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Sanding marks in finish

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Forum topic by Coleman Dodds posted 12-23-2019 02:45 AM 647 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Coleman Dodds

24 posts in 763 days


12-23-2019 02:45 AM

I am finishing a bench top with General finish arm r seal. I used 400 grit sandpaper to buff the coat. When I applied the next coat you can see the sanding marks in the finish when you shine light on it. Is this normal. I have never noticed this before. It is definitely in the finish not in the wood.


10 replies so far

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Rich

7446 posts in 1829 days


#1 posted 12-23-2019 04:22 AM

That could be any number of things. Without seeing it, I can’t say for sure. The Arm-R-Seal should have a high enough content of solids to fill scratch marks from 400 grit paper. Is it possible there was something coarser caught in the paper that scratched it?

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Coleman Dodds

24 posts in 763 days


#2 posted 12-23-2019 05:14 AM



That could be any number of things. Without seeing it, I can t say for sure. The Arm-R-Seal should have a high enough content of solids to fill scratch marks from 400 grit paper. Is it possible there was something coarser caught in the paper that scratched it?

No the paper was brand new. Could it be that the arm r seal is pretty old and when I opened it the top was solidified but there was liquid under the solid layer?

- Rich


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Rich

7446 posts in 1829 days


#3 posted 12-23-2019 05:26 AM


That could be any number of things. Without seeing it, I can t say for sure. The Arm-R-Seal should have a high enough content of solids to fill scratch marks from 400 grit paper. Is it possible there was something coarser caught in the paper that scratched it?

- Rich

No the paper was brand new. Could it be that the arm r seal is pretty old and when I opened it the top was solidified but there was liquid under the solid layer?

- Coleman Dodds

I can’t say for sure that that was the cause, but it’s bad practice to use finish that’s in that bad of shape. Get some fresh Arm-R-Seal and try again. Also, for oil based finishes, Bloxygen is a good product to prevent the sort of oxidation that damaged your can of finish.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Coleman Dodds

24 posts in 763 days


#4 posted 12-23-2019 05:30 AM


That could be any number of things. Without seeing it, I can t say for sure. The Arm-R-Seal should have a high enough content of solids to fill scratch marks from 400 grit paper. Is it possible there was something coarser caught in the paper that

scratched it?

- Rich

No the paper was brand new. Could it be that the arm r seal is pretty old and when I opened it the top was solidified but there was liquid under the solid layer?

- Coleman Dodds

I can t say for sure that that was the cause, but it s bad practice to use finish that s in that bad of shape. Get some fresh Arm-R-Seal and try again. Also, for oil based finishes, Bloxygen is a good product to prevent the sort of oxidation that damaged your can of Arm-R-Seal.

- Rich

Can you think of any way I can fix it before Christmas morning ? Lol.

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Rich

7446 posts in 1829 days


#5 posted 12-23-2019 05:39 AM


Can you think of any way I can fix it before Christmas morning ? Lol.

- Coleman Dodds

I feel your pain. You have time to get a fresh coat on there if you can obtain the finish.

But really, how bad is it? You have some scratches. So what? Unless it’s really bad, go ahead and give it and don’t say a word about the scratches. We woodworkers know every flaw in what we build, but most people will never notice them. One of the most difficult things to learn as a craftsman is to never point out the flaws in one of your pieces.

If someone has complimented your work, and you point out a flaw, you’re essentially telling them they don’t know what they are talking about. Don’t do it. Just smile and say thank you.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Coleman Dodds

24 posts in 763 days


#6 posted 12-23-2019 05:49 AM

I feel your pain. You have time to get a fresh coat on there if you can obtain the finish.

But really, how bad is it? You have some scratches. So what? Unless it s really bad, go ahead and give it and don t say a word about the scratches. We woodworkers know every flaw in what we build, but most people will never notice them. One of the most difficult things to learn as a craftsman is to never point out the flaws in one of your pieces.

- Rich

I was thinking that. I’m staring at it for hours and no one else will ever look at it as I have. Thank you for your help.

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Rich

7446 posts in 1829 days


#7 posted 12-23-2019 05:55 AM


I was thinking that. I’m staring at it for hours and no one else will ever look at it as I have. Thank you for your help.

- Coleman Dodds

It’ll be awesome. Glad to help.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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SMP

4816 posts in 1145 days


#8 posted 12-23-2019 06:36 AM

My guess is that you are using the satin ArS? If so my guess is the flattening agents. They settle to the bottom, the top solidifies, when you use the stuff in the bottom it is now more concentrated with flattening agents that settles and those can cause streaking. But as mentioned, you are probably the only one that notices. What has been seen can’t be unseen. I have a lot of telltale heart things on various furniture i’ve made around the house as well as home improvements, like crown molding etc. People will say how good something looks and I only see the flaw staring back at me.

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woodbutcherbynight

10386 posts in 3648 days


#9 posted 12-24-2019 05:23 AM


We woodworkers know every flaw in what we build, but most people will never notice them. One of the most difficult things to learn as a craftsman is to never point out the flaws in one of your pieces.

If someone has complimented your work, and you point out a flaw, you re essentially telling them they don t know what they are talking about. Don t do it. Just smile and say thank you.

- Rich

I am recalling the adage, we are our own worst critics.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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avsmusic1

682 posts in 1925 days


#10 posted 12-24-2019 11:18 AM

Sounds like it’s done to me ;)

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