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Forum topic by OgrePSU posted 01-18-2020 03:00 PM 1121 views 0 times favorited 57 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OgrePSU

17 posts in 40 days


01-18-2020 03:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question newbie

Hi all, brand new to the site and woodworking in general. I have owned my own house for 15 years, but I have not done much to it until recently. Started with a new coat of paint everywhere, and has morphed to replacing all my roofing and siding. I recently refinished my kitchen cabinets and want to start building items. I have a lot of inherited hand made items in my house from dressers, mahogany kitchen table, china cabinet etc.

So I have started watching a lot of youtube videos the past month, mainly by Steve Ramsey. I am considering paying for his beginner class, but I need tools.

I have a delta 10 inch compound miter saw, dewalt 10 inch circular saw, black and decker jigsaw, black and decker power drills/screwdrivers, and some clamps. other random tools that a homeowner picks up after 15 years as well. I also have a 15 gallon shop vac I was planning on using for dust collection.

I am cleaning everything out of my 2.5 car garage that I haven’t used since I moved in and have a ton of space to fill, but I need recommendations on what tools to fill it with. My budget is 1-2K, but I can go up to 3-4.

Tools I think I will need, table saw, router (not sure plunge or fixed), random orbital sander (don’t like the sander I have now, its square and the sheets of sandpaper just slide right out).

I know there is a lot more I am missing and I hope you can help me out


57 replies so far

View Fiver's profile

Fiver

71 posts in 43 days


#1 posted 01-18-2020 04:09 PM

Welcome! That area looks like it should clean up into a nice workshop over time.

As far as tools, what do you plan on working on/creating?

-- Matt - Colorado

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

852 posts in 188 days


#2 posted 01-18-2020 04:28 PM

Tablesaw and routers (big boy and little boy) are my workhorses.

Thats an excellent space for a shop.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: If you tell the truth, you dont have to remember anything (S. Clemens) Edit: Now where is that darn pencil/ tape measure!

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dbw

369 posts in 2277 days


#3 posted 01-18-2020 04:37 PM

You are probably going to get a ton of responses. A lot of the responses will probably contradict each other. The truth is it depends on what kind of woodworking you are planning on doing and how much you want to get into it, and how deep your pockets are. Here are my two cents. Must haves: workbench with woodworking vice(s), table saw, handheld router plunge/fixed, drill press, good quality parallel clamps, dust collector which has a 4” inlet, adapters to allow use of your shop vac with hand held tools and a random orbital sander. Nice to haves: router table with router lift and permanently mounted router motor, QUALIY jig saw, spindle sander, band saw, and chisels.

For now you can install a sanding drum in a drill press and have a makeshift spindle sander. You can use your jigsaw for a lot of things you otherwise might use a band saw for. By the way in my research there are only two brands of jigsaws which cut straight vertically: Festool and Bosch. DeWalt MAY have a model which keeps the blade from “flapping”.

-- measure 3 times, cut once

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

780 posts in 1600 days


#4 posted 01-18-2020 04:43 PM



Welcome! That area looks like it should clean up into a nice workshop over time.

As far as tools, what do you plan on working on/creating?

- Fiver


Agree….let the work decide the tools….

View OgrePSU's profile

OgrePSU

17 posts in 40 days


#5 posted 01-18-2020 05:02 PM



As far as tools, what do you plan on working on/creating?

- Fiver

Probably to start out, outdoor furniture for my front and back decks and gazebo area once I fix it up (50 foot maple tree limb fell onto the roof of it). I also need to create 2 new doors for my shed which has rotted at the bottom.

I also want to be able to do little storage projects for my 11 year old daughter, because she needs storage for all her toys. She also wants a tree house, but thats in the future.

I will probably also pick up a lathe because that just looks like fun to do pens and other stuff.

I really don’t know what I will enjoy doing most, I just like doing projects around the house and I think this will expand to that. So I want to make sure I have the basics covered and can add on as I need them.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

780 posts in 1600 days


#6 posted 01-18-2020 05:09 PM


As far as tools, what do you plan on working on/creating?

- Fiver

Probably to start out, outdoor furniture for my front and back decks and gazebo area once I fix it up (50 foot maple tree limb fell onto the roof of it). I also need to create 2 new doors for my shed which has rotted at the bottom.

I also want to be able to do little storage projects for my 11 year old daughter, because she needs storage for all her toys. She also wants a tree house, but thats in the future.

I will probably also pick up a lathe because that just looks like fun to do pens and other stuff.

I really don t know what I will enjoy doing most, I just like doing projects around the house and I think this will expand to that. So I want to make sure I have the basics covered and can add on as I need them.

- OgrePSU

As mentioned you decide your first project and create a need and want list from there….you could spend thousands and really have nothing that you need for the next project..

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

7085 posts in 2906 days


#7 posted 01-18-2020 05:34 PM

Your on the right track. My vote is for a quality table saw to begin. Don’t cut corners on it as it will be the centerpiece of all you woodworking.

View Newbie17's profile

Newbie17

37 posts in 1101 days


#8 posted 01-18-2020 06:11 PM

My vote is for a high quality combination square and an overhead air filtration system.

I use the combination square ( https://www.amazon.com/Starrett-C11H-12-4R-Combination-Square-Head/dp/B00C3J3G3E/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?keywords=starrett+combination+squares&qid=1579370145&sprefix=starret+combination+square&sr=8-1 )for everything: setting blades square to table tops (miter saw, bandsaw, table saw…), measuring and marking around the edge of a board, adjusting height of router bits and table saw blade for dados and rabbets, and lots of other stuff.

The overhead air filtration unit will save your shop, tools and lungs from dust (along with a shop vac or cyclone.) I have a Clearvue Max cyclone with ducting to all my tools and two Jet Air Filtration units (https://www.amazon.com/708620B-AFS-1000B-Filtration-Electrostatic-Pre-Filter/dp/B00004R9LO) in my 20’ x 20’ garage and the units’ filters get caked in dust quickly. I can’t imaging breathing all of that. On top of all of this, I wear a dust mask (https://www.amazon.com/GVS-SPR457-Elipse-Respirator-Medium/dp/B013SIIBFQ/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?keywords=elipse+p100&qid=1579370897&sr=8-1), full face shield and ear plugs. Safety first, second and third. If you’re sick or injured, you can’t have fun in the shop.

View OgrePSU's profile

OgrePSU

17 posts in 40 days


#9 posted 01-18-2020 06:21 PM


The overhead air filtration unit will save your shop, tools and lungs from dust (along with a shop vac or cyclone.)

So the Shopvac won’t be enough then?

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OgrePSU

17 posts in 40 days


#10 posted 01-18-2020 06:37 PM


Your on the right track. My vote is for a quality table saw to begin. Don t cut corners on it as it will be the centerpiece of all you woodworking.

- BurlyBob


Any suggestions on table saws? I do have a Makita table saw in my garage now (storing it for a friend) but I do want to get one of my own.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2364 posts in 4084 days


#11 posted 01-18-2020 07:01 PM

My first comment would be to buy quality if you think this will be a “life time” avocation. Black and Decker are not what I consider quality but are made for the occasional weekend warrior, but you can replace those items as needed. A good table saw will eat up most of your budget but it will last virtually forever. My Delta cabinet saw is 25 years old and still going strong. Make sure it is a left tilting blade. I like Delta but SawStop is very popular for its aggressive safety features. To save money shop for used power tools. There are millions of Baby boomers going into nursing homes or dying off whose spouses just want to get rid of those things.

I have always acquired most of my tools based on need or at least anticipated need for a project. This helps justify the cost to a spouse and your conscience.
If you get a lathe you will find a band saw almost a necessary support tool for pre-shaping blanks etc.

Your adventure is only beginning.

-- Les B, Oregon

View mike02719's profile

mike02719

210 posts in 4427 days


#12 posted 01-18-2020 07:08 PM

You got a lot of good advice here. Best of all was don’t try to equip your shop with tools unless you have a definite and repeated use for it. I would start with proper wiring, lighting, workbench, vice, and basic hand tools that would be used in most projects i.e. chisels, hand saws, measuring devices, etc. Also as already said, a good quality table saw. Don’t scrimp here, it will last you a lifetime. Good luck and keep us posted with your progress. By the way, is that your pogo stick?

-- Mike, Massachusetts

View OgrePSU's profile

OgrePSU

17 posts in 40 days


#13 posted 01-18-2020 07:25 PM

By the way, is that your pogo stick?
- mike02719

I would like to say yes, but no its my daughters. I am 6’5 and 40 years old, i would break me if I got on that thing

View ocean's profile

ocean

200 posts in 1474 days


#14 posted 01-18-2020 07:45 PM

Tablesaw / router / random orbit sander. I would start with that. As for a lathe a good one will sent you back $1500 +, not to mention cutting tools and other assorted parts and pieces – I would put that last on the list. Drill press would come before a lathe. An other item to point out is if your garage is open to the rest of the house attic (it looks it might be from the photo you posted)- you need to close off the garage from house to prevent wood dust collecting in the rest of the attic. You will be surprised how far the dust will drift into the rest of the house. Start with the basic tools and slowly buy more. If you have not done much wood work, you should build your skills with what you have before jumping into big floor tools. Best of luck don’t forget to tap the knowledge base here a Lumberjocks. Lots of friendly people with more knowledge than you can imagine.

-- Bob, FL Keys

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2550 posts in 2630 days


#15 posted 01-18-2020 08:58 PM


As far as tools, what do you plan on working on/creating?

- Fiver

Probably to start out, outdoor furniture for my front and back decks and gazebo area once I fix it up (50 foot maple tree limb fell onto the roof of it). I also need to create 2 new doors for my shed which has rotted at the bottom.

I also want to be able to do little storage projects for my 11 year old daughter, because she needs storage for all her toys. She also wants a tree house, but thats in the future.

I will probably also pick up a lathe because that just looks like fun to do pens and other stuff.

I really don t know what I will enjoy doing most, I just like doing projects around the house and I think this will expand to that. So I want to make sure I have the basics covered and can add on as I need them.

- OgrePSU


You already have the tools for that stuff, depending on how the toy box is built. If you want a lathe to just play with look on craigslist – stay way from tube and stamped steel bed ways. HF 34706 lathe is a great full size lathe for starting out to learn about turning and what you really want in a lathe. Had one for 6 years. Helped me figure out what I did and did not want, and though I sold it, it was low enough cost to just throw away when done with it.

As for other tools for flatwork – TS is #1, but how you want to work, type of materials, etc drives what you need. 3 routers 1) trim , 2) combination fixed/plunge handheld, 3) permanently mounted in a table. I consider hand planes indispensable but it depends on how you do things and what is acceptable to you whether you need any or many. I primarily use the instead of sandpaper the flatten surfaces, remove machining marks, and prep for finishing.

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