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Forum topic by AviatorDave posted 01-10-2020 02:09 AM 593 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AviatorDave

12 posts in 3146 days


01-10-2020 02:09 AM

Topic tags/keywords: finish protecting

Hey folks,

I’m not entirely sure this is the correct forum for this but here goes . . .

I’ve got a couple of desk top pieces that have a thick coating of polyurethane curing in my shop but I need to work on some other projects. My shop is heated to about 62ish degrees. Any thought on how I could protect these things from floating sawdust so I can continue working? I know they need air to continue to cure so putting them in giant plastic bags isn’t an option . . . I don’t think . . . No room in the house for them. (Plus there’s dog hair always present from the hound ;-) I suppose I could build a quick and dirty box to put them in with a filtered fan to keep positive pressure in the box to keep sawdust out . . . But again . . . Would have to cut some wood to build that . . .

What have you folks done to protect finishes while they cure so you can continue to make sawdust?

(I have a dust collector but it’s not set up yet. Still need to run 220 over to that part of the shop and plumb all the ducting, etc.)

Btw, I live in lower Michigan so the weather isn’t the greatest outside right now.

Thanks in advance!
-Dave

-- Somewhere in this piece of wood is a finished project covered in sawdust.


6 replies so far

View 4wood's profile

4wood

60 posts in 837 days


#1 posted 01-10-2020 03:20 AM

You could rent a U Haul trailer and use a small heater or a light bulb to keep it warm.

View AviatorDave's profile

AviatorDave

12 posts in 3146 days


#2 posted 01-10-2020 04:24 AM

Ya know . . . That’s actually a good idea! Not the U-Haul part but a small heater. I have some garage space but I just figured it was too cold. A quick and dirty frame build to hold a tarp and a small electric heater. 4wood, you’re brilliant! Thank you!

-- Somewhere in this piece of wood is a finished project covered in sawdust.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

6454 posts in 1457 days


#3 posted 01-10-2020 06:14 AM

If you have a heated space, you can do finishing in a quick enclosure in a basement, garage or other space using a light wooden frame and plastic sheathing you can buy in a roll. Access to the little room can be through a zippered opening like below.

https://www.amazon.com/ZipWall-ZipFast-Reusable-Barriers-ZF2/dp/B00UADEJ4A/ref=asc_df_B00UADEJ4A/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=280499001530&hvpos=1o5&hvnetw=g&hvrand=7963429457019741471&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9015635&hvtargid=pla-423129848076&psc=1

These work well, and are used by contractors all over doing work inside peoples homes.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1714 posts in 1471 days


#4 posted 01-10-2020 11:47 AM

A lamp with an incandescent bulb is enough heater to keep the chill off.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1167 posts in 1985 days


#5 posted 01-10-2020 03:02 PM

I’ve always found that letting the pieces dry over night was enough to no longer have to worry about dust getting in the wet poly. In the future, consider using water based poly. It dries much faster.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5872 posts in 3234 days


#6 posted 01-10-2020 03:22 PM

It should be dry to the touch overnight.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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