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Delta 36-600 in the year 2020 - keep or move on?

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Forum topic by HardWoodLuvr posted 01-20-2020 03:36 PM 426 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HardWoodLuvr

4 posts in 28 days


01-20-2020 03:36 PM

2years ago I Craigslist bought a 36-600 with new blades (even a dado blade!) for $75 or maybe even $45 – I don’t remember. Guy was moving to Colorado so was pretty much liquidating everything bulky he owned. I turned the saw on before giving him the cash, broke it down, brought it home and it’s sat in my dining room under a moving blanket since.

This tax season I’ll finally be ready to use it (I’ll be partitioning off the living area of my house into some rooms) BUT after looking at forums / youtube concerning fence upgrades or building a small roll-around wood working table for my saw I see that most people generally say, “try to get yourself a contractor version” when answering other peoples questions about buying a legacy Delta to begin with. Of course a lot of those answers are from 10+ years ago so there’s no telling if table saws this decade have improved to where there’s no sense buying a used old one anymore.

I know the custom output shaft motor is the achilles heel of this unit (when the motors die) and I JUST read the adjustment wheels are no longer available either.

So my 2020 question is, should I bother moving forward with this tried and true 36-600 or just move on before sinking any money into it for the contractor version (or a different used saw mfg) OR just buy something new?

I don’t have a woodshop or even a garage nor will I ever build myself out a woodworking shop so I definitely don’t need a massive cabinet saw. However I would like enough precision where if I had to make a table or set of drawers, I could.

Thanks!


4 replies so far

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MrUnix

7673 posts in 2829 days


#1 posted 01-20-2020 05:11 PM

That saw does not have your typical direct drive universal screamer motor like the plastic portable saws have… it is a real induction motor and couples to the blade arbor via a belt. Properly maintained, it should last a lifetime or more. I would still consider your saw on par with a true ‘contractor’ type, but with the added advantage that you save on floor space by not having the motor hanging out the back.

Parts. Regardless of what saw you wind up with, if it is a used machine, then parts will be sketchy. But fortunately, most stuff on those machines are off the shelf stuff that can usually be sourced at your local hardware store. In the case of handwheels, you can find suitable replacements at places like Graingers, McMaster Carr, Amazon, Tractor Supply, etc..

My vote is put it to use and make sawdust. It’s a nice machine and should serve you well.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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knotscott

8365 posts in 4006 days


#2 posted 01-20-2020 06:04 PM

As long as you have it, I’d give it a go, but would not bother with the expense of adding a fence to it. (This was actually my first saw.) Install a sharp TK blade and check the alignment….I think adjusting the trunnions is difficult or maybe not even possible with these, but you can tweak the fence alignment a bit to get it parallel with the blade.

It’s smaller than a full size contractor saw, but does have a cast iron top that’s 20” deep x 38” wide with the wings, and weighs in at about 150#. It’s heavy enough and strong enough to make most cuts. You may find it works out fine. If not, you should have no trouble getting your investment back, and then you can look for a full size saw if you think you’ll be using it a lot in the future.

Brad – I think you’ll find that these did have a universal motor, but is driven with a vacuum style cog belt. It’s a cousin of the 34-670 and precursor to the TS300 compact saws. There was a TS350 version that had a direct drive induction motor.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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HardWoodLuvr

4 posts in 28 days


#3 posted 01-21-2020 02:03 AM



As long as you have it, I d give it a go, but would not bother with the expense of adding a fence to it. (This was actually my first saw.) Install a sharp TK blade and check the alignment….I think adjusting the trunnions is difficult or maybe not even possible with these, but you can tweak the fence alignment a bit to get it parallel with the blade.

Thanks for the tip! When you used your Delta, did you use the riving knife attachment + guard or just remove it? Mine is actually missing and because I want to build an outfeed table as part of my table saw cart, I’m not sure I want to bother messing with it. Also, do you have to MANUALLY rotate the knife when making an angled cut???

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knotscott

8365 posts in 4006 days


#4 posted 01-22-2020 03:52 PM

It’s a splitter, not a riving knife. I added a home made splitter fixed to a ZCI

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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