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3/4 HP DC, 4" PVC pipes - DC in line with the pipe? Pipe on the floor or on the wall?

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Forum topic by MiniMe posted 12-14-2019 04:40 PM 1286 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MiniMe

335 posts in 660 days


12-14-2019 04:40 PM

Hi guys

Finally, now I have the components to build my DC system and I am trying to find out what is the best position for each of these components
Since I need to get this off the ground ASAP the plan is to run a PVC pipe as below connect it straight to the DC
Then I want cut the pipe n the middle and install a Y with a 4to4 and a 4”to2” connector to which I am going to connect the 2” and respectively 4” clear PVC hose that I bought. These will be around 6” long to allow me to reach any tool from that central point
Installng blast gates and running a hose to each tool might happen later or never, depending on the needs, performance and volume of work/dust :-)

What are the best position for the horizontal pipe and the DC for optimum performace: on the floor or above the table top level ? Also when and if I implement a two stage system should I put the separator on the floor or raise it as close as possilble, almost in line with the DC and the pipe?

I will vent out to a bag or later using a flexible hose through the door (it is in poor shape and made of wood -I can ruin it with experiments :-))

thanks for the feedback


9 replies so far

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TungOil

1372 posts in 1103 days


#1 posted 12-14-2019 05:05 PM

Well, the best position from an airflow perspective is going to be the one that gives you the shortest ‘equivalent pipe’ length. Since each el is usually equivalent to about 3’ of straight pipe, for your system eliminating as many el’s as possible will be beneficial. So probably wall mounted based on your sketch, and if you can mount the DC in line with the 4” main you might get away with just a straight 4” duct which would be ideal. Wall mount has the added benefit of getting the pipe off the floor, making it much easier to clean around.

I’d also suggest adding a blast gate to each branch on your Y. This way you will maximize airflow to the branch in use by closing the one not in use.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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MiniMe

335 posts in 660 days


#2 posted 12-15-2019 06:05 AM



Well, the best position from an airflow perspective is going to be the one that gives you the shortest ‘equivalent pipe’ length. Since each el is usually equivalent to about 3’ of straight pipe, for your system eliminating as many el’s as possible will be beneficial. So probably wall mounted based on your sketch, and if you can mount the DC in line with the 4” main you might get away with just a straight 4” duct which would be ideal. Wall mount has the added benefit of getting the pipe off the floor, making it much easier to clean around.

I’d also suggest adding a blast gate to each branch on your Y. This way you will maximize airflow to the branch in use by closing the one not in use.

- TungOil

so you are saying DC garabge bin and the pipe should be aligned horizontally at the same level ?

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TungOil

1372 posts in 1103 days


#3 posted 12-15-2019 01:33 PM

Yes, reducing the numbers of turns you make the air go through on the way to the fan will decrease the pressure drop in your system. Ideally you would have a straight shot from the point of use to the DC, which you can actually get very close to achieving with your layout.

Practically, for layout purposes most shops will have numerous el’s incorporated into the DC ductwork. All these turns add to the pressure drop across the system. There’s nothing wrong with that as long as the DC ductwork is laid out and the pressure drop calcs are done, then a DC with suitable flow and pressure is selected.

What you have shown is very simple and short so you have little to worry about. The blast gates will be your friend.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1182 posts in 3402 days


#4 posted 12-15-2019 03:31 PM

If you have a 3 1/2 HP DC, I think 4” pipe is too small. See wood magazine, issue 245. March 2017. And steel duct is easier because fittings are adjustable.

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MiniMe

335 posts in 660 days


#5 posted 12-15-2019 03:58 PM


If you have a 3 1/2 HP DC, I think 4” pipe is too small. See wood magazine, issue 245. March 2017. And steel duct is easier because fittings are adjustable.

- ibewjon


it is 3/4HP 590CFM see the picture (there is a note in the picture, zoom in)
the intake is 4” so I guess the manufacturer did some maths before they put that there :-)
I think as long as the line is not too long I will be fine. For a 20’ straight + some hose (up to 10’) I should be fine shouldn’t I?

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ibewjon

1182 posts in 3402 days


#6 posted 12-15-2019 06:55 PM

Title says 3.5 HP. I didn’t zoom into tiny print. That is a vacuum cleaner. Any amount of flex hose really cuts the results.

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MiniMe

335 posts in 660 days


#7 posted 12-15-2019 10:10 PM


Title says 3.5 HP. I didn t zoom into tiny print. That is a vacuum cleaner. Any amount of flex hose really cuts the results.

- ibewjon


Neah the vacuum does not have the CFM….my vacuum has 5HP :-)) so not even by that norm (HP) it is not vacuum

Sorry for the ttitle I fixed the typo

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5929 posts in 3102 days


#8 posted 12-16-2019 11:56 AM

You don’t really believe that vacuum has 5 HP do you?

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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MiniMe

335 posts in 660 days


#9 posted 12-16-2019 03:10 PM



You don t really believe that vacuum has 5 HP do you?

- Fred Hargis


I don’t, hence my ”:-))” in the reply

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