many woodworkers buy. So if that 12×9 x 3/4 piece of offcut is diced up, it could be several pieces that someone would love to have.

It makes for a case of making one large, then 5 or 6 small projects, so you can use up all the wood. Otherwise figure out a storage concept. Smalls are $$$$$$$$. Pretty or unusual smalls are big business.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1560 posts in 4051 days


#15 posted 03-04-2020 08:16 PM

A millwork operation used to have a small open shed and stacked these pieces there. Anyone could come by and pick through them and buy them for a great price. Alas, the shed is gone these days. You might want to try this and place a notice at some local woodworking and hardware stores this is available.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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