LumberJocks

Anyone use one of the Veritas plane fences? or Stanly 95?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by SMP posted 01-28-2020 02:37 PM 271 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View SMP's profile

SMP

1736 posts in 536 days


01-28-2020 02:37 PM

I am curious if anyone uses one of the Veritas plane fences. I know there is one for 90 and there is an adjustable one. I sometimes struggle with getting edges planed perfectly square, and often times have to check every foot or so, mark in pencil and go back, rinse , repeat. I know I could probably just build up skill to get this down. But was curious if people use either the fence or a dedicated plane like the Stanley 95 or LN equivalent to get square edges. I also need to plane some edges at 10 degrees on a project, so thought the adjustable fence would be nice for that to set at 100 degrees and get consistent. Curious others thoughts on this.


6 replies so far

View Thorbjorn88's profile

Thorbjorn88

109 posts in 772 days


#1 posted 01-28-2020 03:29 PM

I’ve got one. I use it with my Veritas LAJ and my no 7. It works well, I use it when I’m edge jointing a lot of boards. But if I’m not batching out stuff I don’t use it so that I don’t loose the ability to do it free hand.

It has two holes that you could attach a piece of wood with the correct angle to in order to get consistent edges.

-- Dave

View KYtoolsmith's profile

KYtoolsmith

122 posts in 490 days


#2 posted 01-28-2020 03:31 PM

I most often use rough sawn lumber and squaring the edges is a common task. I use my workbench as a large shooting board. I clamp the board flat on top of a thin strip of plywood and use my hand plane on it’s side against the bench top. Quick and easy… If other than 90 degrees, make a tapered strip to place under the work piece.

Yes, I do have a Stanley 95… Getting dusty from lack of use!
Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

View SMP's profile

SMP

1736 posts in 536 days


#3 posted 01-28-2020 03:43 PM



I most often use rough sawn lumber and squaring the edges is a common task. I use my workbench as a large shooting board. I clamp the board flat on top of a thin strip of plywood and use my hand plane on it s side against the bench top. Quick and easy… If other than 90 degrees, make a tapered strip to place under the work piece.

Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

- KYtoolsmith

Interesting. I’ve been meaning to make a shooting board per Tim Rousseau’s model. The only issue I have now is my jack plane is not square to the side. But something like this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwYJhfChDdM

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1512 posts in 1070 days


#4 posted 01-28-2020 06:13 PM

If you have a plane set up for attaching a guide/fence then I think you are on the right track. I put one on a Stanley jointer and really like it. I used a fence from an old B&D power planer. The jointer was a rust bucket and took a lot of work to get it usable again so drilling some holes in the side of that one seemed better than drilling some of the other planes I have.

I liked the looks of the Veritas fence but didn’t want to turn loose of the money for it.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View Eric's profile

Eric

163 posts in 868 days


#5 posted 01-29-2020 02:11 PM

I have the adjustable version that bolts directly to the veritas bevel up jointer. I’m not able to keep the jointed edge straight and true for longer plank without some help. The fence works well for me, I can make a square, true edge for 5-6 feet. And I thought the price is reasonable too. If you’re struggling to joint square edges it’s a great training aid.

-- Eric

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

625 posts in 285 days


#6 posted 01-29-2020 02:44 PM

I use a mixture of what KYToolSmith posted as well as my Stanley 95. My current bench is a little on the short side since it was built for my old one car garage shop. It has plenty of clamping and peg support along the front so long stock can be jointed in the vertical position. I’ve gotten pretty good at not needing the 95 but i often use it just to check my edges.

When i was learning to joint edges 10 deg would have been no big deal. Just try to joint it at 90 and I’d probably get 10 deg by happy accident.

I found this video from HNT Gordon to be pretty thorough for different types of material holding. About the midway point he gets into his shooting boards but the whole thing is worth a watch if you have the time.

Depending on how often you need to joint different degrees I would either just build a version of the Tim Rousseau that was at 10 deg or maybe something adjustable that had dados on the back side that i could put different wedges in to achieve the angle I want. Now that i typed that out i might have to build one.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com