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Planing short pieces

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Forum topic by dbw posted 02-16-2020 07:48 PM 763 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dbw

377 posts in 2308 days


02-16-2020 07:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planing short stock planer bed

I need to plane pieces of stock which are less than 5” long. I’m planning on hot glueing them to my planer sled, which has a cleat at the end. Is this a good idea or a recipe for disaster?

-- measure 3 times, cut once


31 replies so far

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

547 posts in 2320 days


#1 posted 02-16-2020 08:50 PM

5 inch piece but a couple of inches on each end for snipe, so looking for a one inch board? Too wide to use the jointer?

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dbw

377 posts in 2308 days


#2 posted 02-16-2020 08:59 PM

The pieces are 4.5” X 3”. These are cast-offs from another project. I’m resawing them from 6/4 because I need +/- 1 1/16” thick.

-- measure 3 times, cut once

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1361 posts in 3464 days


#3 posted 02-16-2020 09:17 PM

Butt the pieces end to end on the sled.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7809 posts in 2870 days


#4 posted 02-16-2020 09:29 PM

Which planer do you have? Not all are the same… My Makita can do as short as 5.5” (with no snipe!), but my Ridgid states a 12” minimum. Anyway, you should be fine hot gluing or double sided taping them end to end on a backer board and running it through.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View dbw's profile

dbw

377 posts in 2308 days


#5 posted 02-16-2020 10:34 PM

DeWalt 735. Which Makita do you have?

-- measure 3 times, cut once

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7809 posts in 2870 days


#6 posted 02-16-2020 10:43 PM

DeWalt 735. Which Makita do you have?
- dbw

2030 planer/jointer combo

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View realcowtown_eric's profile

realcowtown_eric

631 posts in 2608 days


#7 posted 02-17-2020 01:07 AM

just mount your jointer plane in the shop-vice upside down and do it manually.

That trick has been in tips and technique books for a half century

Eric

-- Real_cowtown_eric

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

24965 posts in 3354 days


#8 posted 02-17-2020 01:31 AM

Hmmm…

This one is 4-1/2” long….

Which is the ends on this box….6” combo square is for scale….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View cmacnaughton's profile

cmacnaughton

177 posts in 315 days


#9 posted 02-17-2020 01:37 AM


This one is 4-1/2” long….

Which is the ends on this box….6” combo square is for scale….

- bandit571


Yep…nice and quiet, too!

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

21 posts in 56 days


#10 posted 02-17-2020 05:41 AM

I concur with bandit571, a #3 or #4 bench plane will also be quicker than the time it takes to set up a sled.

View Andre's profile

Andre

3194 posts in 2477 days


#11 posted 02-17-2020 07:16 AM

Place sacrificially strips of wood down either side.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

6080 posts in 3484 days


#12 posted 02-17-2020 07:46 AM

A melamine sled can be used over and over again, so it’s a useful addition to the shop.
My 735 can probably handle pieces that short, but I use a Shelix head.

A flat, continuous surface is a must. It can be a sled that gets pulled through your planer, or a stationary piece of melamine with cleats underneath.

If you want to temporarily attach short lengths of wood to a planer sled, try double sided carpet tape.

You just have to ask yourself if the potential yield is worth the risk to your equipment and livelihood.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

3790 posts in 1492 days


#13 posted 02-17-2020 09:49 AM

Personally it might be more economical to turf the 5” scraps… after all they are scraps that potentially generate opportunities for an accident and replace by newly cut, longer, manageable pieces without the risk.
You’ll probably find you’ll save a fortune by not piss farting about trying to formulate a futile workaround.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Robert's profile

Robert

3655 posts in 2152 days


#14 posted 02-17-2020 02:43 PM

Depends on how far apart the roller and cutter head as well as the type of cutter (knives vs helical).

I can tell you for a fact, ds tape, hot melt glue, sled or not, when you hear the explosion its too late to think about whether you’ve got more lumber :-D

Best to thickness before you cut to length ;-).

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

6341 posts in 2392 days


#15 posted 02-17-2020 03:09 PM

Just run them through one at a time, what’s the worst that could happen?

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

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