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holding a spoon

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Forum topic by Karda posted 12-10-2019 11:45 PM 556 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

1967 posts in 1162 days


12-10-2019 11:45 PM

Hi, i am working on a spoon and can’t hold it well for a certain area. The area about in the middle of the side the spoon where you have to carve back towards the handle. When carving this area the only way I can hold it is by the tip of the spoon and not to well are there other ways. I don’t have a shave horse and won’t have


20 replies so far

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Lazyman

4531 posts in 1996 days


#1 posted 12-10-2019 11:56 PM

Can you just use a standard woodworking clamp or even a C-clamp to hold it down on your bench by the handle section?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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MrWolfe

622 posts in 732 days


#2 posted 12-10-2019 11:56 PM

I have a wooden bench/table with just a few 3/4 inch holes in it. I use a Dewalt 24 inch clamp that I can remove the head from, insert the clamp through the hole from the bottom, and then reattach the head from the top. I have used this to do some recent carving because I don’t have a shavehorse yet either.

I have made different “jaws” from scrapwood to fit the shape of what I am carving. I’ve also used old rags or rolled up cardboard as a block to better fit the piece I am working on.

I sometime use a small wooden block on the bottom jaw to give me extra clearance when tightening or releasing the clamp.

It works surprisingly well for me. I have sometimes built a jig that will support the piece THEN used the clamp to hold both pieces down.
Jon

In the future you can leave extra wood and use that to screw the spoon down with… then cut off that tab later after it is shaped.

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SMP

1598 posts in 514 days


#3 posted 12-11-2019 12:00 AM

I have used the Paul Sellers clamp in a vise method with a HF sash clamp, as well as a wood screw clamp to grab the spoon blank and clamped that to my bench as well.

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Karda

1967 posts in 1162 days


#4 posted 12-11-2019 12:26 AM

thanks for the suggestion, I never thought of clamping through a hole

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Don W

19434 posts in 3176 days


#5 posted 12-11-2019 10:42 AM

if you search for “spoon shave” or “spoon horse” you’ll find a bunch of idea’s like this one https://www.lumberjocks.com/WayneC/blog/24858

I can’t find the one I always wanted to make, but it was simply a flat piece of wood that sat on your lap. it had holes drilled for a sting looped through that you could keep pressure with your feet.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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HokieKen

12008 posts in 1747 days


#6 posted 12-11-2019 01:03 PM

Funny this is posted today :-) I was reading a blog by LJ Mafe yesterday and saw this picture. I thought it was so brilliant that I saved it. You could easily adapt it to a board that you lay on your lap like Don suggested by strapping the back end around your thigh to prevent it moving.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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ClaudeF

1057 posts in 2315 days


#7 posted 12-11-2019 06:29 PM

If you are hand-holding the spoon, just hold it by the handle. If you are carving with a lapboard to work bench, use an F-clamp to clamp the handle to the board/bench with the spoon bowl projecting over the board/bench into the air.

Claude

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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Phil32

849 posts in 512 days


#8 posted 12-11-2019 08:59 PM

It is often necessary to plan ahead for how you will hold a carving for future steps. Sometimes it is helpful to leave part of the wood blank uncarved to allow for clamping. On a spoon, for example, it is a good idea to leave the back of the spoon bowl flat until after the inside of the bowl is done.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Karda

1967 posts in 1162 days


#9 posted 12-11-2019 09:25 PM

thanks for youre suggestion on the shave horse good ideas. I found this one on pinterest, it clamps to a bench, smaller and more portable. shave horse
Claude i can’t hold by handle because on one side I will be cutting in the wrong direction and the wood will split instead of cut

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SMP

1598 posts in 514 days


#10 posted 12-11-2019 11:52 PM

Some cool ideas here. One of my projects going on now is a Schwarz saw bench. I was thinking of integrating a clamp on horse like the one above that i could attach/remove as needed onto this saw bench. I’ll have to draw up some designs off these.

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Karda

1967 posts in 1162 days


#11 posted 12-11-2019 11:57 PM

let us know what you come up with

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Lazyman

4531 posts in 1996 days


#12 posted 12-12-2019 05:57 AM

Mafe posted a project a little while back on a spoon whittling board that’s as simple as it is clever.

Click for details

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Karda

1967 posts in 1162 days


#13 posted 12-12-2019 06:35 AM

that is a cleaver tool, I can see its value for do the bowl but not for the outside. The work is so low that a straight knife will not be able to cut any direction except down

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muesli

484 posts in 2117 days


#14 posted 12-13-2019 09:54 AM


I don t have a shave horse and won t have
- Karda

If you have a workbench, this might be a solution for you:
https://www.lumberjocks.com/projects/351186

-- Uwe from Germany.

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Karda

1967 posts in 1162 days


#15 posted 12-13-2019 07:25 PM

muesli that is a neat idea, how do you build the jaws. i get the concept but not how to build it thanks Mike

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