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Forum topic by JackDuren posted 01-15-2020 06:09 PM 369 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JackDuren

720 posts in 1566 days


01-15-2020 06:09 PM

I find it funny that many can talk about putting a finish on but really are clueless to how to maintain it on a weekly yearly bases.

Furniture,trim ,etc all Need to be cleaned and waxed.

Any home made furniture waxes ,etc ? I want to mix something up in a bottle ,spray and buff for woodwork, trim, etc.

The finishes vary from poly,lacquer, to pre-cats..

M


10 replies so far

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SMP

1596 posts in 512 days


#1 posted 01-15-2020 07:43 PM

Oil or wax? And do you care about VOCs and/or chemicals?

For oiling I like the General Finishes orange oil.

For wax that has less chemicals I really like this one I picked up at Rockler: https://www.rockler.com/christophe-pourny-clear-paste-wax-6-oz

In the past I used Minwax furniture paste wax, but I’ve gotten less tolerant to chemicals the past few years, and trying to not use so many chemicals and VOCs for various reasons, especially indoors.

Another decent one you can get at any store is the Howards Feed n Wax.

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sansoo22

472 posts in 261 days


#2 posted 01-16-2020 12:44 AM

I’ve been trying out EJ Wheaton micro-crystalline Wax and their orange oil. So far i quite like them. The wax has a high melting point so i don’t feel like im racing to get it on before it gets super hard on me like the Minwax i used to use.

The wax is a tad on the pricey side at $19 for 8oz but a little bit goes a long ways. I just started using the orange oil last week. Supposedly their orange and lemon oil can be diluted and used on hardwood floors. Haven’t tried that yet since all my hardwoods are still buried under carpet.

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Sark

243 posts in 967 days


#3 posted 01-16-2020 01:42 AM

Here’s my strong recommendation: use auto-detailing spray which you can buy at any auto store. Less expensive than speciality wood treatments. It’s also much easier to apply and use. Goes on very thin. Is waterproof and tough. Easy to wipe off, and has a lovely sheen. You can spray out and wipe down wood work about 3x faster with detailing solution than any wax that I know of. You can’t get it on too thick.

Which brands? Doesn’t really make a difference, but my favorite is NanoWax. But when the local auto parts store stopped carrying NanoWax, I just bought McGuire’s. I think NanoWax is superior (based on carnauba wax) but MeGuire’s auto-detailer is just fine. For many years, when I finished a cabinet job, or a kitchen remodel, I would leave bottle of NanoWax with my customer. They were happy, and you will be too.

(Avoid oils. They can become gummy over the years. I love wax. But wax takes a lot more work than using detailing solution. And you can’t use wax on open grain wood like oak or ash. If the wood is really dried out, sometimes a coating of wax is the cat’s meow. Then you can maintain your woodwork with detailing solution.)

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sansoo22

472 posts in 261 days


#4 posted 01-16-2020 04:18 PM

I’ve never heard of using detailing solution before. I’ve always got bottles of Mother’s around. I like to take a clay bar to my truck once a year. Mother’s recommends their detailing solution as the lubricant so i’ve always got a bottle or 4 on hand. I will have to give it a try.

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SMP

1596 posts in 512 days


#5 posted 01-16-2020 04:25 PM



I ve never heard of using detailing solution before. I ve always got bottles of Mother s around. I like to take a clay bar to my truck once a year. Mother s recommends their detailing solution as the lubricant so i ve always got a bottle or 4 on hand. I will have to give it a try.

- sansoo22

Just don’t use it if you think you may ever need/want to refinish it. Its a nightmare trying to get silicone products off, especially these new high tech silicone polymers. You most likely will end up with blotches in the finish. But yeah for clay barring, i use Maguiars quick detailer from back in the days when I used to detail cars. I’m guessing the Mothers is just as good.

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JackDuren

720 posts in 1566 days


#6 posted 01-16-2020 05:05 PM


I ve never heard of using detailing solution before. I ve always got bottles of Mother s around. I like to take a clay bar to my truck once a year. Mother s recommends their detailing solution as the lubricant so i ve always got a bottle or 4 on hand. I will have to give it a try.

- sansoo22

Just don’t use it if you think you may ever need/want to refinish it. Its a nightmare trying to get silicone products off, especially these new high tech silicone polymers. You most likely will end up with blotches in the finish. But yeah for clay barring, i use Maguiars quick detailer from back in the days when I used to detail cars. I’m guessing the Mothers is just as good.

- SMP


As far as I know Mothers doesn’t use silicone. It’s the reason i strated using it on my cars…

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SMP

1596 posts in 512 days


#7 posted 01-16-2020 10:03 PM


I ve never heard of using detailing solution before. I ve always got bottles of Mother s around. I like to take a clay bar to my truck once a year. Mother s recommends their detailing solution as the lubricant so i ve always got a bottle or 4 on hand. I will have to give it a try.

- sansoo22

Just don’t use it if you think you may ever need/want to refinish it. Its a nightmare trying to get silicone products off, especially these new high tech silicone polymers. You most likely will end up with blotches in the finish. But yeah for clay barring, i use Maguiars quick detailer from back in the days when I used to detail cars. I’m guessing the Mothers is just as good.

- SMP

As far as I know Mothers doesn t use silicone. It s the reason i strated using it on my cars…

- JackDuren

I looked up the msds and just lists isopropyl alcohol 10%. Interesting that just that and water could lube a clay bar enough. May have to mix my own to try.

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CaptainKlutz

2245 posts in 2101 days


#8 posted 01-16-2020 11:29 PM

Hmm, Ready, set, go:

- Hand rubbed shellac furniture, oil/varnish (Watco), or BLO/Danish Oil (Tried and True):
Murphy’s oil soap, or Simple Green® Naturals Floor Care if severely dirty, to clean. Staples Bowling Alley wax or Renaissance Wax for ‘spring cleaning’. Carnauba wax in both of them are most durable I have found.
http://www.hfstaples.com/staples-wax/
https://www.renaissancewaxes.com/

- Lacquer or Pre-cat Lacquer cabinets or furniture:
Murphy’s oil soap, or Simple Green® Naturals Floor Care, Pledge furniture polish to maintain. Very low maintenance, will use Staples wax for scuff/scratch repair.

- Polyurethane Furniture:
Any old cleaner, like Fantastic or Multi-surface Windex, and wax is optional.
If gloss piece gets scuffed up, Staples Wax hides the damage very well. Poly is for kid safe furniture, and you expect it to get beat up; so using wax is rarely needed in my house.

-Oiled wood, AKA butcher block cutting boards, utensils, or serving ware: Refreshed with Howards Butcher Block Conditioner (or DIY mix of Beeswax/mineral oil) All my stuff in this group is initially finished with Tried and True Original wood Finish (Beeswax/BLO blend that helps seal wood pores). Clean with dish soap and water.

Wife uses Pledge or Endust as needed between any annual clean up/wax sessions on fixed pieces.
If any wood gets really dirty, or grease covered; the Naturals Floor Care, or one of several other ‘natural’ floor cleaners are used in our house on any wood with a ‘light duty’ finish. We use everything and anything as needed to clean heavy duty polyurethane finishes.

BTW: Most of the ‘safe and natural’ cleaners are diluted blend of alcohol, glycol/glycerin based soaps, maybe some terpinolene’s (solvent commonly pulled from citrus fruit), with a dash of sodium hydroxide (lye), washing soda (sodium carbonate), and some weak ‘fruit’ acids as buffers to adjust the PH.
Undiluted these mixes will eat chrome off a steel bumper or etch steel/concrete; so be careful making your own. The only difference between natural stuff and others is the natural stuff biodegrades over time. But remember, they never tell how long it takes to return to nature!
So much joy found in chemistry. Lool

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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JackDuren

720 posts in 1566 days


#9 posted 01-17-2020 01:32 AM

I see olive oil In some mixes. Never used it..

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SMP

1596 posts in 512 days


#10 posted 01-17-2020 01:56 AM



I see olive oil In some mixes. Never used it..

- JackDuren

I think the thing is there is probably an unlimited list of what people use, because so many things work. Once when walking on the beach in Malibu, we got a bunch of tar from an oil spill on our feet and flip flops. Some people said the best thing to get it off was olive oil, some said peanut butter, and a few other “best things” that worked. That was just people at the campground. We found some olive oil at a friends campsite and used it and it worked great. I also know its been used to make soap for centuries. I could certainly see it working on furniture. Then again probably just about any non hardening oil would work at least for a little while.

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