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Small dust collection system-advice needed

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Forum topic by MiniMe posted 12-01-2019 09:42 PM 638 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MiniMe

229 posts in 614 days


12-01-2019 09:42 PM

I won’t do woodworking for ever and I won’t do a lot of it.
For that reason I do not intend to install a pro dust collection system.

My workspace will include:
-Ridgid TS3650
-Small plunge/fixed router (Mastercraft Maximum)
-probably a small drill press (bench top)
-less probably a 9-10” bench top band saw
-a Hitachi 10” miter saw

The dust collection “system” will be powered by a Ridgid 12” 5HP vacuum.
I intend to keep the things simple. I would like to build something like this to take care of the top side of the dust collection.

All my tools will be lined up against one longer wall with only the Table Saw moving toward the center of the one car garage when more serious work will be done. The pipe or the hose will be 2.5”

My question is about the top picture: Is there a better or simpler way to build something equivalent to what is shown there? I came across this :
(see this video )

The above is done using plumbing (drainage) fittings which seem to be 1.5” or 2”

BTW what is the name of the fitting that the guy is holding in his hands here: https://youtu.be/_XEg2Lr9x4U?t=205 I am asking bout the piece that is used to hold in place the tip of the hose


12 replies so far

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MiniMe

229 posts in 614 days


#1 posted 12-02-2019 09:25 PM

no dust collecting experts around here :-)?

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CaptainKlutz

2041 posts in 2056 days


#2 posted 12-03-2019 02:26 AM

hmm,
hate to see super easy questions unanswered:

1) Overhead support systems are available from many sources. The exist as stand alone swing/support arms, retractable cables hung from ceiling, or simple overhead beam/track/strut with many adjustable anchor points.
- Support arms are often referred to as tool balancer, or zero gravity devices; to reduce the force required by user in moving/using the tool.
- Overhead retractable cable systems are easy to find at any industrial supply like Grainger, or MSC.
- Rockler sells an expensive overhead support system called Ceiling Track. Commercial manufacturing plants and laboratories typically use a product call Unistrut. It’s a channel hung from ceiling, that has many different types of hangers that bolt to the strut, even simple eye bolts. Most common use of Unistrut is suspending electrical conduit or wire/cable trays from ceiling. HD and Lowes stock it near the conduit in electrical dept. You could call it the “erector set” of over head systems.
TBH – none of these overhead support systems is ‘cheap’ to install. Since you don’t want to spend hundreds on normal dust collector and piping; pretty sure you won’t want to spend the several hundred required per tool balancer or zero gravity arm? Unistrut is generally the cheapest overhead support rail system, but requires more space, labor, and pile of hardware for the install.

2) The pipe fitting used in the picture to hold the last piece of pipe is called a compression fitting. Appears they are using an adapter that goes from 1.5” or 2” glue joint to 1” compression. PVC compression fittings are common in under sink drains, and used in repairing broken pvc pipe. Any home store or plumbing supply will stock that fitting.

3) Bumping a thread in 24 hours just after a holiday expecting a response, with comment about no dust collection experts feels like an insult? Did you ever think that maybe your questions were not dust collection expert material?
Neither of these questions required a ‘dust collection expert’.
- 1st is easy to answer for anyone with expertise in set up of production work environments for maximum efficiency, or electrician with industrial experience.
- 2nd is easily answered by any plumber.
Fortunately for you, I am not a ‘dust collection expert’, TBH not an expert in anything. #IAMAKLUTZ

BTW – ‘dust collection experts’ use large HP, high flow, dust collectors – not vacuum cleaners. LJ has several members with experience in design, building, and installation of professional dust collection systems for industry.

Best luck on your small dust collection system.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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MiniMe

229 posts in 614 days


#3 posted 12-03-2019 03:51 AM

Thanks CK, I had no intention to irritate the audience.
The expert word was used because of the lack of a better one
Yes it is holiday in in US but it is not in Canada or abroad,
I thought this forum has people from all around the world
I just bought most of the fitting components and the price is around $50 +/-$10 as I doubled some of the things. This includes taxes 13% here in Canada

I have to take with me to HD the hose end that goes through that compression fitting to see how that works because the compression fitting the HD employee gave me (1.5”) does not fit (too large) The small shopvac I am going to use for the top side is going to be this one https://www.shopvac.com/product/shop-vac-5-gallon-2-5-peak-hp-wet-dry-vac-catnum:2037027 (I have an older model but the accessories are the same size)
I also have a bigger Ridgid described above. So excepting this adapter that I still need to find I have all the components but I am still in doubt since the price is not that far from $75%+ taxes for the arm I mentioned above

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JohnDon

91 posts in 1731 days


#4 posted 12-03-2019 05:25 AM

I’ll add my $.02 – You’re asking a lot from your poor shop vac. A vac produces a high vacuum (static pressure), but low air flow, whereas dust collectors produce high air flow, and a lower static pressure. A shop vac is most useful for tools with small collection fittings- routers, hand held sanders, etc., while a dust collector is better for stationary tools- table saw, jointer, planer. Generally, if the tool dust port is the size of your shop vac hose (~2”) or less, go with the shop vac. However, that long run of pipe connecting your tools will really compromise vac performance- kind of like trying to run a power hungry tool or appliance by connecting to a long, small gauge extension cord. Much better, move your vac to connect it directly to the port of the tool you’re using. Finally, I think a shop vac is marginal for a band saw, and definitely suboptimal for a table saw. It should be okay for your other tools (if connected directly).

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therealSteveN

4318 posts in 1136 days


#5 posted 12-03-2019 05:54 AM

You will get a LOT better result with your shop vac versus a table saw, and then other tools if you take it tool to tool as you work through your projects. This the primary reason people spend the $$$$$ to have a system that hooks it all, or at least part of it up.

If everything is 110, then one of these will take the work out of the OFF and ON sequence. Keep it on the vac, and every tool you hook to it you then have auto start of the vac, when you turn the tool on, starts with tool start, and runs for 6 seconds or so after to clear the hose. SWEET….

For holding up your cords, and vac hose, these are priced right, and get the job done.

-- Think safe, be safe

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MiniMe

229 posts in 614 days


#6 posted 12-03-2019 01:00 PM


I ll add my $.02 – You re asking a lot from your poor shop vac. A vac produces a high vacuum (static pressure), but low air flow, whereas dust collectors produce high air flow, and a lower static pressure. A shop vac is most useful for tools with small collection fittings- routers, hand held sanders, etc., while a dust collector is better for stationary tools- table saw, jointer, planer. Generally, if the tool dust port is the size of your shop vac hose (~2”) or less, go with the shop vac. However, that long run of pipe connecting your tools will really compromise vac performance- kind of like trying to run a power hungry tool or appliance by connecting to a long, small gauge extension cord. Much better, move your vac to connect it directly to the port of the tool you re using. Finally, I think a shop vac is marginal for a band saw, and definitely suboptimal for a table saw. It should be okay for your other tools (if connected directly).

- JohnDon


What you see in the picture is not my layout or design
As indicated I have a small number of tools and they will sit in line, against one wall. I can chose to place the vacuum in the middle and to its left and right the tools, and so it will sit the arm if I chose to use one
Like this:

The over the head systems (cable or track could be an interesting option but I need to re route some cables that are on the ceiling of my garage and that will be in the way.

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MiniMe

229 posts in 614 days


#7 posted 12-03-2019 02:29 PM

I can’t figure out if these are unistrut rollers
When I google that is the first cheapest link I am getting.
An unistrut track or channel is 29CAD at HomeDepot 10’ long -that is long enough for my project

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4318 posts in 1136 days


#8 posted 12-03-2019 04:27 PM

That link goes to a dead letter office at a place called RONA?????

-- Think safe, be safe

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EarlS

3309 posts in 2910 days


#9 posted 12-03-2019 04:50 PM

Mini – take a look at Rockler. They have overhead channel system that might work for you.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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MiniMe

229 posts in 614 days


#10 posted 12-03-2019 05:02 PM



Mini – take a look at Rockler. They have overhead channel system that might work for you.

- EarlS


That link is dead for me
You mean this one: https://www.rockler.com/starter-kit-for-rockler-ceiling-track-system ?
This is funny I just removed a vertical blinds track from my patio door …I could use that, too bad it is just 6’ long

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EarlS

3309 posts in 2910 days


#11 posted 12-03-2019 06:39 PM

mini – yes – not sure why my link didn’t work. It was the same exact page.

I’m sure there are plenty of DIY versions out there that won’t cost nearly as much as Rockler wants for theirs.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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MiniMe

229 posts in 614 days


#12 posted 12-03-2019 08:22 PM

I pulled the trigger on the articulated arm as that one has the shortest path to production stage :-)
It can be screwed to the ceiling, wall or to a slab on the floor or even on the top of a table.
The cost is $90 but this is metal vs the improvised $50 arm made of fittings

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