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Width of band saw blade

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Forum topic by nate22 posted 12-05-2019 02:23 AM 588 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nate22

491 posts in 3482 days


12-05-2019 02:23 AM

I am going to start making band saw boxes and I was wondering what size of blade I should use for making them? Right now the blade I have on it is 6/16th wide.

-- Gracie's wooden signs. Middlebury, In.


24 replies so far

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Davevand

151 posts in 1443 days


#1 posted 12-05-2019 02:51 AM

Depends on how small a radius you want for your boxes. Use the widest you can. I use a 3/16 inch blade

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Andybb

2376 posts in 1210 days


#2 posted 12-05-2019 03:31 AM



I am going to start making band saw boxes and I was wondering what size of blade I should use for making them? Right now the blade I have on it is 6/16th wide.

- nate22

That’s a 3/8’ blade so your min radius is 1 1/2”

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Lazyman

4513 posts in 1994 days


#3 posted 12-05-2019 04:24 AM


That s a 3/8 blade so your min radius is 1 1/2”

- Andybb

But I would go to a 1/4”. Even if you can do a 1-1/2” radius with a 3/8” blade, it will be easier to make that turn with a smaller blade. Also, you can make tight curves even easier if you round or chamfer the back edges of the blade. I bought an abrasive stone specifically designed for that purpose but you can just use an old sharpening stone while the saw is running. I just takes a few seconds. Just make sure you clean out any sawdust because there will be a few sparks.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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GrantA

2128 posts in 2014 days


#4 posted 12-05-2019 02:22 PM

Just make sure you clean out any sawdust because there will be a few sparks.

- Lazyman


Seriously though that’s good advice :-)
I should get one of those stones

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PPK

1641 posts in 1416 days


#5 posted 12-05-2019 05:55 PM

One thing that hasn’t been mentioned here yet is the set of the teeth. Ive seen that chart that shows min radii of certain width bandsaw blades, and I hate it. In reality, it does depend on the blade width, but it equally depends on the set of the teeth. For example, Olson brand 1/4” bandsaw blades CANNOT cut a 5/8” radius, for the simple fact that the teeth don’t have enough set. Conversely, a good Timberwolf brand resaw blade of 1/4” radius can probably beat that radius because it’s good a larger tooth set.

Bandsaw boxes need pretty tight radiuses often. I’d go with a higher quailty blade like Woodslicer or Timberwolf and use a 1/4” max.

-- Pete

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Andybb

2376 posts in 1210 days


#6 posted 12-05-2019 09:52 PM

+1 A 1/4” blade is the widest I’d try and use.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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therealSteveN

4646 posts in 1181 days


#7 posted 12-05-2019 10:34 PM



But I would go to a 1/4”. Even if you can do a 1-1/2” radius with a 3/8” blade, it will be easier to make that turn with a smaller blade. Also, you can make tight curves even easier if you round or chamfer the back edges of the blade. I bought an abrasive stone specifically designed for that purpose but you can just use an old sharpening stone while the saw is running. I just takes a few seconds. Just make sure you clean out any sawdust because there will be a few sparks.

- Lazyman

IF a blade has a bad weld you can quickly find it using a sharpening stone with the saw running. I tend to use some OA paper and hold it around the backside of the blade, and slowly turn the wheel by hand. I find the tactile feel lets you know what is passing between your fingers, and you can surround all but the teeth.

Also not mentioned when talking about these smallish blades is you are clamping, metal, carbon, or some kind of block on either side of it to guide it (your blade guides) what no one ever mentions is even with 1/4” but easily with smaller sizes it’s a chore to clamp in that blade with that “dollar bill” tightness, and not rip all the set off the blade.

For that reason I tend to suggest small cuts be done with A Carter blade stabilizer guide. You can use down to a 3/16 blade, and turn it like it’s on a Ferrari. I wouldn’t be without mine.

https://www.carterproducts.com/band-saw-products/band-saw-stabilizer

For blades I really like the Starrett blades sold through WoodCraft as well as some other dealers. For tight cuts I look at 1/4” as too big, and not tight enough.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Andybb

2376 posts in 1210 days


#8 posted 12-05-2019 11:03 PM

Now I know there’s a 3/16 blade and a set of Carter guides in my future. Will that do what the OP was looking for? Tight curves in 8” of wood??

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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WoodenDreams

883 posts in 517 days


#9 posted 12-06-2019 03:18 AM

Depends on how tight you want the radius of the curves. The off set of the teeth makes a big difference. Recently bought a better quality set of blades (1/8”, 1/4” and 1/2”). Installed the 1/4” was surprised how sharp a radius I could cut. A matter of testing your blades cutting radius, checking if your happy with the radius. If not, replace blade. If you get different sizes like I decided, It does take but a minute to change out blades. And a minute to change back to the other blade.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2630 posts in 3551 days


#10 posted 12-06-2019 06:18 AM

I second the Carter Stabilizer. It’s all I run on my PM, which I dedicated to scroll work. Look at a few videos and you’ll see it takes your saw up a notch. They really are what they say they are.

For bandsaw boxes, I like 4 TPI, 3/16ths blades.

Put the two above together with dressing the back edges and you can reduce the standard radius significantly.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4513 posts in 1994 days


#11 posted 12-06-2019 02:06 PM

Will the Carter Stabilizer work well for cutting through the thick blocks of wood used for bandsaw boxes? Since it only supports the blade in the back, which basically makes it pivot on the back of the blade, and there is no support underneath the table (right?), I would worry that it could result in non vertical or wandering cuts? The only demos I remember seeing where not done in thick stock.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View wncguy's profile

wncguy

471 posts in 2919 days


#12 posted 12-06-2019 02:53 PM

Lazyman, I use the stabilizer with 3/16 tpi & the max thickness I’ve cut for my boxes is about 5.5” (I’d prefer about 3.5 to 4”). I have to use a good sharp blade, be careful & go slow!
I have had non vertical & wandering cuts, so your “worry” is justified.

-- Any man can be a father, but it takes someone special to be a Dad

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Woodchuckswife

31 posts in 1917 days


#13 posted 12-06-2019 02:58 PM

Get that carter guide,I love mine.
Chuck

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Lazyman

4513 posts in 1994 days


#14 posted 12-06-2019 03:06 PM


Lazyman, I use the stabilizer with 3/16 tpi & the max thickness I ve cut for my boxes is about 5.5” (I d prefer about 3.5 to 4”). I have to use a good sharp blade, be careful & go slow!
I have had non vertical & wandering cuts, so your “worry” is justified.

- wncguy

Thanks. I did a little searching and did find a demo using the Carter stabilizer for a bandsaw box and it seemed to work pretty well for him. As you mention, I am sure that having a nice and clean, sharp blade is a must. When I start seeing wandering cuts when resawing, it usually means the blade has some build up that needs to be cleaned off or is getting dull.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2630 posts in 3551 days


#15 posted 12-06-2019 11:39 PM

If it helps, just went out and measured the walnut and apple blocks I have on hand and that I cut to cylinders. They, generally, measure in the area of 7-1/2 to eight inches and were cut with 3/16”, 4 TPI blades on the Stabilizer.

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