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Unisaw Parts Discontinued or Obsolete....Why?

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Forum topic by rkruz posted 02-22-2020 03:57 PM 745 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rkruz

49 posts in 68 days


02-22-2020 03:57 PM

Topic tags/keywords: unisaw

Im looking at parts for the newest generation Unisaw 36-L552 or 36-L300 and almost every one I want has been discontinued and no longer available from every parts site Ive looked at …. except Delta which doesnt work so I cant view any parts at all. Parts like: Blade Guard, Anti-kickback, Power Switch, Arbor, Arbor Nut and more.
So Im wondering if even the Delta site doesnt list the new Unisaw has this last generation of Unisaw been discontinued?


14 replies so far

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

1723 posts in 2633 days


#1 posted 02-22-2020 09:10 PM

Try eReplacementParts.com

-- Petey

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7849 posts in 2883 days


#2 posted 02-22-2020 10:04 PM

Because Delta was sold in 2011 to the overseas company Chang Type Industrial. Co. And before that, Black and Decker decimated their parts stock after receiving a 20 year supply from Pentair (who themselves destroyed most of the castings and parts drawings after producing said 20 year supply).

In many cases, it is much easier to find parts for a 50 year old machine than it is for one made two years ago. And Delta is not the only company with the same issue.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

5232 posts in 1258 days


#3 posted 02-22-2020 10:51 PM

In the past it was a lot of.

You can check with your state’s consumer-protection agency, but there are no federal laws that require a manufacturer to provide parts for any length of time. Most companies just do it because it’s good for business—especially repeat business.

However that was back when thinking. Today we are a walk away society, and after something isn’t useful, off to the landfill with ya….

Add to that these companies buying off old tool giants, just for name recognition only, don’t care about older models, they want you to buy the new model, the one they make.

I agree with Brad, buy em 50 + and you can find parts, 2 years ago to 20 years out, you can get kinda screwed in the replacement part market. I used to flip a lot of stationary power tools and quit when I kept running into walls.

Plus it’s not like you can buy one junker, and use it as a parts machine. Most of the parts last until they rust to dust. It’s the 2% of parts on any one model, that were a trash design back then, and go bad on virtually every tool of that model. Try that parts machine thing, and soon you’ll be that nutty old guy with his own private junkyard. 50 TS hulks over here, 20 Jointers over there, all useless because that part is already gone.

-- Think safe, be safe

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rkruz

49 posts in 68 days


#4 posted 02-22-2020 11:14 PM

Thanks for the insights. Screwed by the dime a dozen online MBAs sounds like. And here I thought I was upgrading from my Powermatic 63 (which Ive had for 25 years) and was good idea to buy newer generation table saw. its been so frustrating working on this saw, Ive a notion once I get the Unisaw running, sell it and go back to the contractor saw I have or get a Powermatic Cabinet Saw.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7849 posts in 2883 days


#5 posted 02-23-2020 12:05 AM

Thanks for the insights. Screwed by the dime a dozen online MBAs sounds like. And here I thought I was upgrading from my Powermatic 63 (which Ive had for 25 years) and was good idea to buy newer generation table saw. its been so frustrating working on this saw, Ive a notion once I get the Unisaw running, sell it and go back to the contractor saw I have or get a Powermatic Cabinet Saw.
- rkruz

That Unisaw was a huge step up from your previous Powermatic. And IIRC, your arbor/arbor nut damage was a result of your own actions and should be easily rectified. Arbor nuts are everywhere – they have been the same since the late 30’s. Messed up threads can easily be repaired using a thread or needle file. Most other stuff can be easily found at your local hardware store, aftermarket supplier or even Amazon in many cases. Not sure what you did to require a ‘power switch’, but Delta didn’t make the one on your machine and is easily replaceable.

Have you tried contacting Delta directly? Proprietary parts for a machine that is still in production should be available. I don’t know what happened to their parts site, but it’s been broken for a while now – so a phone call will probably be needed or an e-mail at the very least. All other standard parts can be obtained from dozens of sources other than Delta.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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rkruz

49 posts in 68 days


#6 posted 02-23-2020 01:04 AM

Your hearing my frustration over my own actions ie screwup.
The arbor nut was a chore to find. Hardware stores, even the specialty hardware distribution did not have anything that large, 5/8 with 28 tpi RH. Tried a narrow thread file to clean up threads, no work. Tried a Lang thread restorer no success. A die cost twice what an new arbor cost. I did find a tap for 5/8-28 on Amazon and was able to clean up the nut threads with it. The arbor threads still messed up but I cant tell why even under magnification. Just now I was able to use the nut like a die and back and forth with WD40 clean up the arbor too so Im back in business.The top thread must have been pushed down because thats where the it was hanging up. To clarify, this is not the blade nut, this is the nut for the other end on the bearing, maybe thats why its not so common.

Regarding Delta Parts Support and Unisaw parts in general:
I as you stated Delta online site for parts does not work. When calling Delta support they said the site hasnt worked in a long time with no insight when it would be and I should call a hardware store in NOrth Carolina that is supporting them.
FYI that Delta Parts support store is Leneave Supply 1-800-442-2303.

Leneave said the arbor nut had been back ordered for months and had no idea when to expect it. The arbor PN listed in the Delta parts blowout and all parts houses is also shown as obsolete but somehow I discovered a replacement PN and they had it in stock at the Delta warehouse. Its been so frustrating because for this current in production table saw there are so many parts that show as obsolete and discontinued such as Blade cover, anti-kickback pawls, power switch all show as obsolete or discontinued on every online parts site. Thats why I asked about the currentness of this newer Unisaw generation because ultimately I got this saw to avoid these obsolescence issues..

Thanks again for the tips and insights. Its helped alot!

Its been a frustrating journey but maybe once I get it running and use it Ill feel it was worth it.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2799 posts in 2482 days


#7 posted 02-23-2020 01:04 AM

-- Aj

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13144 posts in 3064 days


#8 posted 02-23-2020 05:47 AM



Leneave said the arbor nut had been back ordered for months and had no idea when to expect it.
- rkruz

I posted a link to a replacement arbor nut and jam nut but you never responded
https://www.lumberjocks.com/topics/308133

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7849 posts in 2883 days


#9 posted 02-23-2020 06:34 AM

To clarify, this is not the blade nut, this is the nut for the other end on the bearing, maybe thats why its not so common.
[...]
I did find a tap for 5/8-28 on Amazon and was able to clean up the nut threads with it.
- rkruz

Ah… different beast entirely. Parts diagram has it listed as “Special Nut” P/N: 902012009847S, and it appears to be available at a bunch of different places for about $8. Guess it doesn’t matter much now though :)

BTW: That arbor nut is the same as used on all Unisaws dating back to at least the 40’s… it is the same one I have on my Unisaw built in 1983, although the parts list hyphenated the p/n (ie: 902-01-200-9847). It is by no means special other than in its name!

I am curious as to just how many parts are identical between the new and old Uinsaw design… I’m willing to bet that it shares quite a bit more than many would expect.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3454 posts in 1906 days


#10 posted 02-23-2020 03:33 PM

Brad, speaking of which, do you have a suggested list of replacement parts for a Unisaw (late 90’s) that should be kept as spares? I’m thinking of smaller stuff like a spare arbor, etc. Things that are available now but may vanish in the future or have incredibly long lead times to acquire?

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5602 posts in 2993 days


#11 posted 02-23-2020 04:36 PM

Because in my opinion today’s unisaw isn’t really Delta. It’s been sold so many times now it’s just another over seas clone.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

2716 posts in 2178 days


#12 posted 02-24-2020 02:24 AM

I’m willing to bet that it shares quite a bit more (with older models) than many would expect.
- MrUnix

+1

IMHO – Keeping spare parts for a tool used in your hobby has little merit. The cost of parts, and cost of inventory far exceeds the time value gained by having spares ready to return the tool to service. Spare parts are not that hard to find with a little knowledge.

Now if your TS is used 8 hours a day in a business to make money, then downtime gets expensive; and it warrants having some spares available.

Which ones would I have in my business?
- Blades (rip, crosscut, and specialty if used)
- Belts
- Plastic scale parts (those annoying clear pieces with red line to set cut dimensions)
- Zero Clearance Insert blanks (ZCI)
- Arbor wrench
- Arbor nut
- power switch (if separate from starter)
- Maybe bearings – motor and arbor (unless you can get them locally delivered, or via a short drive in less than 2 hours)
- replacement dust collection connection fittings in case of accident

If a tool is used non-stop 24/7, then would add these parts:
- motor
- arbor
- pulleys
- motor starter

Finding replacement parts for any discontinued wood working tool that has been cloned by overseas mfg is relatively easy. Stop thinking I need OEM parts and look for clone machines made by same mfg. Example: There are many Grizzly G1023 models where parts fit Delta saws. Grizzly is also a potential source for odd ball nuts/bolt sizes not commonly sold by Fastenal, McMaster, MSC, or Grainger.

Another key to finding OEM replacement parts is calling the OEM and not taking no for answer. For critical parts like arbor, they often have replacement option- but it may not be direct fit. Which means you need different spacers, nuts, etc.

Another tip regarding electrical components: There is nothing magical about the OEM parts. OEM do not make the electrical bits, they buy off shelf parts. Magnetic motor starter(s) all work same way. Sure you might have drill some new mounting holes, or buy a new box to hold the switch, but can grab a new switch or starter for much less than OEM prices and tool will work same.

YMMV

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3454 posts in 1906 days


#13 posted 02-24-2020 05:10 PM

Good info Captain 8^)

From your list I can safely say nothing there would stop me from rigging something up or using what I already have in abundance (i.e. blades). The only thing on the list is an arbor. You know the deal, bearing suddenly starts howling, remove arbor to replace, spot crack/bend that destroyed the arbor in the first place, yada, yada, yada!

Just don’t want to be down for weeks waiting on an obsolete part.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

2716 posts in 2178 days


#14 posted 02-25-2020 12:27 AM


You know the deal, bearing suddenly starts howling, remove arbor to replace, spot crack/bend that destroyed the arbor in the first place, yada, yada, yada!
- splintergroup

Sorry, do not know this deal?

Am always puzzled when folks say the arbor casting is cracked? Have rebuilt Unisaw arbors many times, have never damaged one, nor had one crack during normal use. Maybe I am lucky? Rebuilding an arbor does require the proper tools (pullers, press, proper sized sleeves), and certainly don’t want to drop it on the concrete floor.

Bearing noise is very subtle, and easily overlooked if not aware of ‘normal’ machine noises. Due experience, can walk up to most any TS (or motor driven fan) and tell by sound of start up/shut down if there is an ignored bearing issue, long before bearing begins to howl, or breaks something.

Now if some ‘monkey’ drops a full stack of lumber on top of exposed blade and pressure breaks the arbor, that is another story. That is why each business owner needs to have it’s own spare parts methodology, and I listed what MY business would have for spares.

Silly monkey’s are also why I use a small hammer and perform a ping test on cast iron parts when buying a used machine, especially when used in commercial shop. If your hear a ‘clink’ and not typical ‘ring’ noise from solid cast iron, something is cracked/broken.

As always, YMMV

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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