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Forum topic by Karda posted 12-22-2019 04:27 AM 891 views 1 time favorited 44 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

2046 posts in 1190 days


12-22-2019 04:27 AM

Hi, Jerry sent me a piece of mesquite 5.5×4.5×5.5 high. All i can see in this is a bowl narrow at the base tapering up to a wide mouth, no very original. Can you guys give me some ideas, simple ideas. I am more accustom to side grain work. I also have a piece of palo verde thew same size, that is limited though the grain coloring is all on one side.


44 replies so far

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Nubsnstubs

1673 posts in 2367 days


#1 posted 12-22-2019 02:10 PM

Mike, put the live center 2 3/4” down from the top on the pith end, or on the bark side. The last picture is the pith side. Picture the center of it, and make that your bottom. Make a footed bowl with the foot about 1 1/2”+ tall. That will leave the bowl about 3” deep when done. If you were to make the bark side the foot, you could gain about a 1/2” larger diameter. This Mesquite piece is a purfeck example of choosing how to mount a piece for maximum effect. tenon on the pith side will give you tighter grain in the bottom. tenon on the bark side will give you a wider grain pattern.

Mount the Palo Verde making sure the dark side is the bottom. That way, you keep the color.

Below is a picture of a large Palo Verde footed bowl. It’s not warped. The picture angle makes it look that way. This is only shown to give you an idea of how to minimize the depth of a bowl by putting a foot on one. Upon closer examination of the picture, I also see 2 dowels in the bowl. One across the bottom left above the foot, and one on the rim between the thinner vertical line and the dark blob. The particular dowel is a Palo Verde dowel I made. It has a dark spot in it which gives it some character.

........... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Jack Lewis

576 posts in 1715 days


#2 posted 12-22-2019 02:52 PM

If you follow some of the turning artist here and on facebook you will discover finding the article’s unique shape in the chunk of blank is the most satisfying part of turning. Take the time to temporarily mount the blank in several configurations, step back and see the object’s shape hidden deep inside with each mount. See how the grain will enhance or distract from the shape you visualize. Plan your remounting procedures ahead of time so you can allow for them. Leave space in your concept for the inevitable design change. Turn to satisfy YOU!

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

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Phil32

932 posts in 540 days


#3 posted 12-22-2019 09:08 PM

If the wood has some lovely grain figure, keep the shape simple. If the wood is plain, make the shape lovely. Don’t make the figure compete with form.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Karda

2046 posts in 1190 days


#4 posted 12-22-2019 09:27 PM

thanks for your insight. I am learning how to take grain and form into consideration, not usually what I do. I just put the pieces between centers and go to work and what I get is what I get. What do i need to know to turn a tall foot That is not something I have ever done. I always get catches when i try to turn a foot

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Phil32

932 posts in 540 days


#5 posted 12-23-2019 01:31 AM

Go slow. Maybe switch to a skew lathe tool.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Karda

2046 posts in 1190 days


#6 posted 12-23-2019 02:06 AM

i’d never use a skew in that tight an area, I’m not that good

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Phil32

932 posts in 540 days


#7 posted 12-23-2019 04:14 AM

Don’t use the point of the skew, use the heel.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Karda

2046 posts in 1190 days


#8 posted 12-23-2019 04:29 AM

I didn’t think you could use a skew on a bowl

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1673 posts in 2367 days


#9 posted 12-23-2019 01:11 PM

I tried using a skew on a large bowl. Instant fail. I tried using on a small bowl. Another instant fail. Now, if you lay the skew down on it’s side and use it as a scraper, you’re good to go. You will be limited on inside curves.

Mike, my approach to doing tall feet, on pedestal bowls pictured above is to cut from the bowl bottom toward the center line of the pedestal.. Then another cut from the bottom of the foot to the center line of the pedestal. I start by rubbing the heel twisting the gouge until it starts cutting. I’m rubbing the heel of the bowl gouge on both cuts. When you start getting close to that center line, you’ve got to ease up on the angle of the opposite wing because when you cross over that line and hit the opposite side, you will get a catch. You have to do some wrist action during the cut to keep from catching. I keep doing that until I have the desired shape. Sometimes I’ll use a round carbide to get my shape, then clean it up with a bowl gouge….... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4660 posts in 2024 days


#10 posted 12-23-2019 02:14 PM

As skew should only be used in spindle turning (where the end grain is mounted on the the drive and live centers). The only time I have deviated from that is as a negative rake scraper and never on the inside of a bowl.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Phil32

932 posts in 540 days


#11 posted 12-23-2019 04:20 PM

The discussion was about using a skew to shape the foot portion of a footed bowl.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Karda

2046 posts in 1190 days


#12 posted 12-23-2019 05:08 PM

I’ll keep the skew for spindle work except as a neg rake, I have done that. Jerry has a good idea, a round carbide

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Karda

2046 posts in 1190 days


#13 posted 01-06-2020 11:38 PM

i have the above piece mounted on a face plate. I started to round and lost a piece out off the upper edge. Now i am considering moving the face plate to the other side, but that would give me 4 .5” holes in the bottom.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4660 posts in 2024 days


#14 posted 01-07-2020 02:14 AM

How much diameter will you lose if you just keep it where it is?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Karda

2046 posts in 1190 days


#15 posted 01-07-2020 04:09 AM

I went ahead and rounded it, the chip is almost gone. I am not going to turn it around.

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