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Help! I think I messed up in my design - creative ways to solve?

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Forum topic by WorksInTheory posted 01-29-2020 12:10 AM 521 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WorksInTheory

181 posts in 2232 days


01-29-2020 12:10 AM

Topic tags/keywords: bed rails hidden joinery bolts

So making a bed for my sister-in-law. But I made a fatal flaw in the design. Because the footboard has the panel, I can’t get access to attach the bed rails. I am not using a design that has those built in bed rail hardware.

Instead the idea was to have some metal heads showing for detail and sort of that rustic look. It was going to a bolt washer nut attach. But based on the pics below you can see I have to figure a different way of accomplishing that. Not sure just lag screwing right into it works? While she won’t take a part the bed many times, when she does move, she will and will it be ruined once taking apart in that it won’t reattach again?

The other idea other than lag screw was embed the nut and washer before assembling the panel to the posts and then have some sort of pan or truss head bolt and bolt in.


12 replies so far

View Tim Lanier's profile

Tim Lanier

5 posts in 365 days


#1 posted 01-29-2020 12:17 AM

Lag bolts will give you the rustic look you want but it seems like they’d be pretty hard on the wood if you’re wanting to be able to take the bed apart and put it back together. I’ve had lag bolts strip out their holes the 2nd time I’ve tightened them.

Maybe this isn’t helpful since it’s not the rustic look you want, but I’ve had good luck with this kind of attachment for bed rails: https://www.rockler.com/heavy-duty-wrought-steel-bed-rail-fasteners-4-pack-select-size

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

558 posts in 357 days


#2 posted 01-29-2020 12:23 AM

Some heavy duty threaded inserts.

Use with Connector Bolts

View WorksInTheory's profile

WorksInTheory

181 posts in 2232 days


#3 posted 01-29-2020 12:23 AM

Thanks Tim – I always thought those racked a little bit and couldn’t understand how they could hold the bed together stably. Sort of a bad butt joint? Is this your experience or they pretty rock solid?


Lag bolts will give you the rustic look you want but it seems like they d be pretty hard on the wood if you re wanting to be able to take the bed apart and put it back together. I ve had lag bolts strip out their holes the 2nd time I ve tightened them.

Maybe this isn t helpful since it s not the rustic look you want, but I ve had good luck with this kind of attachment for bed rails: https://www.rockler.com/heavy-duty-wrought-steel-bed-rail-fasteners-4-pack-select-size

- Tim Lanier


View JayT's profile

JayT

6384 posts in 2841 days


#4 posted 01-29-2020 12:26 AM

I’d do a threaded insert or a recessed T-nut on the back side. Either would allow you to use a bolt intead of a lag screw.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

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WorksInTheory

181 posts in 2232 days


#5 posted 01-29-2020 12:36 AM

LeeRoyMan and JayT – threaded inserts! Hmm… okay researching – thanks for the great idea! I hope they make it for big enough bolts… or atleast i need the bolt head to be big and/or flat-ish.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

2388 posts in 2124 days


#6 posted 01-29-2020 12:53 AM

Maybe ‘bench’ bolts?
Ask you favorite search engine, for more like this:

http://www.veritastools.com/Products/Page.aspx?p=178

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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pottz

7907 posts in 1614 days


#7 posted 01-29-2020 12:58 AM



Lag bolts will give you the rustic look you want but it seems like they d be pretty hard on the wood if you re wanting to be able to take the bed apart and put it back together. I ve had lag bolts strip out their holes the 2nd time I ve tightened them.

Maybe this isn t helpful since it s not the rustic look you want, but I ve had good luck with this kind of attachment for bed rails: https://www.rockler.com/heavy-duty-wrought-steel-bed-rail-fasteners-4-pack-select-size

- Tim Lanier

i used those on this bed i made recently,there solid as a rock and very easy to take apart when needed.
Click for details

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1736 posts in 536 days


#8 posted 01-29-2020 01:01 AM

I would also just get the bed hardware and be done. Costs you more just thinking about alternatives

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

828 posts in 1218 days


#9 posted 01-29-2020 01:03 AM

T-nuts:

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View AndyJ1s's profile

AndyJ1s

146 posts in 385 days


#10 posted 01-30-2020 05:14 AM



Maybe bench bolts?
Ask you favorite search engine, for more like this:

http://www.veritastools.com/Products/Page.aspx?p=178

- CaptainKlutz

I agree with this!

You can drill the holes for the brass “nuts” from the back side of the foot board posts, so they do not show from the front at all. This is fairly common hardware for knock-down furniture that is made to be disassembled and reassembled.

The threads are usually pretty standard, so you can choose different bolt lengths/materials/finishes/head-styles to suit your taste.

You could also counter-bore the side rails for the bolt heads, so the heads are below flush with the outside of the side rails. Then there are decorative “bed bolt covers” that can cover the counter-bore hole & bolt head, if so desired.

Andy – Arlington TX

-- Andy - Arlington TX

View Walker's profile (online now)

Walker

221 posts in 1102 days


#11 posted 01-30-2020 05:48 AM

Another vote for bench bolts, also known as cross dowels. I used these ones from Rocker on my workbench. They’re heavy duty, black, and a decent price. https://www.rockler.com/heavy-duty-cross-dowel-and-bolt-8-pack

You could also search for the appropriate size cross dowel and mate it with a carriage bolt to get the look you want. Like Andy mentioned, google “knock down hardware” for other options.

-- ~Walker

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AndyJ1s

146 posts in 385 days


#12 posted 01-31-2020 05:07 AM

You will need a way to tighten the bolt, since the nut/cross dowel cannot be turned on the bolt when it is in place.

So, a carriage bolt would not work. Unless you cut a slot in it for a screw driver…

A black oxide coated socket head screw, with a matching washer might be an option for you.

Andy

-- Andy - Arlington TX

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