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Forum topic by mike02719 posted 12-15-2019 02:03 PM 356 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mike02719

196 posts in 4395 days


12-15-2019 02:03 PM

I need advice from some old time wood turners. My bowls and decorative turnings have been finished with a wipe of mineral spirits, two or three coats of Homer Formbys tung oil, and a few coats of MinWax finishing wax. I am satisfied with the shine, but I think the grain could use more “pop”. The wax and tung oil came from my local hardware store, but if something is more available that was better, I would like to know. I would have posted in finishing forum, but I wanted to hear from turners.

-- Mike, Massachusetts


5 replies so far

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LesB

2318 posts in 4053 days


#1 posted 12-15-2019 06:34 PM

I have had good luck with processed (heat treated) Walnut oil (Mahoney’s specifically). It goes on easily and seems to cure faster than straight tung oil. It darkens similar to other oils but does not add any of it’s own color. I would wait for it to cure for 24 to 48 hours before waxing.

Mylands friction fihish works well for “decorative” items but I would not use it on utility items (like bowls) and might get a some wear.

For what I will call utility items like bowls, platters and etc. I prefer to put on a top coat (3 or 4) of salad bowl finish, General’s or Behlen’s. It forms a very durable finish.

News flash. While writing this response I double checked on General’s finishes and discovered their “salad bowl finish” is now just called a Bowl finish and they have another product called a “water base” finish that is a hybridized product that drys faster. It appears to be similar to the Bowl finish but it as fewer solids by volume (meaning to me a slower build up) and the hardness rating of the finish is lower; 140 compared to 200 on a Konig scale…..what ever that is. Actually I prefer Behlens which builds the finish even faster because it has a higher viscosity. It is harder to find in stores.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Andre

3017 posts in 2416 days


#2 posted 12-15-2019 06:50 PM

while not an Old Timer, I use Hoyt hard wax finish on almost all my pens and some small bowls, easy and fast with a nice tough shinny finish. Similar product is the carnauba wax from Lee Valley.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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timmib

13 posts in 1374 days


#3 posted 12-15-2019 07:59 PM


I need advice from some old time wood turners. My bowls and decorative turnings have been finished with a wipe of mineral spirits, two or three coats of Homer Formbys tung oil, and a few coats of MinWax finishing wax. I am satisfied with the shine, but I think the grain could use more “pop”. The wax and tung oil came from my local hardware store, but if something is more available that was better, I would like to know. I would have posted in finishing forum, but I wanted to hear from turners.

- mike02719

Why couldn’t you use an oil wood stain to enhance the grain? It would be the first coat and ‘covered’ by other oil-based layers. I’ve used Minwax for this purpose for years, but not for turnings. Don’t know why it might be an option, though.

-- Kim, Chillicothe, MO

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Phil32

855 posts in 513 days


#4 posted 12-15-2019 08:29 PM

The success and appearance of most finishes depends on surface preparation. When sanding your woodturnings have you gone to a sufficiently fine grit to make the wood grain “pop?”

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Wildwood

2794 posts in 2744 days


#5 posted 12-16-2019 06:00 PM

Any film finish will pop the figure/grain in wood without oil! (lacquer, poly, shellac, varnish) Only difference is solvent thinner used with those materials. Water based/borne will also do the same without addition of oil.

Think need to understand what Formby’s Tung Oil is, just what’s known as a wiping varnish. The optimum wiping varnish nothing more than 50/50 mix of mineral spirits or other solvent/thinner and varnish or poly. Two coats of this 50/50 mix should equal one coat of film finish varnish or poly.

Formby’s Tung Oil composed of 60% thinner, some dryers and no mention of Tung Oil so product may or may not contain Tung Oil. So maybe 40% of the product some kind of chemical resin and other 60% thinner/solvent & dryers.

https://www.msdsdigital.com/formbys®-rung-oil-finish-msds

Common solvent/thinner used in wood finishes: mineral spirits, (paint thinner) naphtha, toluene, xylem, & turpentine substitutes. Lacquers require lacquer thinner, and Shellac requires denatured alcohol.

You can make your own wiping varnish using film finishes and solvent thinner 50/50 mix. If buying a commercial products check the label to make sure does contain more than 60% solvent/thinner. You have to be a chemist to understand section 2 or section 3 in MSDS or SDS so easier to read product labels. Only hazardous chemicals are listed Manufacturers don’t list everything in their products nor required too.

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/techniques/finishing/oil-finishes-their-history-and-use/

Could not find a place that sells and MSDS or SDS for Hoyt Hard Wax Finish. Suspect hard oil wax finishes some kind of new marketing ploy slowly becoming popular.

-- Bill

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