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Forum topic by Alex posted 12-17-2019 07:29 PM 571 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Alex

18 posts in 1894 days


12-17-2019 07:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: chainsaw mill milling poplar

Hello,
I had a 18” poplar tree felled that I decided to mill up with my chainsaw mill. Im glad I did because Ill net about 200 BF for the cost of gas, oil, and time. I did this over a 3 day period (2 weekends). On the first two days I would periodically sharpen the chain, basically as I thought needed with a few light passes of a file. Before the third day, I did a more thorough file and leveled off the depth gauge using an Oregon guide. After that, I noticed that my cuts were really rough; lots of deep cuts that will translate in to lost thickness when I go to flatten and smooth the board. I’m guessing the issue is from one of two things; 1. the chain was much looser than when I started and therefore starting to move off the ideal cutting path. 2. I did not sharpen the chain evenly, causing the variations. After cutting a couple of boards, I took the mill off and I tightened the chain and the issue seemed to improve some. Not as good as my first two days cuts. Was something else leading to the roughness? Just looking to get a little better in my process to have better yields in the future.
For anyone interested, I am using a Husqvarna 395xp, 36in bar and standard 30* chain.
Thanks,
Alex

-- Alex - Check me out on instagram @akpingel


7 replies so far

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1315 posts in 912 days


#1 posted 12-17-2019 07:45 PM

Your chain may have encountered something that bent a tooth – or you did all the filing in one direction.
I’m surprised your investment in the 200 BF of poplar didn’t include the depreciation cost of the chainsaw mill.

-- Phil Allin - There are woodworkers and people who collect woodworking tools. The woodworkers have a chair to sit on that they made.

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HokieKen

16653 posts in 2147 days


#2 posted 12-17-2019 07:47 PM

If you filed off your depth gauge, you increased the amount of “bite” each tooth takes. Personally, I’ll lightly hit the teeth with a round file when I notice the saw starting to cut slower. Aside from that, if it’s cutting well, I don’t fix what ain’t broke ;-) Also, the gauge you used to set the depth stop most likely assumes that you’re using it for cross-cutting. I don’t know for certain but I think that chains set up for rip cutting like with a mill work better with a lighter depth of cut.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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MrUnix

8411 posts in 3207 days


#3 posted 12-17-2019 07:49 PM

[...] Before the third day, I did a more thorough file and leveled off the depth gauge using an Oregon guide. After that, I noticed that my cuts were really rough; lots of deep cuts that will translate in to lost thickness when I go to flatten and smooth the board.
- Alex

If the chain is now taking too much of a bite, my guess is that you filed too much off the depth gauges… maybe the guide you had was not the appropriate one for the chain you are using?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Alex

18 posts in 1894 days


#4 posted 12-17-2019 07:59 PM

All great feedback. I was using an off the shelf depth guide (.025”?) for a standard cut so it would make sense I filed too much off. I will keep this in mind as I set up for the next opportunity. Still new to the mill, so I am still learning.

-- Alex - Check me out on instagram @akpingel

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HokieKen

16653 posts in 2147 days


#5 posted 12-17-2019 08:04 PM

I would also advise reducing the chisel angle of the teeth as well for milling. Chains are typically set up for cross cutting since that’s what chainsaws are typically used for. But a ripping chain will have very little angle to the teeth. I wouldn’t try to change it all at once. Just start filing at a shallower angle each time you sharpen and eventually you’ll end up with a square tooth. Or maybe leave a few degrees.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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tomsteve

1145 posts in 2227 days


#6 posted 01-03-2021 05:46 PM

filing the depth gage too much can add wear and tear on the clutch.

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tomsteve

1145 posts in 2227 days


#7 posted 01-03-2021 05:51 PM



If you have a woodworking shop and you are looking for best chainsaw for mill then you should check bestofchainsaw.

- mark21

kind of strange this page has a pic of a stihl but no mention of stihl for best climbing chainsaw.
https://bestofchainsaw.com/9-best-climbing-chainsaw/

not only that,starting out with:
If you have to climb the tree *or use a ladder to cut high limbs and branches. *
seems rather not good to be giving unsafe practices like using a ladder and a chainsaw.

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