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Routing in End Grain??

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Forum topic by BburgBoy posted 01-26-2020 11:13 PM 512 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BburgBoy

61 posts in 1133 days


01-26-2020 11:13 PM

I’m afraid this may be a dumb question. Is it possible to route in end grain? I’m working on some end grain cutting boards and trying to create handle indentations using a box cutting bit. Been a disaster so far. See photos. I suspect that I might be trying to squeeze square pegs in round holes, mix oil and water….or whatever metaphor indicates an impossible task. Any thoughts from the LJ community?

Wood is walnut, cherry, and maple.

-- Larry, SW Virginia


13 replies so far

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3118 posts in 4068 days


#1 posted 01-26-2020 11:25 PM

Hmmm. i route in endgrain and it comes out okay. The top edge is smooth, the bottom edge isn’t. I’m wondering if there’s something wrong with the bottom edge of your bit? I looks like you might be routing the wood there off the blade maybe. Hard to tell from just what is seen in the picture.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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SMP

1736 posts in 536 days


#2 posted 01-27-2020 12:16 AM

Can you post a pic of your bit? I usually use one with a bearing for this and take several passes, starting light and increase depth each one.

View HuckleberryWoodWrks's profile

HuckleberryWoodWrks

45 posts in 33 days


#3 posted 01-27-2020 12:52 AM

Almost looks like it might be fed too fast, or more likely the speed set too high. I don’t know about others, but this looks similar to what happens when I have my speed set too high.

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BFamous

339 posts in 751 days


#4 posted 01-27-2020 01:07 AM

I’m going with its the bit type you are using, combined with how you are trying to use it. I’m assuming you are routing with the face of your board down,and it looks like you have the depth of the cut just slightly past the center of the bit, creating a “lip” for someone’s fingers to grab. That lip is what looks like it is getting chewed because there is just not enough wood to give it support

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

818 posts in 178 days


#5 posted 01-27-2020 01:08 AM

^^^^
Dont try to hog it all off in one pass. Use a sharp, quality bit. Slow down speed, but often you will see burns when speed is too high, especially in maple or cherry. I dont see burns here. I suspect the bit.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: If you tell the truth, you dont have to remember anything (S. Clemens) Edit: Now where is that darn pencil/ tape measure!

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CaptainKlutz

2394 posts in 2125 days


#6 posted 01-27-2020 01:13 AM

+1 which router bit?

The ridges in the cut, mean some part of fence or bit is moving. Sort of like using a 1/4” shaft bit and cutting to much depth, too fast in single pass? DAMHIK

BTW – if you attempt to cut a side profile that exceeds 1/2 the box bit width, the cutter surface past top is running opposite to your feed direction. This creates shear and random tear out. The small raised ‘lip’ at the edge of tear out you have is what it looks like when bit is too deep?

Best Luck.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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WoodenDreams

908 posts in 541 days


#7 posted 01-27-2020 01:22 AM

Try shallower passes using more passes to get to your final depth. With the pic, is this with a new bit or a worn bit that could use sharpening

View HuckleberryWoodWrks's profile

HuckleberryWoodWrks

45 posts in 33 days


#8 posted 01-27-2020 01:47 AM



^^^^
Dont try to hog it all off in one pass. Use a sharp, quality bit. Slow down speed, but often you will see burns when speed is too high, especially in maple or cherry. I dont see burns here. I suspect the bit.

- wildwoodbybrianjohns

Good point on the burn marks.

View BburgBoy's profile

BburgBoy

61 posts in 1133 days


#9 posted 01-27-2020 02:33 AM



Can you post a pic of your bit? I usually use one with a bearing for this and take several passes, starting light and increase depth each one.

- SMP

SMP – Here it is. Just a simply box cutting bit.

-- Larry, SW Virginia

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BburgBoy

61 posts in 1133 days


#10 posted 01-27-2020 02:45 AM

Thank you all for your suggestions. For the record, I was using a speed of 2 of 6 on my Bosch router in a router table (I suspect that’s about 10-12K RPM). Not too fast. I was exerting plenty of pressure to ensure the board didn’t bounce up.

As was suggested by BFamous and Captain Klutz, I line up the fence at exactly the halfway point on the bit. Thus, I might be biting a bit too deep into the wood. The depth is about half the height of the bit. That’s not been a problem on other cutting boards, but might be too much for all this end-grain hardwood.

As I examine the photos more closely, I can see the effect of setting the fence so it cuts too deeply into the wood. I think, I’ll set it more shallow and give it another pass. As you might imagine, it’s taken a lot of gluing and sanding to get to this point on a plaid cutting board. Don’t want to screw it up now….

-- Larry, SW Virginia

View PBWilson1970's profile

PBWilson1970

29 posts in 24 days


#11 posted 02-03-2020 07:45 PM

I wonder if you’ve gone past the centerline and the opposite side of the bit is pulling out the grain instead of cutting into it.

Great looking board! Some work with a file and/or sandpaper will fix the tearout in time.

-- I love the smell of sawdust in the morning.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3481 posts in 2979 days


#12 posted 02-03-2020 08:54 PM

Try a cove bit with a guide bushing. I’d also say it was pulling some what based on the vertical lines in the cut. You were cutting from right to left?

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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Andybb

2486 posts in 1234 days


#13 posted 02-03-2020 09:27 PM

IMO burning is also an issue of moving the stock too slow across the bit, regardless of speed of the router.

I wonder if you ve gone past the centerline and the opposite side of the bit is pulling out the grain instead of cutting into it.

Great looking board! Some work with a file and/or sandpaper will fix the tearout in time.

- PBWilson1970


+1 You might try a larger radius bit and set the edge only as deep as the crown of the bit. You don’t need a hand hold, just enough to grab it with.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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