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Forum topic by William_D posted 01-24-2020 12:57 AM 582 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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William_D

32 posts in 1110 days


01-24-2020 12:57 AM

So, since I got my TS, I have used BoShield as a protector from rust. Only problem is it can be sitcky.

Due to that, I have switched to a wax. Renanicance wax to be specific. Question is, after you apply the wax do you wait for it to dry and buff, or just leave it as is?


20 replies so far

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

852 posts in 1229 days


#1 posted 01-24-2020 01:25 AM

Wait for it to haze out. Then buff.

I use Johnson’s Paste Floor Wax with good result.

M

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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CaptainKlutz

2471 posts in 2135 days


#2 posted 01-24-2020 01:41 AM

+1 Madmark2:

Apply wax, leaving behind a film.
Wait for film to dry to haze.
Then buff surface to remove excess.
(Can take 5-30 minutes depending on temp/humidity)

BTW – Renaissance wax is good, but can be expensive.
Next time you need more look for Staples Crystal Clear Wax. Wood craft carries it.
Same carnuaba wax base in a 1lb can costs less and you get 2-3x more in can.
Have both and can’t tell difference between them.
Although the smaller renaissance can fits better next the the hand planes. :-)
Cheers!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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William_D

32 posts in 1110 days


#3 posted 01-24-2020 01:50 AM

Thanks guys…. so how “creative” do you get with wax?

Saw blades? Mitre slots? Fence rails?

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William_D

32 posts in 1110 days


#4 posted 01-24-2020 01:52 AM



Wait for it to haze out. Then buff.

I use Johnson s Paste Floor Wax with good result.

M

- Madmark2

When I was at the 82nd, we would lite the can on fire, pour it on the floor and then buff it with buffers in our barracks. Don;t think I could use it on my TS, simply out of memories. :D.

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CaptainKlutz

2471 posts in 2135 days


#5 posted 01-24-2020 02:23 AM


Thanks guys…. so how “creative” do you get with wax?
Saw blades? Mitre slots? Fence rails?

- William_D

Blades?
No, it rubs off to fast.

Miter slot?
Always same time I wax top. Wax bar on miter gauge too.

Fence rails?
Hmm. Depends on design. Don’t want to wax the bare metal front side surface where a biesemeyer clamps down to the rail. But I wax top to ensure it slides easier.

Riving knife/Splitter?
Yes, it helps to prevent pitch sticking to surface.

I even wax my extension table and out-feed table.

But don’t wax the floors.
Need traction as you push 4×8 sheets across the saw.

LOL

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

7085 posts in 2906 days


#6 posted 01-24-2020 03:24 AM

I agree paste wax on all my stationary tools. However on my hand planes I stored for long periods of time. I use paraffin that i buy in a slab type form. I rub it on like deodorant stick, all the parts and side. It works like a champ and you don’t have to do any clean up before using the plane. Just rub more on before storing the plane.

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

1100 posts in 2275 days


#7 posted 01-24-2020 04:38 AM

I tried boeshield T-9 and didn’t like it at all for CI surfaces. I use Johnson’s paste wax.

William-D – I certainly recall those days when I was with the 9th Inf at Ft Lewis. After we spread the wax with the buffer and let it haze, we’d then put one of those fuzzy toilet seat covers over the buffing brush and bring it to a high gloss shine. Ah, the good ol’ days

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4907 posts in 1215 days


#8 posted 01-24-2020 05:13 AM

I wait then lightly hand rub it, then I get my HF gizmo out and let er rip. I can bump a piece of wood on one side of the TS, and it’ll slide off the other side. I use the absolute cheapest wax I can find. I tried some expensive stuff, and it didn’t make a bit of difference IMHO.

It was 39 bux when I bought it, but it was on a sidewalk sale for 14.99 and I used a 20% off coupon. That was back when HF was fun to shop at, before they got all of the rules. It has a sheepy wool cover, zoom zoom.

-- Think safe, be safe

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7719 posts in 2840 days


#9 posted 01-24-2020 06:52 AM

So, since I got my TS, I have used BoShield as a protector from rust. Only problem is it can be sitcky.
[...]Due to that, I have switched to a wax.
- William_D

BoShield is basically just paraffin wax and mineral oil in a solvent. It’s the oil that makes it seem sticky. For a lot less money, you can easily make your own and leave out the mineral oil. Just dissolve some paraffin wax in mineral spirits. Works great for dunking small hardware bits that are hard to wax by hand. A pound of paraffin can be had for a couple bucks at your local grocery store, and it will last a long, long, long time.

Having said that – here is another vote for Johnsons paste wax on machined cast iron.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

625 posts in 295 days


#10 posted 01-24-2020 09:24 AM

Renaissance Wax or other micro-crystalline waxes are a little different than a normal paste wax. They are meant to go on very thin and will pretty much harden instantly.

Also Renaissance wax is not carnauba based. It’s a petroleum based wax with other things like polyethylene or some other words i cant pronounce. The whole purpose of micro crystalline waxes is to avoid acids from carnauba and bees wax.

I wouldn’t wax a cast iron table saw with it unless its all i had on hand. But i do wax all of my hand planes with it. Handles are silky smooth with a nice micro crystalline wax applied correctly.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5988 posts in 3134 days


#11 posted 01-24-2020 11:31 AM



Thanks guys…. so how “creative” do you get with wax?

Saw blades? Mitre slots? Fence rails?

- William_D

Throw in your clamp bars (or pipes) to keep glue from sticking to them.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View William_D's profile

William_D

32 posts in 1110 days


#12 posted 01-24-2020 12:42 PM

Wow! Lots of great info guys!

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

667 posts in 2372 days


#13 posted 01-24-2020 02:22 PM

Frank’s RedHot and Johnson’s Paste Wax…....I put that @#$% on everything

View avsmusic1's profile

avsmusic1

583 posts in 1326 days


#14 posted 01-24-2020 02:37 PM

agree with others – save the Renaissance for something else and get yourself some cheaper stuff for the cast iron maintenance
i use jojoba oil on my planes – a little goes a looong way

View OnhillWW's profile

OnhillWW

213 posts in 1873 days


#15 posted 01-24-2020 03:31 PM

Everyone has their secret sauce, here is mine:
https://www.collinite.com/product/no-845-insulator-wax/
Either #845 o 476S. I live in a place where we use a LOT of salt on the roads in the winter and I only wax my cars in May and October – this stuff lasts. Everything in my shop that is cast iron gets it as well.

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

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