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Forum topic by BobCysyk posted 01-28-2020 06:43 PM 398 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BobCysyk

34 posts in 3701 days


01-28-2020 06:43 PM

Hi Everybody,

Once again I am looking to this group for some advice.

I am in the middle of building a Bible Display case to hold a 100 year old bible for the local church. I have a silly but important question. The top of the display case is going to be approx. 24” by 16” sitting at a 15 degree angle. I am considering using 1/4” plate glass enclosed in an oak frame. I was wondering how to size the groove for the glass. I am thinking an extra 1/16” (5/16” total) to allow for seasonal wood movement. Also was wondering if 1/4” glass is overkill. I tried getting some advice from the local glass shop and they were reluctant offer any.

Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Bob


19 replies so far

View vjc's profile

vjc

5 posts in 1029 days


#1 posted 01-28-2020 09:22 PM

1/4 might be an over kill but who cares? You’re only making one case. I think the extra 1/16 should be fine. You might want something to cushion the glass in that 1/16 at each corner so you don’t get any rattle.

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John Smith

2199 posts in 805 days


#2 posted 01-28-2020 09:37 PM

I would make a rabbet for the glass the same way you would for a cabinet.
a wood or rubber quarter round to hold the glass in place securely.
1/16” gap all the way around the edges is adequate. the glass plate should
fig snuggly against the frame held in place with the quarter round.
that way, should the glass ever need to be replaced, it can be changed out
with little effort.
the object of the case is to protect the bible from oily human hands
and airborne contamination – not theft or vandalism.
1/8” tempered glass is very adequate. 3/16” is also good. (don’t overthink it).

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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BobCysyk

34 posts in 3701 days


#3 posted 01-28-2020 09:52 PM

Both are good suggesions. Thank you

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

854 posts in 1231 days


#4 posted 01-28-2020 10:49 PM

The seasonal movement of the wood is negligible in this application.

1/4” is too thick. Go to a frame shop and get a piece of UV resistant glass. Use spaceballs to hold the glass. Make the groove 1/4” deep and the glass 1/4” larger than the opening.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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therealSteveN

4915 posts in 1217 days


#5 posted 01-28-2020 11:17 PM

Agree with Spaceballs to quit the rattle potential.

What is the cost difference between thinner glass, and the 1/4”? If it isn’t much, it’s just a bigger dado. I’d stick with the original plan. 24×16 is a pretty big landing pad, and you know something gonna land on it.

-- Think safe, be safe

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John Smith

2199 posts in 805 days


#6 posted 01-29-2020 12:51 AM

glass rattle
maybe I’m missing something here – how does a piece of plate glass
rattle when it is in a wood frame sitting on a table or desk

is this a term used in the glazier field ?

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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SMP

1809 posts in 548 days


#7 posted 01-29-2020 12:53 AM


glass rattle
maybe I m missing something here – how does a piece of plate glass
rattle when it is in a wood frame sitting on a table or desk

is this a term used in the glazier field ?

.

.

- John Smith

Probably used to the builder grade cabinet doors that get opened and closed.For a display case I usually use 1/4 and clear silicone it in(or black or brown if thats better). I made the mistake of using 1/8 glass once. Cheaper just to spend the extra $5 on the 1/4 in the first place.

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BurlyBob

7095 posts in 2908 days


#8 posted 01-29-2020 01:01 AM

Like I mentioned on your blog. Don’t forget to use UV protective glass.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2199 posts in 805 days


#9 posted 01-29-2020 02:32 AM

and why UV protective glass ?
what makes it different or better than regular plate glass ?
I am thinking this bible display case will spend its whole life indoors
and never see the light of day with UV exposure.
will it provide protection from fading of the paper pages ?
I’ve never heard of this, that is why I am asking.

.

.

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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Madmark2

854 posts in 1231 days


#10 posted 01-29-2020 03:36 AM

UV glass protects the object from fading. It does not have to be in direct sunlight to fade. The ‘archival’ glass may also have a non reflection matte surface.

Any slop between the glass size and the groove depth will allow the glass to shift around. Space balls stop the slop without putting a lot of stress on the glass.

If this is a catholic bible you may want to add a compartment for candles and holy water to your design.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

913 posts in 553 days


#11 posted 01-29-2020 04:16 AM

UV plate glass, Evan if it’s not in direct sun light. If you already have 1/4” that would be ok, regular storm window thickness is what I’d shot for from the glass company. Lecturn style with a enclosed case sounds great for the display.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4915 posts in 1217 days


#12 posted 01-30-2020 09:16 AM

John, my experience with this type of enclosure to protect an older piece, especially books, and manuscripts, fall into 2 categories.

1) It’s a veritable shrine, and the enclosure is far away from anything else. Probably no trouble on the glass and rattle, but on either type protecting paper from any source of light is crucial. Google conserving valuable papers, books, and manuscripts. A lot of info on it, but links like the Smithsonian are the best for accuracy.

2) it’s just a box to protect something, or showcase it. A lot of times these boxes are part of the working church, and therefore can become a table, a writing stand, pulpit, and many other possibles. Here glass can/will move unless you add some shock absorption. I like SpaceBalls for that, some use caulk in the seam to stop the potential.

Could be any church, but I’ve found Catholics, and Jews to have the oldest items still out where common folks can see/visit/pay homage to them. Sometimes it’s not even a church, anymore local museums have a large amount of donations.

-- Think safe, be safe

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2199 posts in 805 days


#13 posted 01-30-2020 12:00 PM

ok, got it about the UV glass.
I have made several display cases for Guvmit buildings that displayed
irreplaceable photos and documents and the Guvmit provided the specs
to be followed precisely. in none of the instructions was UV protection mentioned.
and, small fluorescent lights often were in the case to illuminate the articles.
and we know how strict and overwhelming Mil-Specs can be !!!
(perhaps the UV resistant glass was not available at that time).
so now, this has peaked my interest.
thanks ! (I see the light now).

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View SMP's profile

SMP

1809 posts in 548 days


#14 posted 01-30-2020 02:21 PM



ok, got it about the UV glass.
I have made several display cases for Guvmit buildings that displayed
irreplaceable photos and documents and the Guvmit provided the specs
to be followed precisely. in none of the instructions was UV protection mentioned.
and, small fluorescent lights often were in the case to illuminate the articles.
and we know how strict and overwhelming Mil-Specs can be !!!
(perhaps the UV resistant glass was not available at that time).
so now, this has peaked my interest.
thanks ! (I see the light now).

.

- John Smith

I’ve also been to Shakespeare’s birth home, where an original copy of his work is in a display case. It managed to survive 400 years without UV glass, similar to how this bible survived 100. But now all of a sudden its a necessity! Lol!

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4915 posts in 1217 days


#15 posted 01-30-2020 09:09 PM

I think the current rage to protect everything old from what some items seem to have been through for ages, is driven by people with degrees now, calling themselves conservators. In cases where it is good old Mother Earth being protected I think they are called environmentalists.

Makes me wonder sometimes if a lot of education causes you to lose sight of anything historic. Otherwise I gots no answer to the why right now pandemonium. Eeeeks loudly, and runs around screaming about falling sky.

On a simpler, and possibly idgit driven front, out in Vegas they have close to town, Red Rock Canyon, where you can see some petroglyphs (rock carvings done by ancestors of today’s Pueblo people) they are conveniently covered with dirty, almost vision proof plexiglass, so the troubled yoots don’t spray paint them anymore. The fact you can hardly see them troubles no one, well maybe me. Meanwhile further outside of Vegas up 11 is Valley of Fire, where petroglyphs are simply everywhere, no plexiglass, and they don’t look any different than they probably did 1000 or more years ago, when they were etched into the rock. Evidently too far for the yoots to drive, or ride their bikes?

-- Think safe, be safe

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