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Interior Acrylic Latex thru 4 stage HVLP HELP!

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Forum topic by irish620 posted 02-12-2020 06:29 AM 625 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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irish620

56 posts in 2949 days


02-12-2020 06:29 AM

Recently replaced 10 interior doors inside my house and now I need to paint them. My current setup is a 4 stage CAPSPRAY CS9100. I have thinned latex 10-20% in the past with varied results, none of which blew me away. I’ve never been able to fully atomize the paint to the point where it lays on completely smooth. I know HVLPs aren’t really meant to spray latex that well given the thick viscosity but I don’t really want to buy an airless sprayer.

I have a viscosity cup which has helped me a little bit and my largest tip/needle is a #4. I was thinking of buying a #5 or #6 tip but they aren’t cheap ($90) and I’m not sure if I’m traveling down a dead end road. I will be shooting Sherwin Williams Superpaint and it’s pretty thick material!

Tip Chart Info:

#4 Projector Set 1.8mm/.070” 0276228 Medium Viscosity Materials, Same products as #3 plus Multi-latex, Multi-color

#5 Projector Set 2.2mm/.086 0276229 High Viscosity Materials, Same as #4 needle plus heavier bodied latexes, adhesives, gels

#6 Projector Set 2.4mm/.094” 0276245 High Viscosity Materials, Same as #5 but heavier bodied latexes, gels and adhesives

Anyone have advice to get my CAPSPRAY shooting latex properly or recommendations for an airless or maybe I should get a bigger compressor and the right gun? I’m swimming in all the options.

SW Superpaint PDS info:

Spray—Airless
Pressure 2000 p.s.i.
Tip .017-.021 inch

Thanks for your Help!

TJ


22 replies so far

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

158 posts in 238 days


#1 posted 02-12-2020 07:09 AM

Flotrol. Add it to the paint and it helps it level out.

I’ve used a couple of different setups to spray latex. The cheap Wagner HVLP systems, and similar brands, you can buy at the box stores works quite well for latex, actually.

My Earlex system works well, too, for smaller items. I wouldn’t want to paint a bunch of doors with it, though. I recently redid a set of chairs with latex. I needed a good opaque finish and I got the exact color I needed mixed up. Then I added Flotrol and some polyurethane. I’ve done a . couple of coats of clear poly on top and it looks really nice.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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Robert

3641 posts in 2121 days


#2 posted 02-12-2020 03:47 PM

Sorry I have no knowledge of this equipment. Have you tried calling the manufacturer?

In my (limited) experience I’ve had pretty good luck spraying SW Pro Classic through both types of sprayers hvlp and turbine. Seems like it only needs about 20% thinning. But like you, other than oil based it seems I get inconsistent results, probably depending on humidity.

That said, the best results I get by far is using Target Coatings pigmented lacquer. I spray it though a Earlex Sprayport 3 stage using a 1.4mm tip.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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irish620

56 posts in 2949 days


#3 posted 02-12-2020 06:04 PM

Thanks guys. Yes, I have thinned it down pass the 20% mark with inconsistent results. I know I picked a difficult material to spray, given my setup, and I am kicking myself, but I already paid for a 5 gal bucket, so I’ll be damned if I’m gonna waste it.

I think the #4 spray tip just isn’t large enough to let the heavy latex pass thru. So, do I pay $90 for a #5 tip and find out it doesn’t work and then pay another $90 for a #6 tip ? Or invest in an airless?

I think pigmented lacquers are the way to go in the future, so I’m just trying to get this job done without investing to much into Latex.

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

852 posts in 188 days


#4 posted 02-12-2020 07:49 PM

You could do a test, thinned 20% with water, then add floetrol. IMO, floetrol isnt really a thinner. Water affects the integrity of paint. Floetrol doesnt, it improves flow and leveling, maintains consistency, gives longer wet-edge time, and doesnt affect the colour.

I think the ratio for floetrol is 1 to 10, so 1liter to 10liters.

There is a product called ThinX, like floetrol, but with the consistency of water.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: If you tell the truth, you dont have to remember anything (S. Clemens) Edit: Now where is that darn pencil/ tape measure!

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Kelly

2696 posts in 3585 days


#5 posted 02-13-2020 05:04 AM

I have the same Capsprayer and a SprayTec airless. I used the former to spray my cabinets with just water for thinner. The latter, I’ve used to spray hundreds of gallons of latex. Even with a fine tip, I would not expect the airless to give me any better final finish than I got with the turbine.

Try the Flotrol, as suggested, along with a few tablespoons of “thinner” (water) and see what you think.

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Kelly

2696 posts in 3585 days


#6 posted 02-13-2020 05:05 AM

I have the same Capsprayer and a SprayTec airless. I used the former to spray my cabinets with just water for thinner. The latter, I’ve used to spray hundreds of gallons of latex. Even with a fine tip, I would not expect the airless to give me any better final finish than I got with the turbine.

Try the Flotrol, as suggested, along with a few tablespoons of “thinner” (water) and see what you think. The water has always went well with my four stage. The Flotrol should offer a bit more leveling.

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kiteboarder

3 posts in 962 days


#7 posted 02-13-2020 05:57 AM

You need a much bigger tip. I use the biggest tip I could find which was a $30 hvlp gun with a 3mm tip on amazon shipped from china. Thin the paint down accordingly with water or Flotrol or both. Flotrol is kinda expensive given how much I needed so water it is. Flotrol is a little better but not worth the money from what I could tell. Of course this was all flat work. I wouldn’t try vertical surfaces with the paint being so thin. It would be a runny mess. Not available anymore but maybe on ebay or alliexpress.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07C3SKTL7/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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Sark

244 posts in 1001 days


#8 posted 02-13-2020 06:05 AM

In my opinion there are a lot better finishes for interior doors than latex paint. So my first recommendation would be to get a decent water-based acrylic paint (say General Finishes), primer and finish coat. That being said, I’ve sprayed a fair amount of latex through my HVLP system, and all I needed to do was thin the paint enough so that it flowed like the thinner cabinet-grade spray finishes.

From what I’ve read, there’s a limit to how much you can thin a latex paint before it loses some essential property (binding ability?) but I haven’t found a practical limit. I remember spraying latex thinned almost 50%. Sure that’s not ideal, but it went on smooth. Don’t know what weaknesses were being overlooked in the process.

All the big paint stores carry cabinet-grade acrylic paints (but not HD) so got get a quart from Sherwin Williams or Vista and try that first. You’ll also need a qt of primer. And once the door is primed you need some light sanding before the color coat.

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Kelly

2696 posts in 3585 days


#9 posted 02-13-2020 05:25 PM

I should have mentioned a few details with my [double] post:

1) I have never had to thin with more than a couple teaspoons of water in my HVLP quart cup.

2) If memory serves, applying latex to cabinets, and the horrendous over-spray issue aside, I used about a .013 tip, when spraying with the airless.

https://www.titantool.com

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Kelly

2696 posts in 3585 days


#10 posted 02-13-2020 05:30 PM

For the cabinet interior surfaces on which items rested, I used oil base, to avoid the usual problem of items sticking, even years later.

There are specialty latex finishes that are said to solve this problem, but why? The oil based paint is not porous like latex, and is much cheaper.

When painting commercially, we, often, resorted to oil based paint for doors, to avoid the problem of the paint sticking to other surfaces, even after it hardened.

Of course, the down side of oil is, the time it takes the oil to harden, compared to latex. However, since latex seems to never harden in certain applications (other than the specialty paints) ......

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

852 posts in 188 days


#11 posted 02-13-2020 06:14 PM

I agree 100% with Kelly. Oil paint rules. The only thing I dont like so much with white oil paint is that it yellows over time. But then, the yellowing is a good indicator that a new coat is in order.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: If you tell the truth, you dont have to remember anything (S. Clemens) Edit: Now where is that darn pencil/ tape measure!

View irish620's profile

irish620

56 posts in 2949 days


#12 posted 02-14-2020 12:08 AM

I appreciate everyone’s input. In the future I certainly have a whole host of material options other than latex. I usually stain/clear coat my projects, not a big fan of paint in general, thus my limited knowledge of how to solve this issue.

Do you think I should just stick with my old trusty 4-stage Capspray HVLP and rule out latex in the future?
Then I guess buying an airless is unnecessary. The way i look at it now is that buying $90 #6 tip (assuming that works) or $??? amount of new material to cover 10 doors, might be cheaper than getting a decent airless paint sprayer that can handle this vescosity. Doesn’t make sense to invest in latex equipment if it’s a terrible product.

Like I said earlier, I just want to use the 5 gal of acrylic paint on the doors and call it a day with latex.
Fine pickle I have gotten myself into!

Oh, ya Kiteboarder, I guess I could buy a cheap guy off the internet with the right size just to shoot latex. Will any HVLP guy work with my Capspray 9100 turbine? Hose connection? Does my 4 stage have the balls to push this heavy latex to begin with? I have the Maxum II gun right now.

View kiteboarder's profile

kiteboarder

3 posts in 962 days


#13 posted 02-14-2020 03:28 AM



I appreciate everyone s input. In the future I certainly have a whole host of material options other than latex. I usually stain/clear coat my projects, not a big fan of paint in general, thus my limited knowledge of how to solve this issue.

Do you think I should just stick with my old trusty 4-stage Capspray HVLP and rule out latex in the future?
Then I guess buying an airless is unnecessary. The way i look at it now is that buying $90 #6 tip (assuming that works) or $??? amount of new material to cover 10 doors, might be cheaper than getting a decent airless paint sprayer that can handle this vescosity. Doesn t make sense to invest in latex equipment if it s a terrible product.

Like I said earlier, I just want to use the 5 gal of acrylic paint on the doors and call it a day with latex.
Fine pickle I have gotten myself into!

Oh, ya Kiteboarder, I guess I could buy a cheap guy off the internet with the right size just to shoot latex. Will any HVLP guy work with my Capspray 9100 turbine? Hose connection? Does my 4 stage have the balls to push this heavy latex to begin with? I have the Maxum II gun right now.

- irish620

The one I linked was the only one I could find that had a 3mm tip. I wish there was a 4mm but I never found anything bigger than 3mm. I use an air compressor and the sweet spot was around 45-50psi with 15-20%ish thinning. It’s kinda high but I’m spraying latex that doesn’t want to spray. I don’t have a turbine so I have no idea if it will work or not.

I have an airless sprayer as well but no way am I going to pull that out unless I’m painting a whole house or many rooms at a time. One room? no way. Just way too much hassle with setup and cleaning not to mention huge waste of paint during cleanup.

I use the little $30 gun on a daily basis so I’m very happy that I can spray latex and be done with cleanup in 5 minutes. I wish it was better built with a bigger cup and top mounted instead of the side mount but hey beggar can’t be choosers. It was all I could find.

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firefighterontheside

20813 posts in 2497 days


#14 posted 02-14-2020 04:16 AM

I gave up spraying latex after my first try. I was advised by Earlex to mix it really well to try and break up the latex “strings” and make them smaller. Now if I “paint” with my hvlp I use acrylic tinted water based lacquer from target coatings.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2696 posts in 3585 days


#15 posted 02-14-2020 05:23 AM

I know, for a fact, the Capsprayer four stage can move latex and atomize it well enough to lay down a nice finish. Hell, I use mine to apply texture in a gun I swappped air inputs to a HVLP fitting on. That’s some pretty heavy stuff, obviously.

If having problems with latex, it’s got to be something as simple as a tip change. As I said, I have the EXACT same Capsprayer and it has never had a problem laying down latex on cabinets.

My Capsprayer does every bit as good a job as my Accusprayer (a dedicated conversion system, with a 2-1/2 gallon pressure pot.)

The conversion HVLP’s are a whole different ballgame than a true HVLP turbine. The air hose is several times as large. My Capsprayer puts out somewhere in the area of 80 CFM at around 8-9 PSI.

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