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Forum topic by Oldschoolguy posted 02-02-2020 03:29 PM 742 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Oldschoolguy

108 posts in 691 days


02-02-2020 03:29 PM

Morning y’all, I’m due to have a 14’ band saw delivered soon. As the title suggest, this will be my first experience with one. Included with the saw will be an 1/8” blade. I’m not sure at this point, how much resawing I’ll be doing. But before I do anything, I want to install a new, wider blade. The manual is pretty thorough with pictures and full directions, therefore changing the blade should be easy to accomplish. Also, there are several Youtube videos to help with the change over. However, I would like to hear about suggested blade width, TPI, manufactures, steel or carbide. As far as manufactures, what do you know about Timber Wolf and their thin kerf blades? In addition, how many hours should I expect to get from a blade? Also, what are the best blade guides to use? Please includes all your knowledge, tips, recommendations, comments and all other pertinent info. Your knowledge and help is always appreciated. Thanks y’all.


19 replies so far

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4878 posts in 2843 days


#1 posted 02-02-2020 03:54 PM

I suggest you buy a 3/8” or 1 /2” blade and get some experience . Also watch the Snodgrass Bandsaw video.

You are asking for a entire book of information. It will be much more effective to gain some actual experience first exchanging a blade and getting it set up properly and then getting advice. Changing a blade is a bit more difficult than a manual shows.

View dbw's profile

dbw

439 posts in 2491 days


#2 posted 02-02-2020 05:01 PM



I suggest you buy a 3/8” or 1 /2” blade and get some experience . Also watch the Snodgrass Bandsaw video.

You are asking for a entire book of information. It will be mh more effective to gain some actual experience first exchanging a blade and getting it set up properly and then getting advice. Changing a blade is a bit more difficult than a manual shows.

- Redoak49


+1 on this. Changing a BS blade is more time consuming than some would lead you to believe. One thing I will tell you is most wood workers over-tension their BS blade. This is a direct quote from my go-to expert – a guy who works at my local Woodcraft and has been doing woodworking for at least 30 years. His way of tensioning is to make it tight and then back the tension off until the blade starts “slapping” the inside of the blade channel on the left side. At this point you turn the tension wheel until the slapping just stops. Done. I do this every time and it works very well.

In terms of blade selection for resawing I use a Timber Wolf 3/4” 3/2 TPI silicon steel blade. You can (probably) use a 1/2” for resawing. You may want to call the customer service people at Timber Wolf. They are excellent at what they do and they will help in terms of blade selection.

-- Measure twice, cut once. If it still doesn't fit get a big hammer.

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Rich

5889 posts in 1444 days


#3 posted 02-02-2020 05:18 PM

You’ll definitely want to install a wider blade. Start with a 1/4” blade with a mid-range TPI (teeth per inch), say around eight TPI. Timber Wolf makes such a blade, and they are one of the better choices for quality band saw blades. As you advance through different uses for the saw, you can buy additional blades that are more appropriate for the situation.

You basically have three things to choose when you look at blades; width, TPI and tooth configuration. The first two are self explanatory. The third again divides up into three basic options; standard, hook and variable. Standard blades have a zero tooth hook angle for general purpose cutting. It’ll give you the smoothest cut. A hook blade has a positive hook angle and will clear sawdust better making it more suitable for thicker stock. Variable refers to a variable TPI, usually 2 to 3 or 3 to 4. They are used for resawing and the variable TPI helps prevent harmonics from developing during the cut.

Regarding blade changing, it’ll be confusing at first, but after a few you’ll find that it’s very easy. I’m not sure why some people struggle with it. Basically, you’ll need to adjust the guides, tension and the tracking. There are lots of videos and other resources online to help you along. Just don’t get frustrated—it’s not hard and you’ll get the hang of it.

Regarding carbide, if you get into a lot of resawing hardwoods, it’s a good investment. Otherwise, don’t spend the money.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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LesB

2606 posts in 4297 days


#4 posted 02-02-2020 06:01 PM

Good info in the above responses but no one dealt with the “life” of a blade. I can’t specifically answer that either because so much of it depends on variables of the blades use.
Several things affect the blade from just plain loss of sharpness to the loss of blade tooth set that limits it’s ability to cut curves and one of my bugaboos a kink in the blade from doing something stupid…..like cutting an unstable piece of “fire” wood for lathe turning and having it catch and kink the blade. On the latter, the blade will still cut but leaves a rough edge. Also the occasional sawing or re-sawing of recycled wood and hitting a nail.
Also for some of the skip tooth blades I have been able to touch up the sharpness with my Dremel tool….tedious but it does add some life, especially for use just rough cutting.

Be safe, keep your fingers clear of the blade, use push sticks and make sure the material you are cutting is under control; ie: unstable or round pieces can pitch and roll as the blade starts the cut.

-- Les B, Oregon

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sansoo22

1125 posts in 509 days


#5 posted 02-02-2020 06:52 PM

This is the Snodgrass video I watched when I first got my band saw. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

The bit about aligning the deepest part of the gullet to the center of the wheel had my old band saw humming in no time once I did that. All the blade configuration can be a bit overwhelming when you’re new to band saws. I was given a 3/8” 3 tpi blade and I tried to use that with bad results. I’m still not sure what such a blade is for.

The first blade I bought myself and learned to track and tension was a timber wolf 1/4” 8 tpi just like Rich mentioned. It was a world of difference. Since then I picked up a 3/8” 6 tpi that has become my general purpose blade but thats probably due to being in a new shop and building lots of shop furniture. I also have a 1/2” 2/3 tpi for resaw work but my saw has a really crappy fence so I rarely do that.

My first blade changes were frustrating because i had a hard time with tracking. Just take it slow and make minor adjustments. Like with many tools there will be a “light bulb” moment where you’re like “oh that’s how all these adjustments work” and from then on it should be much easier to do.

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Andybb

2834 posts in 1458 days


#6 posted 02-02-2020 08:46 PM


This is the Snodgrass video I watched when I first got my band saw. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

The bit about aligning the deepest part of the gullet to the center of the wheel had my old band saw humming in no time once I did that.
- sansoo22

That is the only thing I disagree with Snodgrass on and can be confusing. He talks about centering the gullet on the wheels because they are crowned. Not all band saws have crowned wheels. My Laguna 1412 does not, as confirmed by Laguna. That is why Laguna says to center the blade on the tires. My 3/4” Resaw King would hang off the back of the wheel if I did that. No drift with any thickness of blade when it’s in the middle of the tire.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

3417 posts in 2069 days


#7 posted 02-03-2020 01:32 AM

+1

-- Desert_Woodworker

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

1125 posts in 509 days


#8 posted 02-03-2020 01:33 AM

Good point Andy. I never thought about it as I’ve only owned one band saw and the method worked for me. Good lesson that not all recommendations are black and white no matter how much knowledge the expert giving it possess.

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Desert_Woodworker

3417 posts in 2069 days


#9 posted 02-03-2020 01:34 AM

+1


You ll definitely want to install a wider blade. Start with a 1/4” blade with a mid-range TPI (teeth per inch), say around eight TPI. Timber Wolf makes such a blade, and they are one of the better choices for quality band saw blades. As you advance through different uses for the saw, you can buy additional blades that are more appropriate for the situation.

You basically have three things to choose when you look at blades; width, TPI and tooth configuration. The first two are self explanatory. The third again divides up into three basic options; standard, hook and variable. Standard blades have a zero tooth hook angle for general purpose cutting. It ll give you the smoothest cut. A hook blade has a positive hook angle and will clear sawdust better making it more suitable for thicker stock. Variable refers to a variable TPI, usually 2 to 3 or 3 to 4. They are used for resawing and the variable TPI helps prevent harmonics from developing during the cut.

Regarding blade changing, it ll be confusing at first, but after a few you ll find that it s very easy. I m not sure why some people struggle with it. Basically, you ll need to adjust the guides, tension and the tracking. There are lots of videos and other resources online to help you along. Just don t get frustrated—it s not hard and you ll get the hang of it.

Regarding carbide, if you get into a lot of resawing hardwoods, it s a good investment. Otherwise, don t spend the money.

- Rich

+1

-- Desert_Woodworker

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CaptainKlutz

3608 posts in 2349 days


#10 posted 02-03-2020 02:11 AM

When i comes to blade choices, every one has favorites. Have used many brands. One brand I keep coming back to is Timber Wolf.

Also really like one aspect of the web site > The blade selection reference, even if I buy my blades elsewhere:
https://www.timberwolfblades.com/Blade-Selector.php

When I was starting out, and learning about TPI, tooth styles, widths, etc; the Timber wolf selector table easily answered every question, without needing to search all over the WWW. Everything you need to know about recommended blade for any thickness, cut type, or size saw; is listed in ONE page.

The blade selector by cut type is handy:
https://www.timberwolfblades.com/Blade-Selector.php#cut

IMHO – The 3 blade assortment packs are great way to properly equip your shop based on your upcoming project list. YMMV

PS – Just because the list recommends different blades for different cuts, it does not mean it is required to have a large blade assortment. There are general purpose blades, just like combination blade on table saw. Many folks need 2-3 different blades max. But it you want the best cut edge quality in thin stock (more TPI), or less time spent gnawing through 4” thick lumber (less TPI); having the right blade makes it easier and more fun to work wood. :-)

Best luck with your new tool/toy!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View dbw's profile

dbw

439 posts in 2491 days


#11 posted 02-03-2020 01:06 PM

Here is another nugget Howard (Woodcraft) imparted on me: One should have 4-6 teeth in the cut, i.e., if you are cutting 3/4” stock you should use a blade with 8 TPI. 8 TPI will result in 6 teeth in the cut (.75 X 8 = 6). This does not apply to resawing.

-- Measure twice, cut once. If it still doesn't fit get a big hammer.

View Oldschoolguy's profile

Oldschoolguy

108 posts in 691 days


#12 posted 02-05-2020 03:58 PM

Hi guys, just wanted to say thanks to all who replied concerning this topic. Not only this one in particular, but ALL my topics…... past, present and future. Because of my limited intellectual abilities, and the knowledge to think “outside the box”, your tips, links, suggestions and thoughts are invaluable to me. I did view the suggested video and received some valuable information. To me, this forum and the individuals contained herein are a life-saver to me. You will possibly never realize the gratitude that I have for all those who make this forum a success. God bless y’all.

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1133 posts in 758 days


#13 posted 02-05-2020 04:10 PM

It is curious that everyone is quick to offer advice without knowing what brand of bandsaw is involved!

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View Don Newton's profile

Don Newton

732 posts in 4473 days


#14 posted 02-05-2020 04:19 PM

Remember to relieve the tension on your blades when you are not using the saw. I have a small spring clamp that I put on the blade when the tension is removed to remind me to re tension it before use.

-- Don, Pittsburgh

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Oldschoolguy

108 posts in 691 days


#15 posted 02-05-2020 04:30 PM

Hey Phil, good point…...Grizzly 14 inch deluxe.

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