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Forum topic by Jeremymcon posted 01-08-2020 07:40 PM 641 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jeremymcon

405 posts in 1321 days


01-08-2020 07:40 PM

I just bought a house, and recently fenced in my small backyard. Because of the position of a tree I have a 4’ strip of land about 12’ long along the property line that is outside the fence, under a big maple tree. My wife doesn’t want lumber stored inside the fence, and I honestly don’t either because the yard is already very small.

I also have a lead on a stack of nice wide 4/4 and 8/4 air dried Walnut that a friend of my father wants to get rid of. My shop is tiny – 12’x16’, so I obviously can’t store it in there, and I can’t build a shed so close to the property line.

Can I store a stack of lumber in my 4’x12’ space? If so, how do I keep it dry? Just a tarp? Or should I lay some plastic corrugated roofing over it? I can’t really have much of an overhang, and the stack won’t get much sun being under a tree.

Should I buy this Walnut? Will it survive being stored in that area? He’s asking $3/bf and has more than I could fit unless I made the stack like 6’-8’ tall!


19 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

8739 posts in 2791 days


#1 posted 01-08-2020 07:53 PM

You can do it if you sticker it and cover with a tarp. I’ve seen that done in many places. Best if you can find somewhere under an overhang though.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

12323 posts in 1779 days


#2 posted 01-08-2020 08:18 PM



You can do it if you sticker it and cover with a tarp. I ve seen that done in many places. Best if you can find somewhere under an overhang though.

- jmartel


+1 Maybe a small lean-to instead of the tarp? Keeping it out of the rain and off the ground are necessities. The more airflow you can get across it, the better though.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Aj2

2698 posts in 2439 days


#3 posted 01-08-2020 09:08 PM

I think it’s a ok idea. If the wood has lots of bark beware it might attract bugs.

-- Aj

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Andre

3093 posts in 2447 days


#4 posted 01-09-2020 06:06 AM

+1 on the lean to or some sort of hard cover, tarp only over the top, wood needs to breath, just remeber that the wood will need to spend time in the shop to final dry/stabilize before use. I stored some Birch that I had milled under the over hang of the shop for 2 years standing upright with the bark to the outside. Some of it is still in the shop waiting to be used:)

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

913 posts in 552 days


#5 posted 01-09-2020 08:36 AM

A 8×8 or 10×10 metal shed would be easy to put storage shelves or lean on the wood inside… Then you still need to bring the wood inside a couple days before working with it. I myself only get the wood as I need it. You can end up with a lot of cash outlay sitting there.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1048 posts in 1191 days


#6 posted 01-09-2020 01:43 PM

I’d suggest u build a simple little storage area like folks build to store firewood.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

405 posts in 1321 days


#7 posted 01-09-2020 01:56 PM

Yea I thought about making a little shed type of thing, but I don’t know if it’ll be a permanent part of the yard…

Also to what extent do I need to protect the wood from rain? Like, if the top is covered with a few inches of overhang, the rain is still going to blow in the sides of that little shed type thing, right? So I’d need a tarp anyway?

View Robert's profile

Robert

3641 posts in 2121 days


#8 posted 01-09-2020 02:54 PM

Will it have enough air flow? You need at least a 2’ gap between fence and stack.

I recommend treating with a borate product prior to stickering.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View pottz's profile

pottz

7979 posts in 1625 days


#9 posted 01-09-2020 03:02 PM

where are you located,what are your weather conditions? at 3$ bf thats a great price but not if weather and insects ruin it.better be safe and ill come by and that off your hands :-)

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

667 posts in 2372 days


#10 posted 01-09-2020 03:08 PM

I think a 4’ x12’ area is plenty. I think for best “possible” results you will need to:

(1) get the lumber up off the ground—get/buy some cinder blocks and some 4×4’s and build a level foundation for the lumber to be stacked on.
(2) get lots of stickers—ideally, they should all be the same thickness—I think 18” between stickers is good. Make sure they all line up vertically or you may end up with wavy boards.
(3) cover the lumber—but allow it to breathe—use a tarp and maybe some corrugated roofing to make a roof on the stack that will protect it from water and snow. It’s not going to be feasible to keep it completely dry being stored outside—that’s ok.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4681 posts in 2028 days


#11 posted 01-09-2020 03:13 PM

Just be aware that you may get wood boring beetles, especially if you are near a wooded area or the moisture content is still fairly high (have you checked the MC? ). How was the stack of walnut stored up until now? If it was stored outside or even in a garage for example in a wooded area, inspect it carefully to make sure that it has not already been infested.

+1 on treating with a borate.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

405 posts in 1321 days


#12 posted 01-09-2020 04:24 PM

Borate like spray some borax in water on it? Or are there commercial products? I live in town, but have a big oak tree in the corner of the lot that’s this stack will be sitting under. I’m in Pennsylvania, so we do get a fair amount of rain and humidity. The stack had been stacked and stockers in a barn, but was moved and dry stacked in a (nice) basement workshop about 10 years ago. I think it was milled about 20 years ago.

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Jeremymcon

405 posts in 1321 days


#13 posted 01-09-2020 04:26 PM

And it’s clean! I actually used some of it in a recent project, and contacted the guy to buy more. He will sell me just a couple boards, but he says he has to clear the basement because in the next couple years he’ll be the house. Plus it’s almost 2 hours away, so I can’t just pop over there and grab another couple boards.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4681 posts in 2028 days


#14 posted 01-09-2020 06:05 PM

Boracare and Tim-bor are the 2 that I know off. I think that you can actually make your own treatments as well if you want a cheaper solution. I seem to recall someone saying you could simply use Boric acid but I have never tried it. The wood needs to be out of the rain of course to prevent the treatment from being washed off. They are relatively safe but you might want to do some research if you plan to use the wood for cutting boards or a baby crib for example.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View PBWilson1970's profile

PBWilson1970

51 posts in 34 days


#15 posted 01-24-2020 12:56 PM

Walnut is surprisingly resistant to rot as long as it’s not in direct contact with the ground. I’ve kept pieces outdoors and under an overhang for years and although it goes gray on the outside, a pass or two through the planer reveals some beautiful grain.

I’ve been lucky with the walnut I’ve had. Some bugs under the bark made for some interesting chewed up paths, but they didn’t get to the heartwood.

The Butternut I had didn’t fare so well. It was like candy to the critters.

-- I love the smell of sawdust in the morning.

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