LumberJocks

hand plane question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by Karda posted 01-26-2020 06:57 AM 635 views 0 times favorited 48 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Karda's profile

Karda

2046 posts in 1190 days


01-26-2020 06:57 AM

I am looking for a plane, I can fix up. I am new to plane and don’t know much about them. are there any brands to avoid, older brands i know the big box planes are not so good if they do work. The only information I have been able to find is history. Thanks Mike


48 replies so far

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

625 posts in 291 days


#1 posted 01-26-2020 08:24 AM

If you’re new to planes I’m going to assume you’re looking for a smoother or jack size. In Stanley sizes that is a 4 or 5.

For brands I would stick with what I call the big 3 which are Miller Falls, Stanley, and Sargent. All Craftsman were made by one of these 3 to my knowledge and reasonably priced for solid users. The lateral adjuster is usually a pretty good sign to see who made it. All of the 3 brands I listed used a different style adjuster. Don, Bandit and others may have more detailed info on that.

I’m a Stanley man myself so that’s what I recommend. My favorite users are types 13 thru 15 but the type 18 and 19 will probably be an easier fix. You can usually find them in better condition than pre-war models.

I just recently restored a Miller Falls type 3 no. 9 (#4 in Stanley) and its been a really nice user. I got it off ebay for about $40 bucks including shipping.

If you’ve never refurbished and tuned one I would start with this Paul Seller’s video.

Some people will say to stay away from corrugated bottom planes but I can’t tell the difference when using one. I just restored a couple Stanley sweetheart #4s with corrugated bottoms and those things are freaking awesome.

Technically just about any hand plane can be tuned to work very well. How well it stays true and how long it stays sharp makes the difference between a good one and a not so good one in my opinion.

I hope that answered some of your questions.

View Don W's profile

Don W

19494 posts in 3204 days


#2 posted 01-26-2020 01:25 PM

View GaryCK's profile

GaryCK

79 posts in 686 days


#3 posted 01-26-2020 01:28 PM

To add to the “type” conversation just a bit, a good guide for determining the type of a Stanley plane is at the link below. The type refers to when a Stanley plan was manufactured. Types 13-15 that sansoo22 prefers were manufactured from 1925-1932. I look for pre-World War II vintage planes as I understand the planes just weren’t built as well after that.

https://woodandshop.com/identify-stanley-hand-plane-age-type-study/

I’m a Stanley plane fan, too, but agree that understanding what you want to do with it would drive what you’re looking for. A daily user plane may well drive different needs than a plane you want to fix up and sell to try and turn a profit.

Looking for planes for which replacement parts are available is another thought. If you’re looking for a daily user plane, it might make sense to buy a new blade rather than refurbish a trashed one. Lee Valley sells replacement blades for several planes. Identifying what’s available might be useful to you when looking for the planes themselves.

https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/search?query=plane+blade

Good luck.

-- Gary, Wisconsin

View KYtoolsmith's profile

KYtoolsmith

126 posts in 497 days


#4 posted 01-26-2020 02:36 PM

+ 1 on all of the above responses. I am also in the older Stanley camp on hand planes. I’ve restored many planes, not all Stanley’s. The advantage of Stanley planes pre WW2 is simple availability and quality. I’ve resurrected many that had minor problems. I’d recommend a No. 5 as a first plane. Condition is all important. Never buy a broken tool! Several of us on Lumberjocks restore hand planes and have learned where to find candidates for restoration. Location is important. The regions that have the greatest number of planes are those where the woodworking trades flourished in the 1870 – 1940 periods. I’m sure a pm to sansoo, Don W, or myself will lead to acquiring a quality plane. I myself have provided planes to several of our members.
Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

View Karda's profile

Karda

2046 posts in 1190 days


#5 posted 01-26-2020 09:39 PM

Thanks for all the information, it helps now I have to find some planes to compare. I know where there is a craftsman but it looks newer.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

7068 posts in 2902 days


#6 posted 01-26-2020 10:09 PM

No one has mentioned this, but tread lightly. Buying and restoring hand planes can become a very serious addiction. Also I have not heard of a 12 step program to deal with said addiction.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1779 posts in 542 days


#7 posted 01-26-2020 10:33 PM

Are you looking to get one specifically to fix up “for fun”? Or do you want one ready to use? If the former I suggest getting an older Stanley #5, mainly because if you do end up needing a spare part that is beyond repair you can literally buy spare parts by the bucketful on eBay. And a jack plane can do various functions until you get more specialized planes.

View Karda's profile

Karda

2046 posts in 1190 days


#8 posted 01-26-2020 11:11 PM

T late I already have one plane I got at the junk store fixed it up and I am looking for another, spoke shaves as well. I am looking for a user. fixer upper would be more affordable

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

1037 posts in 1613 days


#9 posted 01-27-2020 03:13 AM

Have a block plane yet?

View Karda's profile

Karda

2046 posts in 1190 days


#10 posted 01-27-2020 03:53 AM

yea I inherited one, I can get a good cut with it but I have a hard time using it because of hand problems, if it had a front knob it would be better. is this a decent plane.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1779 posts in 542 days


#11 posted 01-27-2020 04:26 AM

For spokshave I kind of like the Stanley/record 151, its easy to adjust and get used to when starting out woth them.

View Karda's profile

Karda

2046 posts in 1190 days


#12 posted 01-27-2020 04:34 AM

I have one of the Chinese knock off 151s its great for a few strokes. I didn’t notice it but the blade was burned, the lower half is over heat blue. I can get it sharp but it don’t last. i am looking for a reasonable real 151. I might try to re-temper the blade.

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

625 posts in 291 days


#13 posted 01-27-2020 04:51 AM

If the spoke shave is a Stanley/Record style and not the Kunz variety you can get an iron for it at Hock Tools or Lee Valley for around $30 bucks. There’s nothing fancy about the 151 style spoke shave. All it needs is a flat mouth and a nice iron and you’re good to go.

View Karda's profile

Karda

2046 posts in 1190 days


#14 posted 01-27-2020 04:53 AM

this shave cost 8.94 not worth the price of a new blade. This is a case of a part costing more than the tool. I have seen blades on ebay but they are a minimum 15.00

View SMP's profile

SMP

1779 posts in 542 days


#15 posted 01-27-2020 05:02 AM



this shave cost 8.94 not worth the price of a new blade. This is a case of a part costing more than the tool. I have seen blades on ebay but they are a minimum 15.00

- Karda

A vintage “real” 151 should cost about $30.

showing 1 through 15 of 48 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com