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Router table fence on a unifence body

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Forum topic by Coleman Dodds posted 01-11-2020 08:27 AM 512 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Coleman Dodds

19 posts in 130 days


01-11-2020 08:27 AM

Topic tags/keywords: unifence router table router table fence

I installed a router to the extension table of my table saw. Now I’m trying to figure out a way to use my unifence body as a fence for my router also. I want to be able to position the fence over the bit so I want to have a gap in the fence. If possible I would also like to connect a vacuum attachment to the gap. I am think of using peachtree woodworking aftermarket fence system some how. Has anyone else done something like this? Or does anyone have any suggestions?


17 replies so far

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

716 posts in 1195 days


#1 posted 01-11-2020 01:56 PM

Install a sacrificial fence to the face of your unifence. This will allow you a split fence option. I made mine out of a 3’ length of planed 2×4 cut in half and attached with T-nuts. If your fence doesn’t have mounting slots you can make a U-shaped frame that fits over your fence. Easy peasy.

M

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View MrWolfe's profile

MrWolfe

616 posts in 730 days


#2 posted 01-11-2020 02:32 PM

Plus one on MM’s suggestion.
I am lazy tho, I just use carpet tape on my sacrificial fence.
Jon

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8453 posts in 3405 days


#3 posted 01-11-2020 04:44 PM

This is the best pic I have of mine. It is just a plywood box that clamps to the unifence. It has a hole in the top of the centre section for dust collection and a gate in the face for the bit. A zero clearance piece can easily be tacked on the face when needed.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View AndyJ1s's profile

AndyJ1s

112 posts in 362 days


#4 posted 01-11-2020 10:33 PM

You could also mill a wide T-slot into the back of a fence like shipright’s, so that it can slide onto the unifence head just like the extruded TS rip fence.

The advantage of using such an attachment to the table saw fence is that the fence will be parallel to the miter gauge slots (if you offset the heel in the rip fence). Since the router bits are round, there is no “square to the bit”.

However, if you use a separate router fence, you can leave the table saw fence set up to cut duplicate blanks if necessary, and without having to reset the router fence afterwards.

Something else to consider is having a router fence that can be used from either side of the bit (and correspondingly feeding from the front or back of the table). The unifence head will let you do that as well (even countering the heel setting on the rip fence.) I have a bench dog router table saw extension table with two sets of slots for using the router fence both ways from front or back of my unisaw.

Andy

View Coleman Dodds's profile

Coleman Dodds

19 posts in 130 days


#5 posted 01-11-2020 10:37 PM

ok thank you guys.

View Coleman Dodds's profile

Coleman Dodds

19 posts in 130 days


#6 posted 01-11-2020 10:39 PM



You could also mill a wide T-slot into the back of a fence like shipright s, so that it can slide onto the unifence head just like the extruded TS rip fence.

The advantage of using such an attachment to the table saw fence is that the fence will be parallel to the miter gauge slots (if you offset the heel in the rip fence). Since the router bits are round, there is no “square to the bit”.

However, if you use a separate router fence, you can leave the table saw fence set up to cut duplicate blanks if necessary, and without having to reset the router fence afterwards.

Something else to consider is having a router fence that can be used from either side of the bit (and correspondingly feeding from the front or back of the table). The unifence head will let you do that as well (even countering the heel setting on the rip fence.) I have a bench dog router table saw extension table with two sets of slots for using the router fence both ways from front or back of my unisaw.

Andy

- AndyJ1s

Do you by any chance have a picture of what your explaining?

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AndyJ1s

112 posts in 362 days


#7 posted 01-13-2020 04:21 AM

I do not have a picture of a router table fence mounted directly to the unifence head. However, the measurements for the wide t-slot (to engage the clamping bar on the unifence head) can be taken from the back of the existing unifence fence extrusion.

Since most people have their rip fence set up with a very slight taper away from the blade (to ovoid pinching/binding during ripping), if you want the router fence to be parallel to the miter gauge slots (which should always be parallel to the blade), then you will need to compensate the router fence for the taper setup on the unifence head.

As far as being able to work from both sides of the router bit, this has mostly to do with routing ends of long boards that need support.

Assuming your router table is at one end of your table saw (left or right of the TS blade), when routing long edges of boards, you would want to work from the nearest end of the table saw. However, if you are routing the end of a long board, it may be useful to position the router fence outboard of the router bit, and use the whole length of the table saw (and opposite extension) to support the length of the board.

Note that when you are facing the table saw from the front, if you are working to the left of the router bit, then you would feed the stock in the same direction you would when sawing. However, if you are working to the right of the bit (as seen from the front of the TS) then you would feed the stock to the bit from the back of the saw (opposite the direction when sawing).

Andy

View CyberDyneSystems's profile

CyberDyneSystems

301 posts in 2795 days


#8 posted 01-13-2020 08:46 PM

I laid my Unifence in the flat position (instead of upright) and cut a semi circle in that edge to go around bits.
In my case the Unifence was essentially “sacrificial” since we got a SawStop several years back, the Unisaw is now our dedicated router table. (or occasional Dado rip set up)

-- Without the wood, it's just working

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1498 posts in 3456 days


#9 posted 01-14-2020 01:33 PM

I just use the simple box style and use some pistol clamps to attach it to the fence,

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View AndyJ1s's profile

AndyJ1s

112 posts in 362 days


#10 posted 01-15-2020 12:59 AM

I hadn’t thought about this before, but a unifence has very little downward pressure on the fence especially toward the far end (opposite the fence head.) Therefore, using a vertical featherboard (or two) may lift the router fence if it is clamped to a unifence. You may need to clamp the far end of the unifence down to the table when using a vertical featherboard.

Andy

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

5141 posts in 1196 days


#11 posted 01-15-2020 01:25 AM


I hadn t thought about this before, but a unifence has very little downward pressure on the fence especially toward the far end (opposite the fence head.) Therefore, using a vertical featherboard (or two) may lift the router fence if it is clamped to a unifence. You may need to clamp the far end of the unifence down to the table when using a vertical featherboard.

Andy

- AndyJ1s

That’s a very good point. Also, your post earlier about the Bench Dog fence is spot on. I have the same Bench Dog extension on my Delta table saw and often position the ProFence that came with it on the other side of the bit in order to support large panels for the panel raising bit.

I do use my UniFence for those times that the ProFence won’t go far enough back, say for a dado or groove operation. For that though, the fence is just fine as-is.

As an aside, I bought the Uni-T-Fence for mine from Peachtree a couple of years back. It replaces the original fence with one with very handy t-slots and a UHMW face. The UHMW face is removable so you can mill auxiliary pieces to go in there for rabbeting, etc. The t-slots facilitate attaching jigs as well. It could also be modified to allow a split-fence setup and even accommodate fairly large diameter bits as was the original subject of this thread. The advantage would be that a solid fence would still be able to be used for TS operations.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13017 posts in 2987 days


#12 posted 01-15-2020 02:46 AM

Cool thing about the Unifence is it’s actually pretty easy to make custom fences to replace the original, no need to drill and tap holes or modify the aluminum extrusion. I was going to buy a Peachtree fence Uni-T but have read so many mixed comments, some love it, some say the build quality and quality control are poor.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

5141 posts in 1196 days


#13 posted 01-15-2020 04:38 AM


Cool thing about the Unifence is it s actually pretty easy to make custom fences to replace the original, no need to drill and tap holes or modify the aluminum extrusion. I was going to buy a Peachtree fence Uni-T but have read so many mixed comments, some love it, some say the build quality and quality control are poor.

- Woodknack

I can’t speak for the overall quality control of the Uni-T fences out there, but mine is excellent. I ordered a bag of 1/4-20 flat head screws and nuts so I can just leave them in the auxiliary fence inserts I build.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7517 posts in 3974 days


#14 posted 01-15-2020 05:30 AM

My question is why?

A fence on a saw I can understand but not, in my opinion, required on a router table. I have a router table extension on my TS but I don’t use the TS fence for a number of reasons.

  1. A router bit works tangential to the work as opposed to a TS fence required (for the majority of cuts) to be parallel to a saw blade.
  2. I don’t want a metal fence near my router bits.
  3. I found it much easier to use a custom made split fence made out of 3/4” baltic birch (with a vacuum hose connection), a pivoting clamp on one end of the split fence, and a clamp on the other. The split in the fence is adjustable to accommodates my bits and T track for downward feather boards.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View AndyJ1s's profile

AndyJ1s

112 posts in 362 days


#15 posted 01-15-2020 06:09 PM

Peachtree also offers (or at least did, the last time I looked) shorter sections of the same Uni-T-fence extrusion that are used on their Supreme Fence Kit (2x).

Andy

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