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Garage floor in bad shape -can you use plywood to cover the floor?

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Forum topic by MiniMe posted 12-05-2019 06:07 PM 1898 views 0 times favorited 39 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MiniMe

421 posts in 1105 days


12-05-2019 06:07 PM

Hi guys

I have a small garage and the floor is 60y old, cracked and in bad shape, smaller caster get stuck when I try to move a table or anything on small casters

I just saw this picture on Kijiji which inspired my question:

Is it common to use plywood to cover the floor? (provided it is properly set)


39 replies so far

View Mike_in_STL's profile

Mike_in_STL

1389 posts in 1588 days


#1 posted 12-05-2019 06:20 PM

Moisture barrier is advised, unless you like soggy limp plywood. It might be best to run stringers on the floor first to give you an ability to level the floor. Use pressure treated lumber. Regardless of the load of your machines, if you run stringers, use 3/4 inch plywood and not OSB.

If you run stringers, make sure that you anchor them into the concrete with the proper fastener. Use either a Ramset type powder actuated tool or use the type of concrete fastener that you have to drill out first and insert in the hole then crank a nut down to expand the sleeve in the hole.

Keep your stringers under 12 inches on center or closer depending on the load of your machines or run blocking between the stringers perpendicular them.

I put a plywood floor in my man cave on top of the sealed cistern floor where my man cave is. The cistern floor was bowled and my plywood floor is dead flat and I’m glad I did it. I used stringers and shimmed the low spots to compensate for the floor falling away from the treated 2×4s.

-- Sawdust makes me whole --Mike in STL

View pottz's profile

pottz

16178 posts in 2038 days


#2 posted 12-05-2019 06:25 PM

well you could but the problem is your gonna get moisture trapped under it and it’s gonna rot and get mold growing.you could seal the concrete first but if you have cracks moisture is still gonna get through.maybe fill the cracks too.also you could use treated plywood.
looks like mike was typing as i was.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1967 posts in 655 days


#3 posted 12-05-2019 06:26 PM

If you do I would use some type of vapor barrier and some way to deter mold growth. You should probably do some googling to see what the proper method is. Before you do that get some clear plastic several mils thick and tape a 2’ x 2’ piece down so that it is sealed on the edges and leave it overnight. When you return a day later you should have a better idea how much moisture is coming out of the floor. If you have water droplets under the plastic it is a wet location. Doing this wrong could be a disaster you don’t want.

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

421 posts in 1105 days


#4 posted 12-05-2019 06:39 PM

Hmm I have not considered the moisture aspects.
It looks like below, can it still be polished and pour concrete over it?

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1680 posts in 781 days


#5 posted 12-05-2019 06:47 PM

I’m not disagreeing with the above said precautions, but my experience, here out west:

Maybe it’s just that I had older concrete and live in a dryer climate, but I laid down about 30 sheets of 1/8 mdf in my painting area and used gorilla tape to tape them down. I just moved, but they were there for a little over 5 years, with no mold, swelling or moisture. You can see it below, there could be 100-150 coats of overspray on it but… I didn’t have any problems. YMMV

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1358 posts in 957 days


#6 posted 12-05-2019 07:06 PM

It could be that your concrete floor was not designed for the loads you are putting on it, and covering it will not solve that problem. A 500 lb machine pressing down on four casters ?

-- Phil Allin - There are woodworkers and people who collect woodworking tools. The woodworkers have a chair to sit on that they made.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1967 posts in 655 days


#7 posted 12-05-2019 07:09 PM

I am thinking a leveling compound might work. I would look up some flooring and/or concrete professionals to give you any estimate. You will quickly find out if they think it will or won’t work. Even if you will do it yourself let them do some leg work and who knows, you may like the price and let them have at it. The plywood may detract from the house value but a nice level smooth floor should add value IMO. Should make sweeping easier too.

I see flooring contractors level floors all the time and install floating floors over it. I call them click clack floors and I am sure a vapor barrier is still required.

View Mike_in_STL's profile

Mike_in_STL

1389 posts in 1588 days


#8 posted 12-05-2019 07:09 PM

500 lbs across 4 casters assuming even load distribution is only 125 lbs per caster. Unless the concrete is absolute trash and turning to gravel it’s unlikely the floor is that bad.

-- Sawdust makes me whole --Mike in STL

View pottz's profile

pottz

16178 posts in 2038 days


#9 posted 12-05-2019 07:10 PM


Hmm I have not considered the moisture aspects.
It looks like below, can it still be polished and pour concrete over it?

- MiniMe


you probably could,id call a concrete contractor and get a quote on what could be done.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

421 posts in 1105 days


#10 posted 12-05-2019 07:13 PM

no that is a light weight workbench
I added the casters, they are too small for the granularity of the floor and the table gets stuck

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

421 posts in 1105 days


#11 posted 12-05-2019 07:13 PM

Hmm I have not considered the moisture aspects.
It looks like below, can it still be polished and pour concrete over it?

- MiniMe

you probably could,id call a concrete contractor and get a quote on what could be done.

- pottz


you can’t trust them sorry, they will say it has to me removed and redone
if the job is too small they won’t bother
I am considering renting a floor grinder or whatever it is its name and then pour the concrete myself if possible

View pottz's profile

pottz

16178 posts in 2038 days


#12 posted 12-05-2019 07:15 PM



no that is a light weight workbench
I added the casters, they are too small for the granularity of the floor and the table gets stuck

- MiniMe


yeah id switch those to 4” polyurethane casters,it will make a huge difference and cheaper than the solutions given.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

2629 posts in 2030 days


#13 posted 12-05-2019 07:17 PM

You could pour new concrete over it like controlfreak mentioned.You can look into the self leveling cement but you would have to look into it handling the load you put on it. If you do pour concrete on top you want it rough and might have to use a concrete binding agent to help it grab the old concrete.

View pottz's profile

pottz

16178 posts in 2038 days


#14 posted 12-05-2019 07:20 PM



You could pour new concrete over it like controlfreak mentioned.You can look into the self leveling cement but you would have to look into it handling the load you put on it. If you do pour concrete on top you want it rough and might have to use a concrete binding agent to help it grab the old concrete.

- corelz125

looks pretty rough right now-lol.glad you jumped in you were missin all the action buddy.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

421 posts in 1105 days


#15 posted 12-05-2019 08:31 PM



You could pour new concrete over it like controlfreak mentioned.You can look into the self leveling cement but you would have to look into it handling the load you put on it. If you do pour concrete on top you want it rough and might have to use a concrete binding agent to help it grab the old concrete.

- corelz125

there is no load there, just pedestrian traffic to call it so , a ridgid table saw ts3650 is the heaviest piece there
so I don’t think that the load is a problem
I could reinforce with some rebar or chicken wire (I just read this ) . How thin can the layer of new cement be?

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