LumberJocks

Is this a roughing gouge?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by Furnone posted 01-25-2020 11:37 PM 492 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Furnone's profile

Furnone

8 posts in 772 days


01-25-2020 11:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: chisel

I have had this Marples gouge for over 50 years and have turned thousands of things with it. It occurs to me though that it may be ground wrong.

If it’s a roughing gouge, all that I have seen are ground straight across. Should I do that?

-- I will not lower my quality standards, so up yours!


16 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7699 posts in 2836 days


#1 posted 01-25-2020 11:40 PM

I have had this Marples gouge for over 50 years and have turned thousands of things with it. It occurs to me though that it may be ground wrong.
- Furnone

If you have been using it that long and for thousands of projects, I’d say it’s ground perfectly – why mess with something that ain’t broken?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

932 posts in 540 days


#2 posted 01-25-2020 11:54 PM

You clearly have more experience with woodturning than most people on this site. Why would you trust their advice?

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5740 posts in 4300 days


#3 posted 01-26-2020 01:05 AM

The grind is just fine … the wings on my Spindle Roughing Gouge are ground back about the same amount … makes planing cuts much easier.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2690 posts in 3581 days


#4 posted 01-26-2020 06:03 AM

Is it broke? Fix it. However, like Mr Unix says, it doesn’t sound broke.

Oh, and when we had Stewart Batty for a demonstration to our group, his roughing gouge was a half inch spindle gouge much of the time. So…

View Furnone's profile

Furnone

8 posts in 772 days


#5 posted 01-26-2020 02:24 PM

OK, I ask for help because I continue to learn, even at 75…

Here’s my story…In 1964, along with my childhood friend, we started a custom furniture shop in Bridgeport, CT.
We began making custom furniture, mostly for local interior decorators. Gradually, we progressed into production manufacturing of the heavy pine furniture popular in that era. We grew to a 50,000 sq.ft. plant with 110 employees and then slid to an end in 1984. I became a rep for other furniture manufacturers for the next 35 years.

I began with a Craftsman round tube lathe, graduated in a few years to an old Oliver lathe that we extended the bed to 72” to make pencil post beds.

Although the Oliver remained until we closed (wish I still had it), we upgraded to a Mattison automatic shaping lathe. That’s me in the attached pic around 1970. The Mattison lathe was not hooked up yet in the photo, all those pedestal bases were hand turned by me using that rouging gouge and a skew (still use that too). I also turned a 9” version of those pedestal posts.

Now I have a 15’ square shop under my sunroom and bought a Rikon 70-1218VS midi lathe. I am just starting to turn bowls, candlesticks etc. so I am a novice at this. I’m going to keep the Marples as it is and look for a new roughing gouge to see if I like that. I also bought a set of Carter Axe carbide chisels at the Springfield Woodworking show. I think I like them but not sure yet.

Thanks for your responses.

Where it started…

Where it ended…

-- I will not lower my quality standards, so up yours!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4660 posts in 2024 days


#6 posted 01-26-2020 03:25 PM

Looks like a roughing gouge that was basically shaped into a giant spindle gouge. With a traditional RG, you address the wood at a 90° angle to it length. By rounding the corners back you can come in at an angle. As has been said, if it works the way you like to use, why “fix it”. In fact, if you were to change back to a traditional shape, you would probably have problems because your 50 years of muscle memory would cause you to angle it and the results would not be pretty.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

576 posts in 1715 days


#7 posted 01-26-2020 03:43 PM

BUT!!! don’t use it as a bowl gouge or spindle gouge because the tang isn’t as strong as the others

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4660 posts in 2024 days


#8 posted 01-26-2020 03:51 PM

I think that as long as he uses it on spindle orientation, Jack, it should be fine. Besides, it sounds like he has been using it that way for 50 years. (I agree that it should not be used like a bowl gouge where the end grain is turned sideways).

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

699 posts in 1938 days


#9 posted 01-27-2020 05:04 AM

The second pic shows that it is probably not a spindle roughing gouge; instead it is a Continental Spindle Gouge. It is ground correctly if I am seeing the picture right.
Many European makers still offer that style as well as spindle gouges milled from a bar of round stock.
Here is a link to the Sorby continental style spindle gouges. I believe Al Furtado uses one quite often in his videos.
https://www.robert-sorby.co.uk/b839082-continental-style-spindle-gouges
Probably find similar offerings at Hamlet, Crown, Ashley Iles, ect…...

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2545 posts in 2626 days


#10 posted 01-27-2020 01:16 PM

I agree that it looks to be a ~1-1/4” continental spindle gouge. Furnone, a roughing gouge will have taller “sides”, so if you want a close replacement you are looking for a continental style. Crown tools also has them.

View Eric's profile

Eric

163 posts in 874 days


#11 posted 01-27-2020 01:27 PM

I bought a set of eight Freud lathe chisels 30 years ago and there are chisels just like OPs and they’re called “spindle gouges” on the box label. The sides came ground back like OPs Marples. I bought a “roughing gouge” a few months ago from Hurricane, it’s squared up. When I use the Google I see terms interchanged as “roughing gouge”, “spindle gouge” and “spindle roughing gouge” but only see two grinds, squared up and ground back.

I have nowhere near the experience of OP but back in the day the spindle gouge grind was very common. Used one in shop class in the early 70s. It’s my favorite as a beginner/intermediate level turner.

-- Eric

View Furnone's profile

Furnone

8 posts in 772 days


#12 posted 01-27-2020 03:36 PM

Great to know, after all these years, what I have.

Sad to learn how little I really know about turning after all these years….well, hopefully, I still have a few years to catch up.

Thanks for the enlightenment.

-- I will not lower my quality standards, so up yours!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

12263 posts in 1775 days


#13 posted 01-27-2020 07:55 PM

You can take a heavier cut if you square it off and put a steeper bevel on it like a roughing gouge. Personally, I’d leave it as is. I don’t have a gouge that big with a lower, swept-back grind like that but sometimes I wish I did :-) And I’ve never heard of a Continental Gouge but it’s on my radar now. I love this site ;-)


...

Sad to learn how little I really know about turning after all these years….well, hopefully, I still have a few years to catch up.

...

- Furnone

Says anyone who’s ever turned wood whether it’s been 1 year or 70!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View RichBolduc's profile

RichBolduc

1241 posts in 753 days


#14 posted 01-27-2020 08:11 PM

Generally they are straight across but I know a lot of turners that grind off the corners to help prevent catches. I’d grind it to 35 degrees and call it a day.

Rich

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

699 posts in 1938 days


#15 posted 01-28-2020 03:22 AM

I only have one of that design but I use it often in spindle work (3/4” W). I use it as a detail gouge; similar to a Thompson detail gouge but wider. The shallow wings allows you to get into tight places like when turning beads. Mine is old also (not HSS) but just a few passes with a diamond hone brings it back. I only use mine for light or finesse cuts.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com