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Forum topic by MikeDe posted 01-25-2020 06:55 AM 359 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MikeDe

53 posts in 3322 days


01-25-2020 06:55 AM

I have been trying to buy some of these in the Detroit Metro Area ever since I saw them in the parking lot
of a local hospital , they are used to funnel the water away from the edge of the concrete where it meets
brick wall. Try as I may, and I have used all kinds of caulk to seal mine I have no luck .
These things look like they will work but I don’t know what they called so I have had no luck
searching the internet.

If there is anyone out there that knows what they are called or where I can buy them I would like to know

Thanks
Mike De


6 replies so far

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CaptainKlutz

2398 posts in 2125 days


#1 posted 01-25-2020 08:30 AM

Don’t know where to buy it.

But I have seen that same rubber/vinyl inside cove trim on EPDM coated roofs?

You can also buy vinyl ‘cove formers’ and ‘pvc skirting with cove edge’, commonly used in commercial building’s to enable flooring to wrap up the wall. Would be pretty easy to re-purpose a cove former with roofing cement to make that seal line?

Maybe call a commercial roofing and/or flooring company, as trim pieces are like buying tack strips for carpet – only the installer knows that tack strips come in different widths with different height tacks?

Thanks for reading my SWAG.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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therealSteveN

4857 posts in 1205 days


#2 posted 01-25-2020 09:59 AM

That exact look, I’m not sure? The basic concept do searches for Ground gutter, rain trench, trench drain.

A Home Depot link below, be mindful every HD may not carry them, but you can order to the store, or better yet, print that pic, and bring it to the local HD, Lowes, Menards, and ask what they suggest. Also a lot of this type of thing is made for putting into wet concrete/cement.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/U-S-TRENCH-DRAIN-Compact-Series-5-4-in-W-x-3-2-in-D-x-39-4-in-L-Trench-and-Channel-Drain-Kit-with-Black-Grate-3-Pack-9-8-ft-83500-3/302782641?mtc=Shopping-VF-F_Vendor-G-D26P-26_1_PIPE_AND_FITTINGS-Generic-NA-Feed-PLA-NA-NA-PIPE_AND_FITTINGS_General&cm_mmc=Shopping-VF-F_Vendor-G-D26P-26_1_PIPE_AND_FITTINGS-Generic-NA-Feed-PLA-NA-NA-PIPE_AND_FITTINGS_General-71700000055362041-58700005218218023-92700046076001374&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI1sSD2r2e5wIVA6SzCh22wwg8EAQYBSABEgL4kfD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

-- Think safe, be safe

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John Smith

2171 posts in 793 days


#3 posted 01-25-2020 12:01 PM

Mike – is that item wood, plastic or concrete ??
how many linear feet do you need ?
by looking at the 2×8 bricks, the gutter appears to be about 4”.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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MikeDe

53 posts in 3322 days


#4 posted 01-25-2020 02:07 PM



Mike – is that item wood, plastic or concrete ??
how many linear feet do you need ?
by looking at the 2×8 bricks, the gutter appears to be about 4”.

.

- John Smith


Mike – is that item wood, plastic or concrete ??
how many linear feet do you need ?
by looking at the 2×8 bricks, the gutter appears to be about 4”.

.

- John Smith


View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

996 posts in 1850 days


#5 posted 01-27-2020 05:07 PM

thats not a good place for caulk to be used. have you tried a self leveling expansion joint sealant?
how about a picture of what ya have to work with?

View LesB's profile

LesB

2350 posts in 4074 days


#6 posted 01-27-2020 06:19 PM

It looks like a good way to redirect the rain water but even these have to be sealed at the edges with some fort of caulk/sealant. So the second question is how are they sealed?

It might be just as effective to use a water proofing paint which is used to seal basement walls. Or an epoxy coating over the surfaces. If you are looking for a curves gutter then add a cement cove first then the epoxy.

-- Les B, Oregon

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