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What did I do wrong with this setup?

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Forum topic by BB1 posted 02-01-2020 06:55 PM 1181 views 1 time favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BB1

1599 posts in 1527 days


02-01-2020 06:55 PM

Finally had some time to get in the shop and wanted to get a start on a little organizer box for in our kitchen. I want to use mitered corners and so set up my saw with the blade at 45. I did a few practice cuts on plywood and then some similar hickory to ensure I had my placement correct. I set up a little stop well before the blade so that I could ensure I was placing all the boards in the same location. When I went to run my first board for the project through, the cut off piece jammed in the throat plate and I still haven’t been able to find it wherever it shot out in the shop (actually chipped the plate). Glad at least I know better than to stand directly behind the blade! As I settle and reflect – a custom plate would be the optimal with zero clearance. Is that the only way to safely do that type of a cut? Guessing the piece may have shifted given the blade pattern and chip on the cut? As always, thanks in advance (LJ are always helpful!!)

Some pictures of my setup and the chip on the plate


34 replies so far

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Phil32

989 posts in 583 days


#1 posted 02-01-2020 07:09 PM

Your setup leaves the cutoff piece dancing on the whirling blade. How about switching sides so the cutoff piece is under the angled blade, so that gravity can help.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Phil32

989 posts in 583 days


#2 posted 02-01-2020 07:09 PM

(duplicate post)

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Woodknack

13140 posts in 3059 days


#3 posted 02-01-2020 07:10 PM

I’ve seen people remove the throat plate altogether. I tried it once but got a lot of tearout So I made a zero clearance insert.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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BurlyBob

7215 posts in 2945 days


#4 posted 02-01-2020 07:12 PM

I was having problems with the blade shifting a tiny bit from the torque of the motor starting. I ended up building a jig that holds the piece at 45 degrees to the blade while I slide it pass the blade set 90 degrees to the table. I did find that a thin kerf blade had some flex and caused a bow in the cut. I eventually went to using a 7 1/4” full kerf blade to keep straight line cut.

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BB1

1599 posts in 1527 days


#5 posted 02-01-2020 07:36 PM

Actually thought of that but talked myself out of it thinking the piece shouldn’t be “trapped under” the blade?


Your setup leaves the cutoff piece dancing on the whirling blade. How about switching sides so the cutoff piece is under the angled blade, so that gravity can help.

- Phil32

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Andybb

2630 posts in 1283 days


#6 posted 02-01-2020 07:47 PM


Your setup leaves the cutoff piece dancing on the whirling blade. How about switching sides so the cutoff piece is under the angled blade, so that gravity can help.

- Phil32


+1 Flip the board over and move the Incra to the right hand slot so the board is on top of the blade. You don’t need the Rockler thin strip for that cut.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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BB1

1599 posts in 1527 days


#7 posted 02-01-2020 07:58 PM

Will give the opposite side a try. The Rockler device was just used to give me a reference point.

Thanks for all the responses. Still in the learning phase…and keeping safety as my #1

Your setup leaves the cutoff piece dancing on the whirling blade. How about switching sides so the cutoff piece is under the angled blade, so that gravity can help.

- Phil32

+1 Flip the board over and move the Incra to the right hand slot so the board is on top of the blade. You don t need the Rockler thin strip for that cut.

- Andybb


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bondogaposis

5683 posts in 3030 days


#8 posted 02-01-2020 08:07 PM

Yes, flip the board over, use the other miter slot, lose the thin rip jig and move the rip fence way out of the way. You may have damaged your blade as well.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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BB1

1599 posts in 1527 days


#9 posted 02-01-2020 08:20 PM

Thanks…hadn’t thought about the blade (figures…is a new one with little use so far).


Yes, flip the board over, use the other miter slot, lose the thin rip jig and move the rip fence way out of the way. You may have damaged your blade as well.

- bondogaposis

I like this idea too – do you have a picture of your jig?


I was having problems with the blade shifting a tiny bit from the torque of the motor starting. I ended up building a jig that holds the piece at 45 degrees to the blade while I slide it pass the blade set 90 degrees to the table. I did find that a thin kerf blade had some flex and caused a bow in the cut. I eventually went to using a 7 1/4” full kerf blade to keep straight line cut.

- BurlyBob


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BB1

1599 posts in 1527 days


#10 posted 02-01-2020 08:38 PM

Just viewed this and thought I would add the link as I found it really helpful on this topic:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7aZCdt8Cs8M

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BB1

1599 posts in 1527 days


#11 posted 02-01-2020 09:17 PM

Tried opposite setup, freshly sharpened blade (will get the other checked out), and happened again. Think I’m done until I can get a zero clearance setup or jig as BurlyBob noted. At least I could find the cutoff this time!

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

669 posts in 1971 days


#12 posted 02-01-2020 09:30 PM

Watched the YouTube video you suggested. It had a lot of good tips.
Try adding a plywood sacrificial fence to your Incra miter gauge.

-- James E McIntyre

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1448 posts in 2631 days


#13 posted 02-01-2020 09:38 PM

The picture you show with the cutoff you found shows that it was the leading edge of the piece that caught on the blade. I think another issue might be that the blade is extended too far out of the table. When the cut is complete at the front edge of the blade the entire cutoff is still even with the blade and the upward turning back of the blade caught the end of the cutoff.Try lowering it until the top of the work piece is just at the gullets. My guess is that your first setup might have even worked with the blade lower.

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Phil32

989 posts in 583 days


#14 posted 02-01-2020 10:38 PM

I think the fact that you’re cutting hickory is also a consideration. The photo shows it to be brittle.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

2366 posts in 2383 days


#15 posted 02-01-2020 10:48 PM

Wouldn’t a backer board attached to you miter gauge that extends past the waste piece help in two ways, reduce or eliminate tearout at the end of your cut and push the the cut off piece until it is completely cut. Or is that even more dangerous?

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

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