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Can I use or store my Air Compressor in vertical position (horizontal cylinder)

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Forum topic by MiniMe posted 01-24-2020 04:54 PM 776 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MiniMe

387 posts in 688 days


01-24-2020 04:54 PM

I have one of these:

Can I remove the handle and put it in a vertical position , compressor facing me, cylinder against the wall
I know it accumulates water at the bottom that have to be removed, I don’t mind putting it back in horizontal position to deal with that when needed


27 replies so far

View JayT's profile

JayT

6386 posts in 2848 days


#1 posted 01-24-2020 04:57 PM

If it’s oil-less, then shouldn’t be a problem. If it uses oil for lubrication, then no.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

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MiniMe

387 posts in 688 days


#2 posted 01-24-2020 05:07 PM

FEATURES
Mastercraft 8 Gallon Air Compressor features 135 max PSI, 1.5 running HP and is oil free for less maintenance
Removable handle with grip and rubber wheels for mobility
Metal intake filter for durability
One quick coupler for universal use
Upward facing gauge allows users to easily monitor line pressure
Rated Air Flow: 4.8 CFM 40 PSI, 3.5 CFM 90 PSI
Working Pressure: 105-135 PSI
Product Dimensions: 25.7” x 11” x 24.6” (65.5×28 x 62.5 cm)
Net Weight: 50.9 lbs (23.1 kg)

It seems to be Oil free

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syenefarmer

549 posts in 3717 days


#3 posted 01-24-2020 09:07 PM

Just to be on the safe side, I’d secure it to the wall somehow with at least a bungy cord or some rope. When cycling the vibrations may want to make it dance a little and fall over.

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LittleBlackDuck

3672 posts in 1457 days


#4 posted 01-24-2020 09:39 PM

Sometimes RTFM doesn’t work… Confirm with the manufacturer/supplier… then follow JayT’s advice.

Having said that, if it used oil there should be a visible oil plug.

seyene’ is singing the Beach Boys’, _Good, good, good, good vibrations (oom bop bop)...

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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Andybb

2502 posts in 1240 days


#5 posted 01-25-2020 05:31 AM

Yes

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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KYtoolsmith

126 posts in 497 days


#6 posted 01-25-2020 01:18 PM

I give a resounding NO! Don’t mount it vertically! I just googled your compressor. It has an oil sump! Oil free only refers to the piston and therefore the compressed air being oil free. The crankshaft and connecting rod is still oil lubricated. A splash lube system depends on the crank dipping into the oil on every revolution. As to draining the moisture in the tank “when needed”, you should be draining EVERY time you turn it off. Moisture in the tank causes rust… Ultimately tank rupture.

Just my $.02 based on many years of operating and maintaining air compressors in the USN.

Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

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Kazooman

1426 posts in 2589 days


#7 posted 01-25-2020 01:25 PM

One other issue to consider would be cooling. Compressors get pretty hot. The plastic shroud on the unit has louvers and it was probably designed for convective air flow to remove the heat. If a vertical mounting position decreases the cooling capacity the compressor might run very hot and that could shorten its working life.

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MiniMe

387 posts in 688 days


#8 posted 01-25-2020 02:21 PM



One other issue to consider would be cooling. Compressors get pretty hot. The plastic shroud on the unit has louvers and it was probably designed for convective air flow to remove the heat. If a vertical mounting position decreases the cooling capacity the compressor might run very hot and that could shorten its working life.

- Kazooman


I don’t use it extensively especially where it sits now.
I am using it for these:
-restore the pressure for the tires of our cars
-in the winter I clean the snowblower before putting it back in the garage
-every 2 years to stain my deck
-probably use the nail guns as I will start doing more work (if I ever finish the damn dust collector I am working these days)
-empty the yard watering system before winter

I have never seen it even warm, I will have to see what happens when I do the deck (due this spring)

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MiniMe

387 posts in 688 days


#9 posted 01-25-2020 02:22 PM



I give a resounding NO! Don t mount it vertically! I just googled your compressor. It has an oil sump! Oil free only refers to the piston and therefore the compressed air being oil free. The crankshaft and connecting rod is still oil lubricated. A splash lube system depends on the crank dipping into the oil on every revolution. As to draining the moisture in the tank “when needed”, you should be draining EVERY time you turn it off. Moisture in the tank causes rust… Ultimately tank rupture.

Just my $.02 based on many years of operating and maintaining air compressors in the USN.

Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

- KYtoolsmith


I will take your word for it but where did you read about that ? (compressor using oil for certain things)

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KYtoolsmith

126 posts in 497 days


#10 posted 01-25-2020 03:03 PM

MiniMe, I learned this from my training courses in the USN, mechanical engineering schools and personal experience repairing compressors, engines, and hydraulics. My post USN career was teaching mechanical maintenance and writing technical manuals for equipment including compressors.
Small compressors of this type are built much like a single cylinder gasoline engine. The electric motor turns a crank shaft that is supported by bearings requiring lubrication. The crank throw carries a connecting rod that converts the rotation of the shaft to reciprocating motion. The conn rod has bearings on the crank end and the upper piston end that also require lubrication. The connecting rod is connected to a piston riding in a cylinder. On conventional non-oil free compressors, the piston is sealed to the cylinder by metal rings. This piston and piston rings are lubricated by the same oil as the crank and conn rod. In an oil free compressor, the piston rings are replaced by a diaphragm membrane that separates the oil sump / crankcase from the compression cylinder. On small engines and compressors the oil level is above the bottom stroke position of the crank, allowing the crank and conn rod to dip into the oil on every revolution, spreading oil to all bearings. If the oil level is not there because the compressor is turned vertically, the bearings will be starved for lubrication. This will cause metal to metal friction and near immediate failure due to overheating of the bearings. Final result; seized compressor!

OK… My $.50 The Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

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splintergroup

3290 posts in 1859 days


#11 posted 01-25-2020 03:41 PM

I recently rebuilt my oilless compressor (two cylinder, 5HP) and it used sealed bearings for the crank, no oil sump.

My guess is KY is describing a more “industrial” type compressor where quality matters 8^)

Every “cheap” oilless compressor I’ve dealt with has been made on the cheap, lots of aluminum castings and minimum parts count. Basically zero maintenance until something wears out (like my pistons and cylinders)

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MiniMe

387 posts in 688 days


#12 posted 01-25-2020 05:15 PM



MiniMe, I learned this from my training courses in the USN, mechanical engineering schools and personal experience repairing compressors, engines, and hydraulics. My post USN career was teaching mechanical maintenance and writing technical manuals for equipment including compressors.
Small compressors of this type are built much like a single cylinder gasoline engine. The electric motor turns a crank shaft that is supported by bearings requiring lubrication. The crank throw carries a connecting rod that converts the rotation of the shaft to reciprocating motion. The conn rod has bearings on the crank end and the upper piston end that also require lubrication. The connecting rod is connected to a piston riding in a cylinder. On conventional non-oil free compressors, the piston is sealed to the cylinder by metal rings. This piston and piston rings are lubricated by the same oil as the crank and conn rod. In an oil free compressor, the piston rings are replaced by a diaphragm membrane that separates the oil sump / crankcase from the compression cylinder. On small engines and compressors the oil level is above the bottom stroke position of the crank, allowing the crank and conn rod to dip into the oil on every revolution, spreading oil to all bearings. If the oil level is not there because the compressor is turned vertically, the bearings will be starved for lubrication. This will cause metal to metal friction and near immediate failure due to overheating of the bearings. Final result; seized compressor!

OK… My $.50 The Kentucky Toolsmith!

- KYtoolsmith


your $100 actually.
Having an engineering background myself I totally understand what you explained above and it makes total sense
I am glad I asked !! Thank you!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4660 posts in 2024 days


#13 posted 01-25-2020 06:31 PM

I would think that if there was an oil sump, you would eventually have to add to it or replace the oil from time to time. Looking at the schematic on page 22 in this manual, there appears to be fan in the diagram where a oil filled crankcase would be, unless this isn’t your compressor. If you take the plastic cover off, you may be able to see if there is a case around where the crank is. There should be a fill hole if it is oil filled. They would have to get the oil in there somehow, otherwise, it would probably just have grease which usually doesn’t rely on gravity or orientation to work.

My .02.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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MiniMe

387 posts in 688 days


#14 posted 01-25-2020 06:59 PM



I would think that if there was an oil sump, you would eventually have to add to it or replace the oil from time to time. Looking at the schematic on page 22 in this manual, there appears to be fan in the diagram where a oil filled crankcase would be, unless this isn t your compressor. If you take the plastic cover off, you may be able to see if there is a case around where the crank is. There should be a fill hole if it is oil filled. They would have to get the oil in there somehow, otherwise, it would probably just have grease which usually doesn t rely on gravity or orientation to work.

My .02.

- Lazyman


which number points to the crank you are mentioning above?

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Kazooman

1426 posts in 2589 days


#15 posted 01-25-2020 07:23 PM

I took a look at the manual lazyman referenced. I see that the compressor actually has a built in cooling fan. My prior comment is moot. However, the manual does list overheating in the troubleshooting section.

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