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Forum topic by Jayf32490 posted 01-18-2020 03:00 PM 377 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jayf32490

3 posts in 36 days


01-18-2020 03:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip question

I purchased a chuck for my radio arm star but I cannot seem to figure out how to attach the Chuck as the opposite my saw blade the arbor is a female machined threaded input


11 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5981 posts in 3130 days


#1 posted 01-18-2020 04:25 PM

deleted

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1220 posts in 2198 days


#2 posted 01-18-2020 04:51 PM

Sounds like you should have purchase a male threaded chuck.

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pottz

7947 posts in 1621 days


#3 posted 01-19-2020 04:38 AM

my first question is why do you need a chuck for a ras? it’s a cross cut saw not a drill press.this is an example of a tool being used for something it wasn’t intended.my advise is forget it!

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4660 posts in 2024 days


#4 posted 01-19-2020 05:37 AM

I had that same reaction Pottz when I first saw this but many of the old RAS came with a chuck that could be used for horizontal drilling where you lay the piece being drill on the table and slide it onto the bit.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Fred Hargis

5981 posts in 3130 days


#5 posted 01-19-2020 01:35 PM

They are also used to hold a small drum sander (and no end of Craftsman gizmos) but the motor is turning too fast for the drum, it burns badly in use.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Jayf32490's profile

Jayf32490

3 posts in 36 days


#6 posted 01-19-2020 02:59 PM

Thank you for the input guys and I didn’t say I necessarily was going to docany particular thing with the opposite arbor but as money is tight and I don’t have a drill press or a drum sander I would at least like didn’t know how to get by with these options thanks again all

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Golem

1 post in 1321 days


#7 posted 01-19-2020 03:11 PM

I used a chuck on my old 1975 Sears RAS with a series of buffing wheels to cut polyurethane off of an antique brass chandelier I bought. (Why anyone would use poly on a chandelier escapes me but that’s why it was cheap.). It worked well although in hindsight I should have built a belted system to slow down the speed of the wheel. There are other uses for the chuck including horizontal drilling, drum sanding, buffing, etc. But I would also set up a belted system to either slow it down or reverse the direction of the wheel.

View AndyJ1s's profile

AndyJ1s

155 posts in 392 days


#8 posted 01-19-2020 09:51 PM

You could chuck a spiral router bit in it, and a simple work-holding platform, for a halfway-decent horizontal mortising setup…

Andy

-- Andy - Arlington TX

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pottz

7947 posts in 1621 days


#9 posted 01-19-2020 11:58 PM

this is why the RAS got a bad rep,it was used for too many things it should not be used for.the RAS is best used for one thing,doing 90 degree cross cuts.back in the day it was marketed with the ability to do about dozen different functions,some which were down right dangerous.understand the tools true function and it’s a very safe tool.id never give mine up.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2358 posts in 4080 days


#10 posted 01-20-2020 01:23 AM

I have to take some issue with Pottz comments; which is unusual because I’m generally in agreement with him.

My first power saw was a Craftsman RAS (about 1968) which I used for cross cuts, ripping, sanding with both a disc on the blade side and drum sanding on the other side. Because I did not have a drill press I used it as a horizontal drill press to make some folding Priest style chairs and other things. It did have a rotary planer which i never used because it did scare me a little. I also used it with some shaper blades to shape trim pieces in a ripping position (with the fence and hold downs, and it works for cutting dadoes with a dado blade, cross cut or ripping.

Yes some of those were a bit on the hazardous side but as long as I was careful and used proper fences and supports it worked fine. The bigger problem was set up and then doing it again because you didn’t get all the pieces that needed that particular cut done with the first set up. I look back almost 45 years and actually admire what I accomplished with the saw….which I still have but now only use for cross cuts. The only repair has been new bearings on the motor.

-- Les B, Oregon

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pottz

7947 posts in 1621 days


#11 posted 01-20-2020 02:44 AM

oh les im hurt-lol,no i can take a different opinion.i just watched a vid by stumpy nubs on the RAS and he shows a bunch of old advertising showing what these saws could do and how stupid some of their suggestions where.he is pretty much of the same opinion,there great for cross cuts but no great at anything else.check it out.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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