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Stereo Console Leg Joinery

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Forum topic by kyngfish posted 01-08-2020 06:05 PM 336 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kyngfish

115 posts in 946 days


01-08-2020 06:05 PM

Hi All, I’m about 2/3rds of my way through a project for a stereo console in a reasonably modern style. Learned some lessons along the way and it isn’t perfect but I’m fairly proud of it. I spent the last few days putting together a leg taper jig and have the legs rough cut and have a few questions about it.

Basically the legs are 1” x 2” at their widest, and they taper down to around 1”x1”. They splay out ten degrees from the bottom of the console. I want to run them through the planer to bring them close to 3/4” thickness and I wanted to know:

- Can I glue up the legs to the leg supports before running them through the planer?

- What’s the best way to attach the legs to the console? The console probably weighs about 35 – 40 lbs. My tube amp weighs about 50 lbs. Add other components and etc, and we are getting close to 100-150 lbs on the 4 legs. Is gluing enough? Or should I use dowels or screws for the joinery? Mortise and tenon is pretty much out for this particular project


7 replies so far

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kyngfish

115 posts in 946 days


#1 posted 01-08-2020 06:06 PM

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PPK

1793 posts in 1666 days


#2 posted 01-08-2020 07:05 PM

Glue and dowels is a good idea to me for securing the legs to the case.

I don’t know that I entirely understand your planing question, but if you want to plane down the whole leg assembly, you’ll get a bunch of cross grain tear out…

How about run then through the table saw, and then use a hand plane to remove the blade marks? Or leave them 1” thick… That’s what I’d do. I think 1” would be more asthetically pleasing than 3/4 anyway

-- Pete

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bilyo

1163 posts in 1959 days


#3 posted 01-08-2020 07:17 PM

You definitely need something more than just glue. You are gluing end grain to end grain and it just won’t hold. Cutting 1/4 moon shaped mortices on the table saw would not be difficult and then cut loose tenons shaped to fit. If you have a router, you could also cut mortices in both pieces with that.

A pair of hardwood dowels in each joint would be a minimum and may offer adequate strength but, I think the loose tenon will offer the most glue area and the most strength.

At 3/4” thickness, I think lateral forces are going to be of equal concern. You can only fix that with thicker material or a change in design.

Another way would be to do a ship lap at the joint. A well fitted ship lap will be stronger than dowels and may resist lateral forces better as well. Again, thicker would be better.

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LesB

2610 posts in 4300 days


#4 posted 01-08-2020 10:05 PM

Another way would be to do a ship lap at the joint. A well fitted ship lap will be stronger than dowels and may resist lateral forces better as well. Again, thicker would be better.

- bilyo

I think bilyo is referring to a LAP joint where the two pieces of wood overlap each other at their joined section. This would eliminate the end grain joining. A ship lap joint commonly refers to two boards that overlap each other slightly along their length as in ship lap siding. That is OK I’m always mixing up tails and pins in dovetail joints.

If the joints are already glued and you don’t want to redo them you could try creating a spline across the joints; on the edge across the corner. Just cut a slot on the table saw and make a cross grain spline to fit. Or you could make a butterfly inlay on one of both sides.

-- Les B, Oregon

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bilyo

1163 posts in 1959 days


#5 posted 01-08-2020 10:21 PM

I think bilyo is referring to a LAP joint where the two pieces of wood overlap each other at their joined section. This would eliminate the end grain joining. A ship lap joint commonly refers to two boards that overlap each other slightly along their length as in ship lap siding. That is OK I m always mixing up tails and pins in dovetail joints.

- LesB


Thanks for the correctiion.
Good suggestion. I was under the impression that he had not yet glued them up. Thinking about it further, it appears that he has already cut the angles. So, to do a lap joint, he would have to re-cut them. Your suggestion might be the easiest/best solution. I would only add that the spline would work best if the grain is perpendicular to the angled joint.

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kyngfish

115 posts in 946 days


#6 posted 01-08-2020 10:38 PM

Thanks for all the feedback all. What I was going to do, was two hardwood dowels at the angle ( I haven’t glued them up yet). Given the weight it would be holding, I was hoping that we would be enough, essentially with 150ish lbs, you’d have around 37ish lbs at each corner give or take.

For joining the leg assembly to the case – I wasn’t sure if gluing was enough, or whether 3-4 dowels along the length that meets the case would be enough (the wood is 3/4 inch so the dowel would go in about 1/2 inch). Or if gluing the assembly to the bottom was enough with all of the weight it would hold up.

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Lazyman

5826 posts in 2244 days


#7 posted 01-08-2020 10:52 PM

If the only reason to run them through the planer is to bring them down to 3/4” thick, I wouldn’t. You want as much glue surface as you can get against the bottom of the case. If they look too bulky, I would slightly taper the part going to the ground. To attach to the bottom of the case, drill 2 or 3 countersunk holes and glue and screw the legs to the bottom. The screws will act as clamps as the glue sets and provide some mechanical reinforcement, though I am a little worried that you may not have enough thickness in the bottom of the case to hold the screws in. Perhaps threaded inserts would be stronger than wood screws? The glue surfaces need to be perfect with no gaps. Personally, I think that I would make a prototype with some scraps and stress test it.

Your miter joint will not be strong enough. A better approach would be to cut the entire leg from a single piece, though grain orientation is important. The second best approach would be a bridle joint. If it is too late for that, then a spline should make the joint strong enough. A couple of dowels to pin the spline or bridle joint for extra insurance might not be a bad idea either.

I am by no means an expert but that is what I would do.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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