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Forum topic by bilyo posted 01-29-2020 01:29 AM 284 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bilyo

1000 posts in 1745 days


01-29-2020 01:29 AM

I’ve recently had positive experience buying good spray guns for low capacity compressors. I thought my experience might be helpful to others using small compressors who want to do some spraying.

I don’t do a lot of spraying but, when I do, I want to do a good job. Also, my compressor only puts out 6.4 cfm @ 40 psi according to the specs. I know that you can use spray guns that require more cfms than your compressor can put out but, you have to stop and let the compressor catch up from time to time. I wanted to avoid that as much as possible. Also, I did not want to spend hundreds of dollars for something that I would use only a few times per year. As you can imagine, I was pretty frustrated trying to meet those requirements. Until I learned about LVLP (low volume low pressure – as opposed to HVLP).

With a web search, I found some expensive ones and some cheap ones. Not so many in the middle where I wanted to be. One of my other requirements was to have the fluid cup mounted on the side rather than bottom or top. I won’t get into that further unless someone asks. One of the first ones I found was the Sprayit 352 that is sold by Homedepot, California Air Tools, and others. At first, I dismissed it as just too cheap @ $15. However, as my search for one I was willing to pay for was not going well, I decided to go for it. At that price there was not much to lose and Home Depot would probably take it back.

As it turns out, the Sprayit 352 fit my needs perfectly. It’s specs say that it requires only 4 cfm @ 40 psi. This is low enough for many compressors smaller than mine to run. There is a Youtube video showing someone running one of the other Sprayit models on an HVLP turbine. And it sprays beautifully. I used it to spray some water based poly on a top. After 3 coats, the finish was as smooth as glass. This with a 1.5 mm tip and the poly was straight from the can without thinning. Pressure was about 20 psi and overspray was very very low.

After I got the gun, I noticed that it has a big W-71 embossed on the side. Doing a web search for “W-71” if found many sources for the same gun at a variety of prices from $15 and up. This included the Iwata W-71 for over $200. Same gun. So, it appears that the Sprayit and other look-a-likes are Iwata knock-offs. In fact, I found a source for W-71 parts and ordered a 2.0 mm needle, nozzle, cap, and packing. I ordered it from China for $14 with shipping. Got it in 3 weeks and it works perfectly. It sprayed some old latex I had on the shelf beautifully.

The only fault a found was in trying to remove the nozzle for initial cleaning. I had to remove all the soft parts like the needle packing and air valves and heat the nose of the aluminum casting with an electric heat gun while applying wrench pressure on the nozzle. It finally came loose. It must have been “glued” in with some sort of sealant.

I’m new to spraying and not an expert. I have no experience with high quality guns and can only make judgements based on what I see. Fit and finish on this cheap gun seems to be real good. I see aluminum castings that are smooth and well done. Working parts are brass and stainless and are well machined. So, for those with small compressors, I recommend this model, either the Iwata branded one or the knock-off. Iwata also makes a new version, W-101, and there are also knock-offs of it. But, be careful, it is produced in different configurations, some of which require higher cfms.


5 replies so far

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Madmark2

854 posts in 1231 days


#1 posted 01-29-2020 02:35 AM

You shouldn’t need to take it that far apart to clean it. Just run a couple of fluid cups of water or the appropriate solvent for what you’re spraying thru. While spraying put your finger on the tip. The air will backflow into the fluid cup (be sure to keep the cap on) agitating the fluid and back flushing the nozzle.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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bilyo

1000 posts in 1745 days


#2 posted 01-29-2020 04:27 AM

Thanks. The initial cleaning I mentioned was mainly for making sure all of the manufacturing junk was out of it. If you have read any reports on the HF gun, for instance, you will see recommendations on initial clean. And they are correct, I had one that was loaded with crud. Having said that, when I know that I’m putting it away for a while, I take it apart and clean it thoroughly.

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moke

1502 posts in 3419 days


#3 posted 01-29-2020 06:13 PM

You might want to write a Review and include a couple of photos…..folks look there for recommendations.

-- Mike

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bilyo

1000 posts in 1745 days


#4 posted 01-30-2020 12:06 AM

Thanks Moke. I can certainly do that. What photos would you find useful? I’m not sure a photo of the gun or a glossy panel I sprayed with it would be very informative.

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moke

1502 posts in 3419 days


#5 posted 01-31-2020 06:10 PM

Maybe just of the gun as a whole and any other close up of features that are outstanding. It would show people the product to look for, not sure the sprayed panel would show what you want….too small.
I look forward to reading it!!!

-- Mike

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