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Need advice on making this pattern into a template

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Forum topic by RickDel posted 02-07-2020 07:05 PM 638 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RickDel

24 posts in 466 days


02-07-2020 07:05 PM

Hello, I’m new to woodworking and I want to made some shelf corbels. I drew a pattern but looking for advice on making them.

Here’s the pattern:

My plan is, on a thin piece of hardboard, to cut the outside with a bandsaw and the inside with a scroll saw. If that’s correct, he’s my two questions:

1. What do I use to get smooth lines? Can I use a spindle sander on the outside (red arrows) and a 1” belt sander on the straight edges (blue arrows).

2. What about the inside? I already tried a practice run with my scroll saw and it was TERRIBLE!! So, if I can get straight edges fairly close to the lines, what should I use to finish the inside lines? I was thinking files and sanding sticks.

I may be completely off with my plan, so any advice is greatly appreciated. – Rick


17 replies so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

12733 posts in 1810 days


#1 posted 02-07-2020 07:32 PM

How do you plan to use the pattern? Will you be using it with a pattern bit in a router? If so, you may want to use something other than hardboard. It will compress after some use and your hard edges will become softer.

As far as making the pattern, I would do it exactly as you described. Just cut wide of your lines so you can sand to the final size. I would probably use some hard wood with sandpaper wrapped like a file to finish sanding the straight lines. Again though, due to the physical composition of hard board, it may be difficult to get a crisp,straight edge with abrasives.

Best of luck!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5679 posts in 3022 days


#2 posted 02-07-2020 07:43 PM

I would make that in two pieces and you could eliminate the scroll saw altogether. Then I would cut close to the line with the bandsaw and finish with a pattern bit on the router. A pattern bit won’t get into all of the detail, you’ll still have to finish up with hand tools.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

6888 posts in 3865 days


#3 posted 02-07-2020 07:44 PM

^ this…..I would prolly do like Ken suggested, and it sounds like you answered your own questions….

Sound advice from Bondo also….!

-- " There's a better way.....find it"...... Thomas Edison.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2231 posts in 834 days


#4 posted 02-07-2020 07:44 PM

on a similar project, but only one item, I got a wide jigsaw blade
and ground off the teeth and glued sandpaper to the blade.
you would be surprised at how it works on soft wood (redwood is what I used).
on hard wood, you may have to change the sandpaper often.
on the inside circular parts, I would use a forstner bit and tweak the design
so it all fits the tools that you will be using.
are these going to be painted or clear coated ? what is the thickness of the wood ?
(if they are going to be painted, Bondo can cover up a lot of rough tooling marks).

.

-- I am a painter: that's what I do, I like to paint things. --

View RickDel's profile

RickDel

24 posts in 466 days


#5 posted 02-07-2020 07:44 PM

Thanks HokieKen!

I might try a couple different materials for the template. And yes, I want to use my router. I was thinking of using my 1/2” table router for the outside and my 1/4” handheld for the inside. I have a few bits to try but just ordered a 1/4” Up-Cut Flush Trim Solid Carbide Spiral Router Bit I’m hoping will work for the inside, tight spots.

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RickDel

24 posts in 466 days


#6 posted 02-07-2020 08:40 PM

Bondo Gaposis, AHHH, great idea! I may do it in two parts. Thanks!

John, thanks for the idea. I’m planning to do a three part corbel. Three 3/4” pieces of soft wood glued together, with the center piece slightly offset. Then, I plan to paint. Thanks.

View bmerrill's profile

bmerrill

88 posts in 744 days


#7 posted 02-07-2020 08:41 PM

Lot of areas where a router bit is useless.
Band saw for the outside work, scroll saw for the inside work and sand.
Were you using a handheld jig saw to cut the inside?
The inside work is a perfect project for a scroll saw.
https://www.woodcraft.com/products/pegas-21-scroll-saw-machine-pegas?gclid=Cj0KCQiAsvTxBRDkARIsAH4Wje3z763qzMgnPAshmFQtslDyGDdKL6hEP5Bt5NepEijjANtGMGLgaAt-kEALwwcB

-- "Do. Or do not. There is no try". Yoda

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

3790 posts in 1492 days


#8 posted 02-08-2020 09:50 AM

R’D’, are you looking to do it on the cheap or accuracy/repeatability? Seems like you already have the pattern digitally. Get a quote from a local laser cutting service out of MDF that you could then use as a routing template.

If you realistically costed the time it may take you to do all manually, you might be surprised at the cost effectiveness of a laser service… it’s often the design that kills such services.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View RickDel's profile

RickDel

24 posts in 466 days


#9 posted 02-08-2020 09:37 PM

LittleBlackDuck, I thought about that and even looked online to see if I could find a service, but I don’t know were to even begin to find something like that locally. I live in a rural area of Delaware.

BTW, I looked very hard online to find that design. Once I found something I liked I tried to print and trace, but the online pic was taken at an angle so it took me some time squaring and free handing to get it to look right.

Thanks for your suggestion.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

3790 posts in 1492 days


#10 posted 02-08-2020 10:22 PM


LittleBlackDuck, I thought about that and even looked online to see if I could find a service, but I don t know were to even begin to find something like that locally. I live in a rural area of Delaware.
- RickDel
RD, I live in the backwaters as well. I do have a laser, however, I did a Google on laser cutting service ”my region” and got 15 hits (most many Ks away)... don’t forget CNC do as good a job… Alternatively check out some of the “local” schools for CNC. Lastly if you ordered in 3mm MDF (could upgrade yourself to 6mm) shipping may not be extravagant. Any prelim work now may be again useful in the future so it may not be a waste.
They won’t give a price on-line but it doesn’t hurt to get a quote.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2231 posts in 834 days


#11 posted 02-08-2020 10:38 PM

Rick – is the graph squared to 1” – - – approximately 7×10” finished ?

Laser – CNC . . . . . doesn’t anyone make templates out of 1/4” plexiglass BY HAND anymore ??

.

.

-- I am a painter: that's what I do, I like to paint things. --

View _JR's profile

_JR

8 posts in 344 days


#12 posted 02-08-2020 10:58 PM

I agree with the co2 laser cut templates. From there I would use a 1/8” spiral router bit with a bearing guide and then finish off the tight areas with the scroll saw. This should limit the amount of interior sanding needed.

View bc4393's profile

bc4393

88 posts in 1814 days


#13 posted 02-09-2020 05:03 AM

I would duplicate your drawing and round out all the corners to whatever size router bit you’ll be using. Create however many you want to make using your router and pattern. Then 2 way tape multiples together and attach your original drawing on top and do the fine work with your band saw, scroll saw and finish them up by hand using the appropriate tools while still attached together. You’ll have the maximum number possible which are exactly the same without resorting to a third party to laser or cnc them.

View RickDel's profile

RickDel

24 posts in 466 days


#14 posted 02-09-2020 04:27 PM

LittleBlackDuck, thanks again…. I think I’m going to try to tackle this all by hand, but I’m definitely going to look into that for future projects.


I agree with the co2 laser cut templates. From there I would use a 1/8” spiral router bit with a bearing guide and then finish off the tight areas with the scroll saw. This should limit the amount of interior sanding needed.

- _JR


This was exactly my plan! I just wanted to see what you guys with experience suggested first. Thanks!

Rick – is the graph squared to 1” – – – approximately 7×10” finished ?

John, Yes sir, 1” squares but that pic was just an approximate. I’m still figuring out the exact dimensions. I want to put another piece with a routed edge around the outside, so I still need to figure out the dimensions subtracting that piece. I’m thinking an 8” shelf, so this will probably be a 6” corbel with another 1” of routed board (for a total of 7” corbel), which I think will leave me about an inch between my corbel and the edge of the shelf. Although, the picture looks like less space between the shelf edge and corbel, so still figuring it out.

Here’s a pic of my of what I want to do:

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4785 posts in 2058 days


#15 posted 02-09-2020 04:54 PM

Any of those inside corners that are not round can obviously not be cut with a round router bit so will require some manual work with a saw or chisel. If you modify the pattern so that all of the inside corners are round, you may be able to eliminate the manual clean up after using the router.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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