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End grain cutting board thickness

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Forum topic by mdzehr posted 12-12-2019 12:19 PM 507 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mdzehr

380 posts in 976 days


12-12-2019 12:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cutting boards

I wasn’t sure where to post this forum topic so I put it in the joinery section.

I don’t have much (actually no) experience with making cutting boards and need your collective wisdom.

A friend asked me to make a new (replacement) under counter pullout cutting board for him. The dimensions are 18×24 and I would like to make it end grain maple and some cherry from a tree from his backyard. The only problem is that it has to be 3/4 inch thick because it slides into a slot under his counter.

I’m concerned that over time this end grain cutting board will sag due to the size of the board with no support underneath it.

I was thinking about adding the cherry as the long grain boards on each side, with one in the middle, one at each end as breadboard ends for additional structural integrity plus I think it could look cool. My concerns about doing this are this:

Endgrain and long grain woods move (expand and contact) differently over time and I’m concerned that this could lead to subtle surface thickness variations at best and possibly structural failure in a worst case scenario.

Your thoughts?

-- Mike, Lancaster PA


19 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2135 posts in 771 days


#1 posted 12-12-2019 12:31 PM

I’m concerned that over time this end grain cutting board will sag
due to the size of the board with no support underneath it.
- mdzehr

sag ? this “could” only happen if you are putting feet on each corner.
cutting boards that size would be meant to lay flat on a surface,
and “usually” stored on end vertically in a cabinet.
they do not “sag”, per se.
now, you may be thinking of “cupping” ?
the condition of the wood you use will determine any future defects
or other issues you may experience over time.
oiling, washing and storing will also play a role in any futures issues.

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View mdzehr's profile

mdzehr

380 posts in 976 days


#2 posted 12-12-2019 12:35 PM

Thanks John but this will be a under countertop pullout cutting board with nothing to support it when it is being used.

I’m concerned that over time this end grain cutting board will sag due to the size
of the board with no support underneath it.
- mdzehr

sag this will only happen if you are putting feet on each corner.
cutting boards that size would be meant to lay flat on a surface,
and “usually” stored on end vertically in a cabinet.
they do not “sag”, per se.
now, you may be thinking of “cupping”

the condition of the wood you use will determine any future defects or other issues
you may experience over time.
oiling, washing and storing will also play a role in any futures issues.

.

.

- John Smith


-- Mike, Lancaster PA

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2135 posts in 771 days


#3 posted 12-12-2019 12:41 PM

ah so – will it be pulled out of storage and put on the counter top ?
a little more info needed for accurate feedback.

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

2133 posts in 2016 days


#4 posted 12-12-2019 12:45 PM

I wouldn’t want an end grain board under 1-1/2”, 2” ideally.
Friends asking for things that don’t make much sense is a risk, and to preserve friendship I suggest explaining that it may not last and you probably won’t be able to fix it if it doesn’t stay flat but you’ll still build it if that’s what he wants.
Good luck, keep us posted

View mdzehr's profile

mdzehr

380 posts in 976 days


#5 posted 12-12-2019 12:47 PM

Sorry John, but I’m new to this forum posting and I didn’t give adequate info. It will be pulled out from its slot under the counter and used in the extended position unsupported for cutting

-- Mike, Lancaster PA

View mdzehr's profile

mdzehr

380 posts in 976 days


#6 posted 12-12-2019 12:48 PM

Thanks Grant. That was my assumption as well.


I wouldn t want an end grain board under 1-1/2”, 2” ideally.
Friends asking for things that don t make much sense is a risk, and to preserve friendship I suggest explaining that it may not last and you probably won t be able to fix it if it doesn t stay flat but you ll still build it if that s what he wants.
Good luck, keep us posted

- GrantA


-- Mike, Lancaster PA

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6826 posts in 1321 days


#7 posted 12-12-2019 01:08 PM



I wouldn t want an end grain board under 1-1/2”, 2” ideally.
Friends asking for things that don t make much sense is a risk, and to preserve friendship I suggest explaining that it may not last and you probably won t be able to fix it if it doesn t stay flat but you ll still build it if that s what he wants.
Good luck, keep us posted

- GrantA


+1 from me as well :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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whitedogone

37 posts in 2751 days


#8 posted 12-12-2019 01:27 PM

How about glueing thinner pieces of end grain to plywood backer.

View BrianHurstWW's profile

BrianHurstWW

46 posts in 450 days


#9 posted 12-12-2019 01:41 PM

Mike,
Add me to the group that thinks 3/4” is far too thin for an end grain cutting board. And I’ve seen cutting boards with a mix of long grain and end grain and they look really nice for a few months but will soon crack. Can you quartersaw all the boards? That will help with structural integrity and yield some nice looking boards. Cherry and maple do look nice next to each other. I’m sure your end product will look great, please post pics when you’re done.

View mdzehr's profile

mdzehr

380 posts in 976 days


#10 posted 12-12-2019 01:45 PM

Thanks Brian. I will post a pic when I finish. I’m beginning to lean toward a traditional board with breadboard ends mixing the maple and cherry.


Mike,
Add me to the group that thinks 3/4” is far too thin for an end grain cutting board. And I ve seen cutting boards with a mix of long grain and end grain and they look really nice for a few months but will soon crack. Can you quartersaw all the boards? That will help with structural integrity and yield some nice looking boards. Cherry and maple do look nice next to each other. I m sure your end product will look great, please post pics when you re done.

- BrianHurstWW


-- Mike, Lancaster PA

View mdzehr's profile

mdzehr

380 posts in 976 days


#11 posted 12-12-2019 01:47 PM

Thanks but I’m concerned about the structural integrity of two thin layers glued together as well.


How about glueing thinner pieces of end grain to plywood backer.

- whitedogone


-- Mike, Lancaster PA

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

2133 posts in 2016 days


#12 posted 12-12-2019 01:49 PM

If it’s not going to be supported from underneath then it’s not going to be used for serious cutting. Slicing veggies etc I imagine will be the primary use. For that an edge grain board will be fine. See if he wants a proper end grain board to match

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mdzehr

380 posts in 976 days


#13 posted 12-12-2019 01:51 PM

Not a bad idea!


If it s not going to be supported from underneath then it s not going to be used for serious cutting. Slicing veggies etc I imagine will be the primary use. For that an edge grain board will be fine. See if he wants a proper end grain board to match

- GrantA


-- Mike, Lancaster PA

View oldrivers's profile

oldrivers

1960 posts in 2175 days


#14 posted 12-12-2019 01:58 PM

”I was thinking about adding the cherry as the long grain boards on each side, with one in the middle” The long grain boards will expand in width not in length I have used this for eye apeal on the side of 2” end-grain boards without any problems

-- Soli Deo gloria!

View mdzehr's profile

mdzehr

380 posts in 976 days


#15 posted 12-12-2019 02:00 PM

Thanks Oldrivers

”I was thinking about adding the cherry as the long grain boards on each side, with one in the middle” The long grain boards will expand in width not in length I have used this for eye apeal on the side of 2” end-grain boards without any problems

- oldrivers


-- Mike, Lancaster PA

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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