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question about restoring hand plane

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Forum topic by wildwoodbybrianjohns posted 02-22-2020 10:17 AM 346 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wildwoodbybrianjohns

1101 posts in 220 days


02-22-2020 10:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: hand plane restoring hand tools

I inherited this plane from the guy I bought my house from. I know it isnt the best quality plane, there is some plastic on it, but I would like to be able to use it. It was probably made in Germany or Austria.

Anyway, question is, the blade is in really bad shape – so, should I try to sharpen it, or just buy a new iron for the plane?

If I was going to sharpen it, should I square it off on a grinder first, then go through the stages as I would with a chisel?

If I were to buy a new iron, can anyone recommend a maker/make?

Thanks for any input.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: If you tell the truth, you dont have to remember anything (S. Clemens) Edit: Now where is that darn pencil/ tape measure!


16 replies so far

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

282 posts in 1448 days


#1 posted 02-22-2020 11:20 AM

Sharpen it , you might be surpised how well it turns out.

View KYtoolsmith's profile

KYtoolsmith

134 posts in 533 days


#2 posted 02-22-2020 11:48 AM

Wow, don’t consider that a “cheap” plane. Yes probably a newer manufacturer of an old classic horn handled smoothing plane. Some hand plane users prefer the wood bodied planes. A bit fiddly to adjust, but capable of fine work. As to the iron, I would carefully grind back and attempt to flatten the back. It may be difficult to find a new iron. If getting a new iron, notice that this style plane usually has a much thicker iron than the double iron used on Bailey style iron bodied planes. For a maker of new irons, google “Hock plane irons”. They can make one if the size in both width and thickness is unusual. I have some Hock plane irons and have been very pleased.
Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1068 posts in 1223 days


#3 posted 02-22-2020 12:05 PM

Sharpen it. You’ll build the skill needed cause you don’t just sharpen blades once anyway.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View JayT's profile

JayT

6388 posts in 2884 days


#4 posted 02-22-2020 12:33 PM

I would grind back past the worst of the pitting, then flatten and sharpen. When grinding a blade back, do it at a 90 degree angle to help avoid burning the steel, then regrind the bevel.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

4767 posts in 1255 days


#5 posted 02-22-2020 12:55 PM

What JayT said. And if the blade is unrecoverable, but a new one from Ron Hock who almost certainly already makes what you need.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7850 posts in 3587 days


#6 posted 02-22-2020 01:06 PM

What does the chipper look like? How thick is the blade and the chipper?
In other words, additional pictures/images of the blade and/or chipper would help a lot in making any recommendations on sharpening and/or replacing.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Don W's profile

Don W

19540 posts in 3240 days


#7 posted 02-22-2020 01:19 PM

I think I would cut that back about 3/8” with a Dremel cut off wheel first. Keep dunking it in water to keep it cool.

But agree, grind it back somehow, keep it cool as you go and sharpen and use it.

Another option is grind it back far enough that the ruler trick will work. Then use the ruler trick until you sharpen past the Pits.

That’s a decent plane and once sharp will work really well.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

1101 posts in 220 days


#8 posted 02-22-2020 01:27 PM

Thanks for the replies. More photos. The blade is 4mm, and the chipper is about 21/2mm, thicknesses.

And if you notice in the last photo, look real close, it appears as though the wood base part is finger-jointed to the top part. I can see a spot where the joint has opened up a little bit.

There is no manufacturer stamp on the steel. I think the plane might be an URKO, but not sure.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: If you tell the truth, you dont have to remember anything (S. Clemens) Edit: Now where is that darn pencil/ tape measure!

View KYtoolsmith's profile

KYtoolsmith

134 posts in 533 days


#9 posted 02-22-2020 01:34 PM

Hmm… If that’s the way it was when you got it… That chip breaker is on the wrong side of the iron… Should be against the flat side, not the beveled side…
Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

1101 posts in 220 days


#10 posted 02-22-2020 03:52 PM



Hmm… If that s the way it was when you got it… That chip breaker is on the wrong side of the iron… Should be against the flat side, not the beveled side…
Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

- KYtoolsmith

Gotcha! That was the way I found it. Then again, I am a total noob when it comes to hand planes, last time I used one was in highschool shop class, like 100 years ago. Ima gonna learn, now.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: If you tell the truth, you dont have to remember anything (S. Clemens) Edit: Now where is that darn pencil/ tape measure!

View Fettler's profile

Fettler

206 posts in 2670 days


#11 posted 02-22-2020 04:08 PM

The plane iron doesn’t look bad from the photos. I’d start with a bath of evaporust and then Camilla oil to prevent reflashing. There’s likely a lot of pitting near the cutting edge and may require grinding like others mentioned.

If you buy a replacement iron it’ll likely be thicker and you may have to expand the throat. You’ll need a good plane file. Hock makes good irons but I’m partial to Veritas PM-V11 irons.

Also, don’t neglect the plane body. Some #0000 steel wool and a good wax should make it clean up nicely.

Overall though looks like a great plane

-- --Rob, Seattle, WA

View SMP's profile

SMP

1878 posts in 578 days


#12 posted 02-22-2020 04:16 PM

Grind past the pitting or see if the size of an ECE replacement iron will fit if you don’t want to have to grind it.
https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/primusjackandsmoothplanereplacementiron.aspx

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7850 posts in 3587 days


#13 posted 02-22-2020 05:55 PM



Hmm… If that s the way it was when you got it… That chip breaker is on the wrong side of the iron… Should be against the flat side, not the beveled side…
Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!
- KYtoolsmith

Gotcha! That was the way I found it. Then again, I am a total noob when it comes to hand planes, last time I used one was in highschool shop class, like 100 years ago. Ima gonna learn, now.
- wildwoodbybrianjohns

Great! Glad this will be an easy fix for you!

Welcome aboard, to Handplanes Addicts Anonymous

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

1101 posts in 220 days


#14 posted 02-22-2020 06:01 PM

Thanks guys. I will try to make this blade work, start with the bench grinder and so on. And I will flatten the carcass bottom and give some love to the wood as well.

I know Don knows his stuff, but I am not going to try and cut 3/8” off with a rotary tool, I will definitely screw that up.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: If you tell the truth, you dont have to remember anything (S. Clemens) Edit: Now where is that darn pencil/ tape measure!

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

663 posts in 1965 days


#15 posted 02-22-2020 08:58 PM

I agree with many others. Clean it, flatten the back and grind it to the correct angle.
Keep it cool during grinding so you don’t wuin the timper, (hardness).

Then continue sharing it on finer surfaces until you get a mirror finish.

There are great videos on line you can learn from.

On Stanley planes the first grind angle is 25 degrees, then a small 15 degree on the tip.

Keep us informed of you progress.

-- James E McIntyre

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