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Cracked trunnion support on my Rikon bandsaw

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Forum topic by adamclyde posted 01-31-2020 05:40 AM 963 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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adamclyde

43 posts in 2918 days


01-31-2020 05:40 AM

I have an 18-inch rikon bandsaw (model 10-345). Somehow the trunnion support bracket has a little crack in it, which probably isn’t a huge deal, except that it’s cracked right at the threads for the hex nut that controls the lower thrust bearing.

Which means, I can’t tighten the thrust bearing and so it just hangs there useless.

I am going to order a new part from Rikon I think, but in the meantime, I’m wondering if anyone has a clever way to temporarily fix it? Maybe if I were metal savvy I could weld it back and then re-tap it. but… I’m not.

Any thoughts? I’ve attached a few photos. Hoping they can illustrate.


8 replies so far

View CaptainKlutz's profile (online now)

CaptainKlutz

4127 posts in 2499 days


#1 posted 01-31-2020 06:23 AM

1) Call Rikon, make a warranty claim, even if out of warranty. That looks like a design weakness to me. If they know it’s a problem, there might even be an improved part that solves the issue.

If they refuse to help, use the big stick: Tell them your repair story is being tracked by the LJ wood working community. No one likes bad press among our small community. :-)

2) Find someone who can braze or weld it.
Cast iron can be repaired via brazing. Brazing only weakness is the soft metal repair won’t take as much stress as hard metal weld?
Can mig weld cast iron with stainless wire, or stick weld with nickel alloy stick. There is a lot of debate on WWW about welding cast iron and massive amount of skill it takes to make at perfect and durable repair. I randomly weld something twice a year, and had luck mig welding cast iron both times I tried. One was bolt thread area fix similar to your issue. Trick is to pre-heat and give long slow post cool.

3) Use Permatex Steel Weld Epoxy or JB Weld:
The area of break appears to be under a lot of stress, not sure how long this would hold. But
Permatex as steel filler, JB Weld uses aluminum, and can be drilled/tapped just like steel. Have used it salvage small gas engine, or carburetor casting many times.
If you wax the thrust bearing, then coat it with silicone spray lube; could use it as insert plug to add some material on that side. Just keep the silicone away from the any where you want epoxy to stick.
On really small cracks, might have open then up with grinding wheel to get epoxy into the joint.

Best Luck!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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adamclyde

43 posts in 2918 days


#2 posted 01-31-2020 03:30 PM


Use Permatex Steel Weld Epoxy or JB Weld:
The area of break appears to be under a lot of stress, not sure how long this would hold. But
Permatex as steel filler, JB Weld uses aluminum, and can be drilled/tapped just like steel. Have used it salvage small gas engine, or carburetor casting many times.
If you wax the thrust bearing, then coat it with silicone spray lube; could use it as insert plug to add some material on that side. Just keep the silicone away from the any where you want epoxy to stick.
On really small cracks, might have open then up with grinding wheel to get epoxy into the joint.

Best Luck!

- CaptainKlutz


Thank you for all of this. I’ll definitely call Rikon. Hoping it goes well. Also, I’m thinking I will try your Permatex idea first just in case. That seems like the easiest fix. If it doesn’t work, I can resort to option 2 (assuming Rikon doesn’t send a new part).

View MacGavin's profile

MacGavin

1 post in 144 days


#3 posted 10-04-2020 05:40 AM

Adam,

I hope to hear the solution you went with to solve this problem. I have the same model Rikon and also cracked the trunnion support while dialing in the lower thrust bearing for a new blade. It seems this is a common problem for this model, and a very upsetting one. Did you end up arriving at a solution?

Will

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1373 posts in 2654 days


#4 posted 10-04-2020 12:19 PM

Adding to what “Captian” said, I doubt brazing would be strong enough unless it was used to add substantial additional plates to the boss. I might add a bit of 1/8 plate to each side but heating that small area on a big casting can also be difficult without warping it.

JB Weld is not going to hold up in that instance. It sure does look like an oversight in design. If I could not get an upgraded replacement, I would talk to a professional welder and see if they could not repair and reinforce the boss. It probably needs a high end welding shop, not the guy at the corner with a couple of MIGs and a torch.

Wondering if you could machine a block that fits between the flanges to put the lock bolt in.

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

1053 posts in 3357 days


#5 posted 10-04-2020 12:51 PM

I hope you the best but this doesn’t look good to me in this article. larry

https://www.finewoodworking.com/forum/rikon-bandsaw-model-10-345-big-problems

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View northwoodsman's profile

northwoodsman

509 posts in 4751 days


#6 posted 10-04-2020 01:38 PM

I purchased an early 90’s Ridgid bandsaw from my wifes grandfather when he moved into a nursing home. Many of the parts connected to the trunnion appeared to be cast aluminum. One by one each of them literally crumbled each time I tried to make adjustments. I ended up putting a riser kit on it, replacing the guides with the Carter system, and replacing all the cast aluminum parts with new ones and it was a solid saw. I just couldn’t believe that all the parts kept breaking and cracking. I wouldn’t expect steel or aluminum to weaken with age.

-- NorthWoodsMan

View PJveetwin's profile

PJveetwin

9 posts in 148 days


#7 posted 10-04-2020 02:07 PM

I have personally brazed a lot of cast iron with most being a permanent repair. Surely you know someone with a torch? worth a shot

-- Jimmy from the upper Mojave Desert in beautiful Kalifornia

View adamclyde's profile

adamclyde

43 posts in 2918 days


#8 posted 10-06-2020 01:48 AM



Adam,

I hope to hear the solution you went with to solve this problem. I have the same model Rikon and also cracked the trunnion support while dialing in the lower thrust bearing for a new blade. It seems this is a common problem for this model, and a very upsetting one. Did you end up arriving at a solution?

Will

- MacGavin

I bought JB Weld as others recommended above, and I bought a tap and die set. But I could tell that just as @tvrgeek said, it just wasn’t going to be strong enough so I didn’t even go that route. And @PJveetwin my friends are clearly not skilled enough. :)

So in the end I just called Rikon and bought a new trunnion. It took some time for them to locate the trunnion for my year bandsaw as they don’t carry them stock any longer. But the guy there was awesome and finally found me one. Took a good month or two, but some of that I blame on Covid. That’s done the trick.

(Now if I could only tune the thing so it doesn’t shake like an earthquake… no amount of Alex Snodgrass tuning has helped. Grrrrrrr. )

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