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attaching back to scroll saw pattern

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Forum topic by Alexander posted 02-15-2020 04:41 AM 402 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Alexander

198 posts in 3910 days


02-15-2020 04:41 AM

How to attach a piece of , say dark wood, to the back of a light wood that you have scrolled your pattern to. I thought of gluing but don’t know how to keep the glue out of my pattern.

-- John at Sugarloft Mountain........Don't argue with an idiot; people watching may not be able to tell the difference.


10 replies so far

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MrUnix

8141 posts in 2998 days


#1 posted 02-15-2020 04:50 AM

Kind of hard to determine what you are asking, but it sounds like you should just apply the glue to the back of the light wood. Can you explain a little more about what exactly you are trying to do?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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therealSteveN

5901 posts in 1373 days


#2 posted 02-15-2020 05:19 AM

If after cutting “big IF” it’s all staying together I have seen some 3M spray adhesive used. If it needs to come apart later. I’d think some smallish tabs of double sided tape, but you have to be careful of placement near small, easily broken/torn parts/

-- Think safe, be safe

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Alexander

198 posts in 3910 days


#3 posted 02-15-2020 06:08 AM

Brad, Gluing the back piece o wood to the front piece is a thought but I can see glue squeezing out and how would I be able to clean it up? Also you don’t want to look through the front piece to the back piece and see glue.
John

-- John at Sugarloft Mountain........Don't argue with an idiot; people watching may not be able to tell the difference.

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John Smith

2499 posts in 961 days


#4 posted 02-15-2020 01:29 PM

for small pieces, I use clear epoxy and toothpicks to apply it to the
center of the backs – to “help minimize” squeeze out.
to get where you want to be: you should practice with like materials.
same size, same type, etc. until you get good at it.
and learn good gluing habits. if you are messy in the application, you will
have a messy outcome – simple as that.
there are DOZENS of good adhesives on the market that work well with
different projects. you have to find what works best within your skill level.

I am a visual person: (as many of us are) I get a better feel of issues with photos.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5623 posts in 2186 days


#5 posted 02-15-2020 03:19 PM

I think that what I would do is put a thin layer of glue on the back of the scrolled piece and then wipe most of the glue off so that there is not enough to squeeze out. You might want to apply, wipe, apply again and wipe again to let the wood sort of absorb the first glue application a little to make sure that there is still enough glue to hold it down. You will need to put something relatively heavy on it to clamp it down so that you get uniform pressure and no warping caused by the moisture in the glue if it is very thin. If there is a solid/unscrolled edge around it, leave a little more glue there and clamp it down with cauls, making sure that there is less glue towards the inside to avoid squeeze out.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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PaulDoug

2391 posts in 2502 days


#6 posted 02-15-2020 03:42 PM

Keep in mind, I do scroll saw portrait, pictures and such. I am not gluing things that will be under stress.

I do it one of two ways. And I do it often, I use a glue like Titebond “Quick and Thick” or Weldbond All Purpose glue, there are others also. The Titebond is what I currently have. I put dabs of it on the back of the front piece, where ever there is enough area to put dabs, lay the front piece on the backer, and weight it for about a minute. Flip the glued pieces over and look for any squeeze out I can see, remove it with an X-acto knife or any tool that will fit in the area. Just scrape it out carefully. These glues dry clear so what you can’t get probably will not show.

The second way, I lay the front piece face down, give the back of the front piece a spray of spray adhesive point straight down and attach it to the backer. So far I have not had one separate on me. If it is a picture like piece, it is not under pressure, so you don’t need gluing like you would in a joint of gluing boards together…

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

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tomsteve

1044 posts in 2018 days


#7 posted 02-15-2020 08:05 PM


How to attach a piece of , say dark wood, to the back of a light wood that you have scrolled your pattern to. I thought of gluing but don t know how to keep the glue out of my pattern.

- Alexander

reads like youre wanting to put a backer on a scrolled piece.
if so, the way ive done it for hundreds of projects over 14 years with no problem is using medium CA glue. i lay the piece i scrolled backside up on a flat surface(table saw), run ca around the perimeter then a spot here and there making sure to put some on delicate pieces. then lay the backer on it and weight it down. couple minutes later its done. if theres squeeze out,which rarely happens any more, the CA dries clear and isnt noticable.

View Alexander's profile

Alexander

198 posts in 3910 days


#8 posted 02-16-2020 04:49 AM

The CA glue looks like a good way to glue the pieces together. I use the CA glue with some of my wood turning so I am used to that glue. Thank you all for the helpful suggestions.

Another problem: my 1/4” purple heart piece has a slight bow to it so it will not lay flat on the wall. What is a way I can flatten the piece out?

-- John at Sugarloft Mountain........Don't argue with an idiot; people watching may not be able to tell the difference.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5623 posts in 2186 days


#9 posted 02-16-2020 05:05 AM

Is it bowed (curved along the grain) or cupped (curved across the grain)?

On a cupped board, sometimes you can dampen the cupped side with water and it will flatten out again. It may help to also apply a little bit of heat to the opposite side.

If there is bow along its length, you may be able to bend it while applying some heat with a heat gun. Bend it against a pipe gradually working along the length. It helps to keep the pipe hot as you work. Be careful to work slowly so that you don’t break the thin board.

YMMV

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View wichman3's profile

wichman3

97 posts in 1420 days


#10 posted 02-18-2020 04:32 AM

I have a pattern for a fancy Welcome sign that I want to put on the outside of my house, so I wanted a waterproof glue.
My Technique was to use a mini foam roller and polyurethane glue I used a small tray and put a small amount of glue on the roller, working it in the small tray (a cheap aluminum cooking tray) until there was an even amount on the roller. I then used the roller to apply glue to the back of the cutout fretwork ( I left the pattern on the front and used a slightly oversized piece for the back) placed the fretwork on the backer, set it on a workbench with a piece of plywood that completely covered the fretwork, set weights on it (books) and let it sit for 24 hrs. Worked like a charm, no squeeze out at all. I then cut the outside of the pattern (both the top and the backer). So far so good.
Just and idea to think about.

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