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Danish oil on pine

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Forum topic by SuzyQ222 posted 02-21-2020 08:57 PM 314 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SuzyQ222

33 posts in 39 days


02-21-2020 08:57 PM

I am thinking of using danish oil in instead of stain on my pine tv stand. I want to add some color but not a very dark color. I have the medium walnut but wondered how natural danish oil or the dark walnut would compare. Someone recommended if I’m going to add one of the colored danish oils then I should apply the natural first to avoid blotching. Is this step necessary? Will it minimize or prevent blotching?

As far as how to apply and number of coats, how to sand, and wait time….... I have heard all different recommendations and it’s overwhelming! Right now on hand, I have watco danish oil in medium walnut and minwax wipe on polyurethane. I had thought of using either of these or both, but want to get more info and see some pics if possible. Thanks! This is my table.


14 replies so far

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tvrgeek

549 posts in 2320 days


#1 posted 02-21-2020 10:28 PM

Test, oil or poly may be too yellow for you. Water based poly won’t change the color as much but not as tough.

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SMP

1876 posts in 577 days


#2 posted 02-21-2020 10:41 PM

Personally I would avoid the colored DO on pine. The pigments show up almost like fine dirt. Better off using a dye or stain first. And definitely use a blotch control product first. Either the Charles Neil glue/water type or the canned from the big box store.

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SuzyQ222

33 posts in 39 days


#3 posted 02-22-2020 12:11 AM



Test, oil or poly may be too yellow for you. Water based poly won t change the color as much but not as tough.

- tvrgeek


I tested the poly and it didn’t change the color at all. It just made it shinier. The medium looked OK but very light.

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SuzyQ222

33 posts in 39 days


#4 posted 02-22-2020 12:14 AM



Personally I would avoid the colored DO on pine. The pigments show up almost like fine dirt. Better off using a dye or stain first. And definitely use a blotch control product first. Either the Charles Neil glue/water type or the canned from the big box store.

- SMP


The stain was so unpredictable. I kept trying it out and each time it had different issues. I wanted to stick with something simpler and more natural looking.

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Rich

5346 posts in 1260 days


#5 posted 02-22-2020 12:31 AM


The stain was so unpredictable. I kept trying it out and each time it had different issues. I wanted to stick with something simpler and more natural looking.

- SuzyQ222

Just be sure to do test boards before you apply anything to the final project. That’ll save you a whole lot of headaches.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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SuzyQ222

33 posts in 39 days


#6 posted 02-22-2020 12:45 AM

I always do test boards, but they never seem to come out quite the same

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Walker

256 posts in 1143 days


#7 posted 02-22-2020 12:46 AM

The watco “natural” danish oil is clear. IMO it is one of the least noticeable finishes available. In other words if you want to change the look of the wood as little as possible, this it the way to go. Or other danish oils with less additives like Tried and True brand.

I find it easy to work with…dump in on (“flood” is the word on the label), even out with a cloth or paper towel. Wait 15 minutes and wipe off any excess. Let dry. Between coats I use #0000 steel wool.

-- ~Walker

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SuzyQ222

33 posts in 39 days


#8 posted 02-22-2020 12:51 AM

If I want to add a little color with the medium, would it make a difference if I used the natural first like one person suggested to me to avoid blotching? I have also heard that you are supposed to wait before adding a second or third third coat and sand in between? Do you have any pics of it used on pine?

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SMP

1876 posts in 577 days


#9 posted 02-22-2020 01:17 AM



I always do test boards, but they never seem to come out quite the same

- SuzyQ222

If all of your test boards are coming out different i have some questions for you:

1. Are you sand ing everything with the same grit sandpaper and what grit?

2. Do you follow the same sanding schedule with all pieces? (ie 80, then 120, then 150 etc)

3. Are you using a blotch control/conditioner and which one? And are you shaking it well?

Besides those questions I will say this. With pine i have had the most consistent luck with General Finishes oil based gel stain. You don’t need to use a conditioner with it, and 2 coats will self even everything out.

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kajunkraft

186 posts in 2881 days


#10 posted 02-22-2020 01:32 AM

+1 on the General Finishes oil based gel stain.

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SuzyQ222

33 posts in 39 days


#11 posted 02-22-2020 01:35 AM


I always do test boards, but they never seem to come out quite the same

- SuzyQ222

If all of your test boards are coming out different i have some questions for you:

1. Are you sand ing everything with the same grit sandpaper and what grit?

2. Do you follow the same sanding schedule with all pieces? (ie 80, then 120, then 150 etc)

3. Are you using a blotch control/conditioner and which one? And are you shaking it well?
Thanks for your suggestions, but I was hoping someone could answer my questions about the danish oil since that is what I have at the moment.

Besides those questions I will say this. With pine i have had the most consistent luck with General Finishes oil based gel stain. You don’t need to use a conditioner with it, and 2 coats will self even everything out.

- SMP

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SuzyQ222

33 posts in 39 days


#12 posted 02-22-2020 01:37 AM

Thanks for your suggestions. I currently have the danish oil, so I was hoping someone could answer my questions if they have had experience applying it on pine wood.

If all of your test boards are coming out different i have some questions for you:

1. Are you sand ing everything with the same grit sandpaper and what grit?

2. Do you follow the same sanding schedule with all pieces? (ie 80, then 120, then 150 etc)

3. Are you using a blotch control/conditioner and which one? And are you shaking it well?
Thanks for your suggestions, but I was hoping someone could answer my questions about the danish oil since that is what I have at the moment.

Besides those questions I will say this. With pine i have had the most consistent luck with General Finishes oil based gel stain. You don’t need to use a conditioner with it, and 2 coats will self even everything out.

- SMP

- SuzyQ222

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OSU55

2596 posts in 2661 days


#13 posted 02-22-2020 12:57 PM

Been a while since Ive used danish oil. As I remember the colored stuff has pigment added not dye, so color differences are due more to the surface texture of the wood vs absorption, so careful sanding is required. An option is to add some dye to the poly wipe on. Here is an example. Blotch control,Oils vs poly, and some reference books here.

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bondogaposis

5679 posts in 3022 days


#14 posted 02-22-2020 02:56 PM

Pine is super prone to blotching. If it was mine I’d just use natural danish oil and let it go at that.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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