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Do you consider this design structurally solid enough ? (2'x8'x36" table using 2x4)

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Forum topic by MiniMe posted 01-28-2020 03:01 PM 1114 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MiniMe

387 posts in 691 days


01-28-2020 03:01 PM

Hi guys

I am building the table below inspired by this blog https://fixthisbuildthat.com/how-to-build-a-diy-work-table/
I added or changed a couple of elements specif to my needs.

One of the is the size (see the picture). I am not sure if the middle vertical posts should be installed like in the picture using pocket holes (I have the kreg jig but not sure about what screw size I should use) or install the verticals on the exterior side of the frame and put more screws (3-4) .

As represented in the picture I think the table is solid enough to support efforts directed along the traversal direction (keep in mind that the bottom storage area will support heavy tools stored there -ex DeWalt portable saw) but I am not sure about its capability to support a push along the longitudinal axis (red arrow) ..what do you guys think about it? (it might be kind of late to ask after I already built the top and the bottom frame)


14 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

8738 posts in 2790 days


#1 posted 01-28-2020 03:13 PM

If you put the vertical supports on the outside of the upper and lower aprons, all the shear loading is held in the screws. Use nails instead. If you put the support between the aprons, then the wood is bearing all the load. I would put the wood between the aprons. If you can, half lap it, but if not pocket screws or some triangular plywood bracing over the joint would stiffen it up considerably and prevent any racking.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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Madmark2

848 posts in 1228 days


#2 posted 01-28-2020 03:22 PM

^+1. Mount the corner posts like the middle posts, between the top and bottom, not on the ends.

You also might want a front to back stiffener in the middle of that 8’ span. Just for rigidity.

Generally you want the screw to extend into the fixed piece to a depth equal to the thickness of the attaching piece. If you’re screwing a 1-1/2” thick piece you would usually use a 3” screw. Of course you always want to pilot/clearance drill before putting in the screws to prevent splitting and maximize holding power. Also lube the screws with wax or soap to ease driving them in.

M

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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sras

5310 posts in 3769 days


#3 posted 01-28-2020 03:54 PM

Do you need all sides open?

If not, consider adding a plywood panel to the back, one or both sides, and maybe the middle.

If you wish to keep all sides open, follow the advice above and maybe consider adding corner braces between the legs and top.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

387 posts in 691 days


#4 posted 01-28-2020 04:04 PM


Do you need all sides open?

If not, consider adding a plywood panel to the back, one or both sides, and maybe the middle.

If you wish to keep all sides open, follow the advice above and maybe consider adding corner braces between the legs and top.

- sras


Bingo…some decking hardware might help. good idea, thank you
Yes I would like to keep them open as I might move the bench in a room traversal position (now it is along the long wall of my garage) and I want to be able to access the equipment stored on the lower table easily
The end posts have to be like that so I can use them as a end of the bench vise if I wish :-))
I also have to find a way to install the below which will serve both the bench and the TS. I might end up attaching it at the left end of the table using brackets

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MiniMe

387 posts in 691 days


#5 posted 01-28-2020 08:09 PM

Ok to install the middle posts I could use two of these at each end of the post

like so

Not sure if I still need pocket screws,I don’t think so

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13067 posts in 3020 days


#6 posted 01-28-2020 08:33 PM

Since you already started, I would build it as-is with corner gussets/brackets and you’ll be fine.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View vjc's profile

vjc

5 posts in 1026 days


#7 posted 01-28-2020 09:11 PM

What kind of work do you intend to do on this table? Is that a vise on the left side? Are those dog holes on the top?

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

387 posts in 691 days


#8 posted 01-28-2020 11:34 PM


What kind of work do you intend to do on this table? Is that a vise on the left side? Are those dog holes on the top?

- vjc


Yes vise on both sides :-)

I will use it for light work, the heaviest piece being cabinets
consider it flat for now, no bench dogs, I might add them later for a section of the table
I am also thinking about adding T tracks
When I need to deal with larger pieces of wood but not too heavy I would add a piece of flat 4×9 MDF or plywood on top and clamp it to the ends (or use the wings in the picture below -need to figure out a way to lock them in place). It might be too much but I will see how that goes. For now think it as a dual purpose, narrower bench to work on and keep power tools like a small drill, a 10” miter saw and probably a small saw…as explained above it will also be an outfeed for the TS next to it

View John_'s profile

John_

232 posts in 2346 days


#9 posted 01-29-2020 01:41 AM

I am a big fan of the Experimental Aircraft Association work table. It used double up 2×4’s for the legs and would be easily adapted to fit your specific size

http://www.eaa1000.av.org/technicl/worktabl/tablefig.htm

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

387 posts in 691 days


#10 posted 01-29-2020 03:27 AM

My table is on wheels (4”) and the frames that support the top and the bottom are built already
I would rather add metal braces to my design

View SMP's profile

SMP

1792 posts in 545 days


#11 posted 01-29-2020 03:38 AM

Build it, use it. See if it racks. Wherever it does, buy the L brackets or plates(get the thick ones, don’t cheese out). The brackets will stiffen it up. Its a functional bench, not trying to win any beauty pageants. Plus sounds like you are doing more DIY/pocket hole stuff? If so then its not being subjected to sheer forces like if you were doing hand tool work.

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MiniMe

387 posts in 691 days


#12 posted 01-29-2020 04:14 AM



Build it, use it. See if it racks. Wherever it does, buy the L brackets or plates(get the thick ones, don’t cheese out). The brackets will stiffen it up. Its a functional bench, not trying to win any beauty pageants. Plus sounds like you are doing more DIY/pocket hole stuff? If so then its not being subjected to sheer forces like if you were doing hand tool work.

- SMP


Has to be slick …otherwise my wife is not going to like it and I will have no explaination for the hours spent here, in garage or in HD ..damn it is hard to find the right screws for 4” casters , thick enough to hold and to fit the plate holes AND not to split the wood

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MiniMe

387 posts in 691 days


#13 posted 01-30-2020 04:13 AM

ok the table is up and on wheels, no top/bottom attached but it holds without brackets … I will see how it behaves when I put some load on it.
I am so happy, I paid attention to measurements and angles and everything aligned perfectly !
If it is stable and solid I will post the build details to save others some time.
Now I need to figure out the adjustable height and the vise parts of this project
I also plan to add accessories to allow me to use the portable table saw attached at one end to turn the table in a miter saw station. T tracks and bench holes ?! Don’t know yet

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2693 posts in 3584 days


#14 posted 01-30-2020 04:52 AM

Consider the minor changes you can see in these carts I’ve built for decades. My 2’x4’ carts support about five hundred pounds without a creak or groan.

One of the pictures in my post shows the cart with a cabinet on top, which was made using three sheets of plywood and weighed about 150 to two hundred pounds. To finish it, I had to crawl inside, while it was on the cart.

I posted details of the build on the Instructables web site at:

https://www.instructables.com/id/Build-a-Heavy-Duty-Mobile-Shop-Cart/

Key is the simple change in the vertical supports.

In a pinch, you could add the ninety degree supports after the fact.

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