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First Aid Kit box. Looking for ideas

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Forum topic by Sark posted 01-23-2020 01:42 AM 476 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sark

244 posts in 1001 days


01-23-2020 01:42 AM

Topic tags/keywords: first aid tackle box tackle first aid box

Wondering if any of you have made a first aid box? I’d like to get some design ideas. Of course I could buy a tackle box or a metal painted-red first aid box, but that wouldn’t be any fun.

Just sorted our medicine cabinet, and a 2 gallon round plastic container stuffed with stuff that served (poorly) as our first-aid box for many years. Getting rid of a stack of ancient pharmaceuticals and think its time to have a real box, painted red, to easily grab what’s needed when needed when some medical urgency arises. Thanks.


27 replies so far

View HuckleberryWoodWrks's profile

HuckleberryWoodWrks

45 posts in 43 days


#1 posted 01-23-2020 01:58 AM

I have just a basic kit with some extra gauze to use as a pressure dressing in the event of an accident. Basics for self aid. The main stuff is things like bandaids for basic cuts. It’s in a clear lidded tool case hung on the wall with a first aid sticker.

Anything more then that you enter the realm of critical need where cutting a shirt into a strip wouldn’t be an issue. Beyond that, you cross the more harm then good area.

Even my trauma kit for going shooting doesn’t have much more advanced stuff then that for the same reasons.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1800 posts in 546 days


#2 posted 01-23-2020 03:41 AM

Roll of shop towels
Roll of duct tape

Built in first aid kit already on the pegboard wall.

View YouthfullMind's profile

YouthfullMind

62 posts in 792 days


#3 posted 01-23-2020 03:42 AM

I’ve been fortunate to not have had any major incidents. I keep a pack of spot bandages (Little round ones) and a pack of regular bandages. Seems to cover most issues I have ran into.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1254 posts in 3434 days


#4 posted 01-23-2020 04:41 AM

And electrical tape to keep bandages in place. It comes in a variety of coordinating colors to match your outfit. I have a nice kit in a plastic box on the wall, and when the contents expire, I buy a new one.

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HuckleberryWoodWrks

45 posts in 43 days


#5 posted 01-23-2020 04:49 AM

Wow, everyone seems to like tape and toilet paper. I grew up using napkins and tape myself, strangely enough, they make actual bandage material. It adheres well and covers the bandage to keep out foreign material. Think of that wrap the hospital uses when you get your blood drawn. It can actually be found cheaper then tape and sticks to its self so doesn’t matter if you get it a little wet or dusty. Just remember to change it to a CLEAN bandage after you leave the shop.

With how much everyone pushes safety on LJ, one would think health would be high on the list also. Especially considering the views of protecting your lungs from dust. Just some food for thought.

View Bobsboxes's profile

Bobsboxes

1443 posts in 3305 days


#6 posted 01-23-2020 05:16 AM

I have a small cabinet in my shop, with the usual clean rags, tape, bandaids, and I have added a clotting pack off of amazon. A few different brands. But they work the same way. I also added one of the clotting bandages to my pickup first aid kit, as I work all over a fairly rural area. I had a nasty cut to my leg from metal roofing, recently that woke me up to caring a few first aid items. I plan to put together a kit for our cabin also. Don’t get me wrong tape and paper towels can take care of a lot of dings.

-- Bob in Montana. Kindness is the Language the blind can see and deaf can hear. - Mark Twain

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Madmark2

852 posts in 1229 days


#7 posted 01-23-2020 05:40 AM

Uline and other industrial supply houses have safety kits. Copy the inventory and box size and paint it white with a nice red + on it.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Andre

3093 posts in 2447 days


#8 posted 01-23-2020 05:57 AM

First Aid Kit in the workshop? Why? A carpenter may have an accident but a true Wood Worker Never!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Sark's profile

Sark

244 posts in 1001 days


#9 posted 01-23-2020 06:15 AM

I thought all you cabinet makers out there would have created a special cabinet designed expressly for your medical supplies…but evidently not. OK I can get make a box and paint it white, per Madmark2. That’s within my pay grade.

I do like discussion of what should be included. The Uline inventory leaves out a few items that I think are mandatory particulary stop-the-bleed type bandages. Also splint. Asthma inhaler. Eye drops. Surgical-type tweezers. They also specify items that I need to purchase, such as instant cold-pack.

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

625 posts in 295 days


#10 posted 01-23-2020 06:16 AM

I bought an OSHA/ANSI kit off Amazon. You can get buy with a much smaller kit but I liked the metal box and the company I purchased from sells individual refill packs as things run out. Or if enough stuff is expired you can just buy a complete refill kit. I mounted the box to the wall next to the fire extinguisher. The price tag is a bit steeper but i figure i’ve got a lot more than that invested in tools and i’m one of those people that always picks up a cut or scrape out in the shop so may as well be over prepared.

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therealSteveN

4907 posts in 1215 days


#11 posted 01-23-2020 06:25 AM



Roll of shop towels
Roll of duct tape

- SMP

Add to this collection a few large size band aids, and some antibiotic goop. Keep it all in a snap top plastic tub to keep the dirt/dust/cooties out.

If you get something in your eye, get the heck out of the shop. Get into a shower, and try to gently wash whatever is in there out. ASAP. Failure to do so you will probably get a corneal abrasion, and will end up needing further medical care. No self Doctoring your eyes, especially in a shop with potential for a lot of dust in the air. This is why they have eye wash stations in places of work.

-- Think safe, be safe

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

2471 posts in 2135 days


#12 posted 01-23-2020 06:46 AM

#IMAKLUTZ AKA Professional at getting injured.

IMHO – If I need more than band-aid for minor cut, tweezers for splinter; then I was doing something really stupid, and need to leave the garage shop for small break. Serious injuries require time away from shop, and chance to slow down before return to work. That is also when the shop towels and duct/electrical tape come in handy for that long drive to clinic or ER.

Last time I attempted to keep working after couple minor metal burr cuts on my hand, and had run out of band-aids in garage, I CA glued 3 fingers together. Had to go inside and soak in water for 30 min to debond the adhesive. Would have saved time, If just stop working and got a band aid in the house.

If your shop is not a short walk to your home medicine cabinet; then you probably need a full OHSA/ANSI med kit, an emergency panic button wired to a light/siren on roof to alert the neighbors, and maybe even a defibrillator on hand.

I keep a full OHSA compliant non-expired med-kit in my truck for when I am hurt away from home too.
IME – the cost of replenishing an expired kit is triple the cost of buying new online. Just be sure to buy from reputable seller, and that you are getting a fresh kit.

Be safe, not sorry!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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sansoo22

625 posts in 295 days


#13 posted 01-23-2020 07:21 AM



If your shop is not a short walk to your home medicine cabinet; then you probably need a full OHSA/ANSI med kit, an emergency panic button wired to a light/siren on roof to alert the neighbors, and maybe even a defibrillator on hand.

- CaptainKlutz

My shop is in the garage but the house first aid kit is in the hall bathroom. Planer shavings and other types of dust from shop are not allowed in the house per the boss lady’s rules. Thus OSHA kit is now in the shop because I have to pretend its not part of the house.

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ibewjon

1254 posts in 3434 days


#14 posted 01-23-2020 12:46 PM

Along with the purchased first aid kit, I have an eye wash kit hanging in the wall, and don’t forget the tetnus shot. (Every ten years I believe.)

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

852 posts in 1229 days


#15 posted 01-23-2020 01:01 PM

Don’t use tweezers for removing slivers / cactus spines. Simply slather the area with carpenter’s yellow glue and let dry. The glue will adhere to the sliver and when you peel the glue off it’ll take the sliver with it.

The uline kit was just one example. They have big industrial ANSI approved ones too.

M

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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