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router bit for small boxes

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Forum topic by birdman1charlie posted 12-09-2019 07:32 PM 323 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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birdman1charlie

20 posts in 780 days


12-09-2019 07:32 PM

I have a question about finger joint router bits. I want to do some small boxes with ¼ inch thick sides and 1½ to 3 or 4 inch high. I have done drawers ¾ in thick and used a finger joint jig but for this thin of sides I think the all in one type of bit would make doing the corners much quicker and easier.

I have searched the forums but the discussions move into making jigs.

CMT makes a bit- model 800.616.11 that does 5/32 fingers. I think that would do what I want.

Good idea? Bad Idea? Are you nuts idea?

Thanks for you for your thoughts and Merry Christmas.

Charlie


13 replies so far

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therealSteveN

4655 posts in 1183 days


#1 posted 12-09-2019 10:06 PM

Oooops a double tap

-- Think safe, be safe

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therealSteveN

4655 posts in 1183 days


#2 posted 12-09-2019 10:07 PM



For many years Shaker seed boxes have been made using small finger joints on boxes 3 to 5” tall. Provides a LOT of glue area, and makes an incredibly strong corner. The downside is it also tends to chew up some wood, softwood would be really poor here with a lot of breakout, think harder woods, and straight grain. Plus you’ll get more mileage with 3/8” thick stock, still thinner than normal, but not friable.

- therealSteveN


-- Think safe, be safe

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Aj2

2651 posts in 2406 days


#3 posted 12-10-2019 12:58 AM

5/32 is such a small bit I would have trouble making a jig to work. I’ve tried with 1/4 router bits and it was difficult for me.
A table saw is the way to go with rip blade.
5/32 router bits are not very expensive. Why not give it a try.

Good Luck

-- Aj

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Madmark2

722 posts in 1197 days


#4 posted 12-10-2019 01:28 AM

I think he’s thinking of this type of cutter.

This cutter limits the max stock to the height of the cutter. Cutting both sides is problematic.

Production box joints have a stack of blades and spacers on a common shaft to cut all the fingers at once.

This is the type of operation where thousandths matter in the stock width & thickness.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Aj2

2651 posts in 2406 days


#5 posted 12-10-2019 01:42 AM

Thanks mark for clarifying for me.
That bit looks like $$$ probably not worth experimenting with.

-- Aj

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Madmark2

722 posts in 1197 days


#6 posted 12-10-2019 01:51 AM

$50 at mlcswoodworking.com

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Davevand

151 posts in 1445 days


#7 posted 12-10-2019 03:34 AM

I think a router bit would be difficult with thin stock. I would use a Table saw using a thin kerf blade

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Andybb

2387 posts in 1212 days


#8 posted 12-10-2019 03:39 AM



I think a router bit would be difficult with thin stock. I would use a Table saw using a thin kerf blade

- Davevand

+1

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Lazyman

4535 posts in 1996 days


#9 posted 12-10-2019 04:17 AM

Definitely more chipout using a router bit than a table saw for finger joints in my experience. A backer board is a must.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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therealSteveN

4655 posts in 1183 days


#10 posted 12-10-2019 05:09 AM


I think a router bit would be difficult with thin stock. I would use a Table saw using a thin kerf blade

- Davevand

Me too.

I would use either this set.

Or my new favorite blade. I have the .250 one.

Seems either offers less tear out over a router bit.

-- Think safe, be safe

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AlaskaGuy

5522 posts in 2917 days


#11 posted 12-10-2019 07:24 AM

The old “if I were you” I get a good rip blade and follow this video.

https://youtu.be/nYlA0CRDn3k

Pretty much what I did but I went with 1/4 for 1/2 inch BB

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

713 posts in 156 days


#12 posted 12-10-2019 08:50 AM


I think a router bit would be difficult with thin stock. I would use a Table saw using a thin kerf blade

- Davevand

+1

- Andybb

+2

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: If you tell the truth, you dont have to remember anything (S. Clemens) Edit: Now where is that darn pencil/ tape measure!

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Andybb

2387 posts in 1212 days


#13 posted 12-10-2019 09:07 AM

If you do decide to use a table saw then make this jig. Don’t forget to get a joinery blade that leaves a flat profile.

The blade will stay sharp whereas a router bit will start to dull after a few boxes.

I actually would probably use a regular kerf blade. It will leave a 1/8” cut.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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